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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To those of you who make diapers, or anything else by hand (slings, jewelery, etc.), and suffer from being a horrible perfectionist, how is anything ever good enough?<br><br>
I have spent months preparing my business. I've made and revised and revised and revised (Just to change an 1/8 of an inch in one place at times!), my cover and diaper patterns. I have just completed testing, and it went super <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> . So I am ready to stock my store.....<br><br>
I'm wondering if anyone else has the same problem that I do. I can make a perfectly great product and still find the tiniest things wrong with it. I know that they are not even flaws (like a snap that's 1/16th of an inch off <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"> ), but it still bugs me. I realize that this is a good quality, but if I were to continue doing this, my whole store would be seconds :LOL I sent a second quality cover to someone (horrible serging, because of the combo I used with the alpaca), and she said she couldn't figure out why it was a second. She doesn't sew, so it didn't even bother her.<br><br>
Sorry this is so long, just had to get it out! Maybe saying it will help me realize how silly I'm being. I really just want to sew and not constantly be inspecting with a microsope!<br><br>
Has anyone else had this problem? Did you get over being so critical of your own work?<br><br>
Thanks for letting me vent at myself <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/bag.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Bag">:
 

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I'm super critical of my own work and know exactly how you feel. I spend hours re-stringing and re-sizing and re-doing everything! Honestly, I don't have any advice, but I hope that with time, we'll get better at letting the little things go. I think it can also be a good thing...we care so much about our customers, that we want the product to be perfect. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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I am very critical of my work. I have had similar experiences...where I sold something as a "second" that everyone else said looked "perfect".<br><br>
I handcraft with wire...transforming new and vintage glassware into candle and flower holders. Each item is unique and there is a lot of room for error ... since an "error" can often times be worked into the design or else end up being an additional detail. I have made large Goddess lanterns before and spent an hour *after* I finished just tweaking the wire here and there so that it looked "perfect"....even though I thought it looked perfect when I considered it done and had hung it up. The problem is that I had to walk by it a hundred times a day and so, with every glance, I *thought* I saw something that wasn't as good as I *thought* it could be. I would get my tools and stand there messing with it again and again. My husband told me I was being a nut and I eventually realized that I was <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
It helped when I was wholesaling and received constant positive feedback about my products. I can remember taking in pieces that I wasn't feeling 100% satisfied with...thinking that perhaps I should have curled the wire a little more in one spot or trimmed a piece with more beads etc. ... and then learn from the shop owners that it was one of the first pieces to sell and that the buyer was thrilled with it. That really helped to reenforce what my husband was always telling me.<br><br>
I guess I don't have any brilliant advice but think that once you get going in your business and start getting a ton of positive feedback about your work, that you will start to relax more about it.
 

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I too find like to make the perfect diaper, but I have to let go because I wouldn't make any money!<br>
I am a complusive tweaker, but I am told I must top tweaking by my husband as it takes too much of my time!<br>
After making your diaper, line up the wings and front panel to make sure it's the same, same with the snaps. And make sure the top stitching is even. Other than that! Try to let it go or you'll never get any work done. My husband always quotes this when I am getting way too picky: <b>law of diminishing returns: learning to recognize when it's good enough.</b><br>
Making high quality diapers is important, perfection is not. As we are only human afterall!<br>
I hope this helps, cause I too stress out about perfection!!
 

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I do not sew, but I do the same thing with my dance academy. Especially with choreography. I always feel like it is not good enough. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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I do this also. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/bag.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Bag">:<br>
A good solution for me is to have SOMEONE ELSE do the quality control... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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This actually killed my business, LOL! Nothing I made was ever good enough, and I just stopped out of frustration.<br><br>
I agree with appointing someone else quality control!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>amberb</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I know that they are not even flaws (like a snap that's 1/16th of an inch off <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"> ), but it still bugs me. I realize that this is a good quality, but if I were to continue doing this, my whole store would be seconds :LOL</div>
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:LOL I was just looking at a snap on a diaper I made today and thought the exact same thing! I decided to let it go. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> I'm very critical of my own work as well. In fact, I had 3 diapers that I considered seconds from the batch I sewed up today. Dh couldn't figure out what was wrong with them, but to me the defect was just screaming out!<br><br>
I think we just need to learn to let the really little stuff go, no matter how hard that is!
 

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I think what you are all referring to is called manufacturing tolerances. All companies who produce something have them. Manufacturing tolerances are the standards by which a product is judged first or second quality.<br><br>
I used to work in the crystal industry. We worked with 1/16th of an inch tolerance. That means that if a 10 inch vase actually measured 9.9375 inches tall it is sold as first quality. If it were 9.875 it was considered a second and was either destroyed or sold at an outlet. Size will not affect the performance of the vase but we were a high-end company and didn't want our customers to be able to see the difference without looking really, really hard.<br><br>
You should determine what your manufacturing tolerances are and have them in writing. How do you determine them? First, you should determine what will affect your products performance and/or aesthetic appeal. Then determine the range that would be acceptable to your customers.<br><br>
Inconsistencies in manufacturing can be detrimental to a brand. I can think of one well-known diaper manufacturer that seems to have too large of tolerances in my opinion. I ordered twelve diapers in different colors. I found that each color was a slightly different size - not a huge issue until my DD was at the top of the size range. Then, I found myself trying to remember if it was the yellow ones that were small or was it the pink ones? To me, this said a ton about the company’s quality control. When I purchased the next size up I bought fewer than half of my stash in that brand.<br><br>
Having your manufacturing tolerances in writing will give you a firm guideline and should absolve any question as to what is first or second quality. It will also help you have a clear answer should a customer ever call you to ask why one snap is a hair off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>HR Fluff n’ Stuff</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You should determine what your manufacturing tolerances are and have them in writing. How do you determine them? First, you should determine what will affect your products performance and/or aesthetic appeal. Then determine the range that would be acceptable to your customers.</div>
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Good idea, to get it in writing. At least I know that I'm not alone in this. Sometimes I am affraid that this will bring down my business, because of frustration!<br><br>
Thanks for all your input!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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I have no advice regarding controlling your perfectionism that differs from anyone elses. Except I know I couldn't ask my dp to look at it for me-he'd have no idea what he's looking at! And whenever he wants to show anyone ds's diapers he picks the trashiest old t-shirt dipes as examples! Find someone who sews or something. Or maybe yours does<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Perhaps other dhs have a more discriminating eye...<br><br>
But I don't think you have much to worry about <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bratmobile</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have no advice regarding controlling your perfectionism that differs from anyone elses. Except I know I couldn't ask my dp to look at it for me-he'd have no idea what he's looking at! And whenever he wants to show anyone ds's diapers he picks the trashiest old t-shirt dipes as examples! Find someone who sews or something. Or maybe yours does<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Perhaps other dhs have a more discriminating eye...<br><br>
But I don't think you have much to worry about <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"></div>
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Thanks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> My Mom is a master seamstress, and fiber artist <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> Unfortunately she lives too far away right now to be my quality control, but I e-mail her pics all the time! We will eventually be living together, and have a big studio for all our work (she is also starting a new business right now). It will sure cut down on a lot of phone calls and e-mails :LOL .<br><br>
Thanks for all the advise. I am just going to have to give myself a break! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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