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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know i cant give him raw honey but what if it is in a stir fry. i make an awesome stir fry and in the sauce there is honey. it will be cooked but i need to know if ds can eat the stir fry. he has just been eating what we eat. tia

angela
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by StephandOwen
I don't believe honey is recommended at all before 1 year, even if it's cooked. Maybe leave some out for him before you put the honey in?
Ah I already put it in. The veggies and chicken are marinaded in the sauce for a few hours.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Lilcrunchie
I looked into this when DS was an infant and i'm fairly sure that cooking does NOT kill the botulism spores, which is why the recommendation is no honey in kids under one year of age.
That is what I've heard too.
 

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If the honey is still in a liquid form ,then the botulism (sp?) spores are alive. But when it gets baked into something and becomes dried (like in a cookie or graham cracker)--then the spores do not survive and it is safe to eat under age one.

So, it would NOT feed a >1 yr. old stir fry sauce made with honey.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by VikingKvinna
If it doubt, don't serve it. Always better safe than sorry, no?

For those of us with kids over 1, how about sharing the recipe for your sauce?
:
you bet. i'll post it this afternoon. it is soooooooooooo good.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by daisymommy
If the honey is still in a liquid form ,then the botulism (sp?) spores are alive. But when it gets baked into something and becomes dried (like in a cookie or graham cracker)--then the spores do not survive and it is safe to eat under age one.

So, it would NOT feed a >1 yr. old stir fry sauce made with honey.
This is what the county extension office said when I called them and asked when Michael was a baby.

Here's another question, though. They told me botulism was only an issue with raw honey, not pasteurized. True or not true?
 

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Annettemarie: I actually spoke to a beekeeper friend about this last week!

He said that even "highly processed" honey tends not to have been heated to the temps that would make it safe for infants, so that erring on the side of safety, he and most of his bee-keeping colleagues would recommend just steering clear of all of it until age 1.

BTW, he did say that the risks are pretty remote, but he still feels you may as well be safe.
 

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Commercial canning processes are determined based on the assumption that Clostrudium botulinum may be present in the food. There is a time temperature relationship regarding the destruction of C. botulinum. Typically commercial canners reach temperatures of 250°F (121°C) to make products commercially safe. The amount of time held at 250° depends on the product you are canning. Honey should be heated to at least 250°F to kill spore of C. botulinum which explains why pasteurized (or heated) honey should be safe. I personally wouldn't take the risk since the temperature is above boiling point (212°F) so it's not an easy temperature to achieve.

I looked at Dr Sear's website and he was talking about honey baked in crackers, etc which should be fine. I couldn't find anything where he talked about actually cooking or heating honey yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by VikingKvinna
If it doubt, don't serve it. Always better safe than sorry, no?

For those of us with kids over 1, how about sharing the recipe for your sauce?
:
Ok here is the recipe for the sauce:

4 large garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup honey
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
2 tablespoon cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon pepper

So the way I do it is with chicken and vegetable. The steaming vegetable part I do is time consuming but the healthiest I think. I steam all of the vegetables in my steamer first so I don't have to cook them after. Do this in the morning. When all of the vegetables are steamed put them in a bowl and take 1/2 of the sauce and dump it over the vegetables. Put this bowl in the fridge to marinage for at least 2 hours.

I usually do 2 chicken breasts. I cut them into small bite size chunks. Put them in a bowl and dump the rest of the sauce overtop. Marinate for at least 2 hours.

When you are almost ready to eat, take the reserved 1 tbsp oil and heat in a skillet. Take the chicken out of the bowl with a slotted spoon and save the sauce in the bowl. Stir fry the chicken until it is done. Add the sauce, vegetables (with the sauce from that bowl as well). Cook over medium heat until sauce is thickened.

I always serve my stir fry over rice.

If anyone tries it PLEASE let me know how you liked it!!!
 

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I gave my son cooked honey.

honey is not recommended because raw honey can harbor botulism, which is not something a baby can handle.

When honey is cooked........it's pretty much sterilized, and looses nutrients too. but it is a product of nature and bee products do have some pretty hard to get minerals and nutrients.

I LOVE HONEY
 
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