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As of today, we are officially homeschoolers.


I wasn't planning on using a set curriculum except for maths. However, I realise that I do need some structure for handwriting and spelling.

Dd is five, but has been reading since she was three. I'd guess her reading age to be something like 11 years. She can tell/dictate quite complex stories - she's working on two novels at the moment.
But she gets frustrated when I cant type for her, because her typing and writing are slow. (She does some writing independently, and forms letters correctly, and her pencil control is quite good, but her writing is slower than her thinking. I"m planning on using HWT for daily practice so we can speed things up. She likes HWT, and is eager to do more of it.)

A big issue for her is perfectionism. She knows how a word should 'look' but will write it very hesitantly, checking constantly, and refuses to 'have a go' and correct later. If she makes a mistake, she knows, but will then want to erase the whole word and start again. It can get very frustrating.

So, I think I need to do some formal teaching of spelling families, so that she gets more confident about writing independently. She wants to start a journal, but at her current rate, it will take all year to write a couple of pages LOL.

Does anyone have a spelling scheme that they like? I know I could create one myself, but I'd rather not spend the time.
 

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I bought an older spelling book for my son last year or so. We only got through the first 5 chapters. This year, I am using it for spelling words only. Not doing the basic chapter lessons. This is something you may want to consider. If it isn't what you're looking for, that's okay. It's only a suggestion.
 

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I like (and we use) Spelling Workout. Each lesson has 4-5 pages of different items, such as fill-in-the-blank or word scrambles, that go with the list words and a final section that we usually skip, but would probably be right up your daughter's alley, where they ask you to write a few sentences about something along the theme of the narrative they have at the beginning of the lesson. I think it pairs well with HWT. Bailey enjoys both.

It is, though, a US version and I don't know if there is a UK version out there. It probably wouldn't matter in the earlier levels, but I would imagine there would be some confusion, or need for correction, in the upper levels (realize/realise, etc.).

Eta: OK, DUH. I just saw that you're in the US. Ok, well, then, unless it's a temporary stopover, it would probably work fine.
 

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I like the look of Spelling Power. I was a perfectionist sort of kid, too, and DD is showing signs of it. With SP, you do a practice test to see if you already know the words. The ones that are missed are worked with in activities to practice and correct them, and put on the next day's lists. Ones spelled right go away until review time. This way you're only having to work on words you don't know how to spell. Lessons are also kept deliberately short.
 

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Personally, I believe that the best way for children to learn how to spell is just to practice by writing. To read interesting stuff. Especially with a child who is just 5. If she's already reading and writing, then she will get better real fast doing just that.
just my 2 cents
 

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We are going to use Spelling Power. It is a big Orange book that has Spelling lists through the high school years. You pretest the list and then only study the words you don't know. Each list is based on a spelling rule. We are going to try starting it this year. My son is 7. We will see how he does with it. 5 is a little young IMO to teach spelling but if your daugther is requesting it then that is a different story.

Have you considered getting her a personal recorder for those times you can't type for her? Then she could still dictate the story and then go back later and write it down. Or not. She could just keep it on tape.

You could also work on, seemingly, unrealated fine motor skills activities. Sounds to me like her creative brain is working faster than her hand can write, even if she could spell perfectly. You could try teaching her to type. There is a free bbc typing website. I can't find the link right off hand. Maybe someone else has it?
 

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We are fairly unschooling-influenced, but my son also was nervous about writing - so some basic spelling empowered him.

We used word families in the early years, lots of word games and silly rhyming, then the 100 most common words around 2nd/third grade, then Greek/Latin roots in moderation - just a few here and there. Another fun way was to look up the stories behind words - there are good library books on that for kids - some good stories.

Mostly, whenever we are studying something, I give my son a short piece of copywork - and that helps a lot. Sometimes's well pick out 1 or 2 words that are huge rule-breakers and focus on them a bit - but only lightly.

There are websites to help with all of this, but I broke my finger this morning so I'll let you look for them.

Also, we found the best workbook for 3rd grade spelling - truly fun games and extra connections - my son worked through it on his own - they have younger levels - Spelling Puzzlers by Rigby Best Teachers' Press.

And now in 6th grade, he's still doing Painless Spelling at his own pace.

Best wishes,

Lucie
huntin' & peckin'. luckily with my right hand
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by majikfaerie
Personally, I believe that the best way for children to learn how to spell is just to practice by writing. To read interesting stuff. Especially with a child who is just 5. If she's already reading and writing, then she will get better real fast doing just that.
just my 2 cents
:
Your babe is only 5. Don't worry about it.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by majikfaerie
Personally, I believe that the best way for children to learn how to spell is just to practice by writing. To read interesting stuff. Especially with a child who is just 5. If she's already reading and writing, then she will get better real fast doing just that.
just my 2 cents
Woops! I didn't see her age
:

I totally agree with majikfaerie

Lucie
 

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My 6yo DS is the same way- he especially like typing e-mails, but gets easily frustrated and wants it to be perfect. This morning it took him a half hour to type out a 2 line e-mail. Mostly, I just try to stay out of DS's way and let him figure it out himself. I notice that sometimes he will self correct- the first time he writes a word, he'll spell it incorrectly, but the second time he'll get it right. I think it just takes time and a LOT of exposure to the written word.
 

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Actually, now that I think about it, when the main frustration is typing, there is a wonderful tool already right there for help with spelling - the SPELL CHECKER!
I'm sure any 5 yo who can type read and write can learn to use the spell checker in about 5 seconds, and it doesnt just outright give the correct spelling for every wrong word, it usually gives a few possibilities, so the child will easier get used to recognising the correct spelling.
Just a thought
 

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Check out Spalding. It is a program I used for many years teaching first grade and have recently bought for my son , to use for homeschooling. Spelling words are learned by phonetics....and practiced/seen with phonetic markings ( underlining vowel-consonant-e words, putting a little '2' over a letter if its second sound is used, etc.) Sort of hard to explain, but really a great program....
 

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Probably the most useful thing would be a word wall, or something similar.

When Rain was little and into writing, when she'd ask me how a word was spelled I'd often write it down for her... and at some point I started using the same scrap of paper to do this, so it had a bunch of words on it, like her own personal dictionary. They weren't organized, but you could do that...

dar
 

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In the past I've used words that they've missed in their writing assignments. When a word is spelled incorrectly it's added to their spelling list
Sometimes they get the same word a few times because they spell it wrong a month later.

never more than 10 or less than 5 words

Day 1: pretest
Day 2: Write a sentence with each word
Day 3: Say it spell it write it
Day 4: oral spelling practice-15min
Day 5: final spelling test.

Any word spelled wrong on the final test rolls over onto the next week's spelling list.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Dar
Probably the most useful thing would be a word wall, or something similar.

When Rain was little and into writing, when she'd ask me how a word was spelled I'd often write it down for her... and at some point I started using the same scrap of paper to do this, so it had a bunch of words on it, like her own personal dictionary. They weren't organized, but you could do that...

dar
We're using an address book with the alphabet tabs for this. My son loves it. Whenever he asks how to spell a word I write it in there for him. Its his own dictionary.
Jennifer
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Britishmum
A big issue for her is perfectionism. She knows how a word should 'look' but will write it very hesitantly, checking constantly, and refuses to 'have a go' and correct later. If she makes a mistake, she knows, but will then want to erase the whole word and start again. It can get very frustrating.

So, I think I need to do some formal teaching of spelling families
Is she capable of writing quickly? If so, and she's reading at a Gr. 3 level or better, I'd recommend Sequential Spelling. You can see a sample online. Each spelling lesson consists of a 25 word spelling test (I can't think of anything else to call it, no grade is given). The child writes the word, then the parent starts building the word on a white board or chalk board with the child's help. The child fixes any mistakes and then moves on. Every list ends up perfect. It's organized by word families, and gets into some fairly substantial words early.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Britishmum
As of today, we are officially homeschoolers.

Dd is five, but has been reading since she was three. I'd guess her reading age to be something like 11 years. She can tell/dictate quite complex stories - she's working on two novels at the moment.
But she gets frustrated when I cant type for her, because her typing and writing are slow. (She does some writing independently, and forms letters correctly, and her pencil control is quite good, but her writing is slower than her thinking. I"m planning on using HWT for daily practice so we can speed things up. She likes HWT, and is eager to do more of it.)

A big issue for her is perfectionism. She knows how a word should 'look' but will write it very hesitantly, checking constantly, and refuses to 'have a go' and correct later. If she makes a mistake, she knows, but will then want to erase the whole word and start again. It can get very frustrating.

So, I think I need to do some formal teaching of spelling families, so that she gets more confident about writing independently. )
I would look at Sequential Spelling from AVCO http://www.avko.org/ . Don't be scared off - it's a program designed for dyslexics but I know many people who have used it with gifted kids. My daughter was very similar to yours - a very early and prolific reader. This program was great for her spelling confidence because it works with word families and was very logical for her. For example, they would start with easy -in words like pin or tin and in a few days work on to begin and beginnings or beginners. It was a rapid way for her to develop a large group of words she could spell. She is now 7 (approaching 8) and is doing a more traditional LA program (grade 4l) and breezes through the spelling. While she can ace spelling tests, her spelling while writing still lags. Evidently her brain can't quite keep track of what she wants to say and how to spell it at the same time - but it is also slowly improving. It's not a big deal anymore for her since she's learning to let go of some of those perfectionist tendencies.

Good luck - have fun!
Marti
 
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