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Discussion Starter #1
Hi<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wave.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wave"><br><br>
I am in the market for a new machine, I've been borrowing a friend's and having tons of fun (and actual success for once!!). I have an opportunity coming up to be a part of a moms-to-be class, representing babywearing, and would love to bring along some slings and wraps to sell if anyone is interested.<br><br>
I've never used a serger before, but I love the way they finish edges. Could I use this as my only machine? Things I like to sew are: wraps, ring slings, clothing (I don't do buttons usually), and home decor items (place mats, table runners, etc.).<br><br>
What do you think, and do you have any suggestions?
 

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I would use a sewing machine, especially if you are making clothing. Sergers simply finish the edges of fabric. They do not add strength to withstand the strain of puling and wearing. I have a serger, but have never been able to get it to work properly. I've always found that doing a french seam (or flat felled seam if I'm feeling ambitious) on a regular machine finishes my edges beautifully and I don't have to worry about fraying.
 

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You'll probably find it pretty necessary to have a sewing machine in addition to your serger. I love my serger but depending on what I'm making I definitely need my sewing machine. You could likely get by without the serger and just have the sewing machine though.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your responses. I had a feeling that was the case. I totally hate hemming, and don't know if I even want to think about hemming a 5 yard wrap! Maybe it won't be as bad as I think....
 

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Sergers compliment sewing machines; they don't replace them. It's not just that they don't make buttonholes. They don't sew zippers, do top stitching, decorative stitching (other than the rolled hem), or sew an invisible hem. If you need the seam to lay flat, the serger can't do that. A sewing machine is simply more versatile than a serger.<br><br>
As for hemming 5 yards for a wrap, I did that on the sewing machine. Not on the 2 sergers that I own. One wrap had a looser weave that unraveled when I cut it so I did finish the raw eges on the serger. But then I still turned it twice and top stitched it on the sewing machine. The double turned edge gives the wraps a better, stronger hem. And it still took less than 30 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sewchris2642</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13969795"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">As for hemming 5 yards for a wrap, I did that on the sewing machine. Not on the 2 sergers that I own. One wrap had a looser weave that unraveled when I cut it so I did finish the raw eges on the serger. But then I still turned it twice and top stitched it on the sewing machine. The double turned edge gives the wraps a better, stronger hem. And it still took less than 30 minutes.</div>
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Well that's good to know. I feel like I've really improved in most of my very basic sewing skills, but hemming still usually takes me FOREVER. 30 minutes is do-able, and I guess it will give me a good amount of practice. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Have you tried making a two layer wrap that you can turn and topstitch? I'm with you on hemming. I hate it. I've been doing it so long now that it doesn't take me long, but I'd still prefer not to do it.
 

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For hemming, buy yourself a <a href="http://www.sewingmachine-sales.co.uk/sewing_machine_info/video/60/rolled-hem-foot.html" target="_blank">roll hem foot</a> for your sewing machine. They come in sizes for a very tiny edge to about 1/8".<br><br>
There were three in the box that came with my vintage Singer and I love them for hemming all sorts of things. Curved hems are better serged first then pressed up along that line then topstitched though. The iron is your friend!
 

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For a wrap, I prefer a doubled 1/2" hem. It gives weight to the edges. I fold as I sew which saves time but takes practice to do without ironing.
 
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