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I usually buy the following for recipes:<br><br>
Fresh cilantro, mint and basil. I often end up throwing some of it out, as recipes always call for less than I have, and unless I really plan ahead, it goes bad before I can use it all. Can I freeze these herbs or preserve them somehow?
 

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With the basil, you can make pesto, and the easy way to store that is to freeze it. (You could probably make lazier versions of pesto too, ie leave out any inconvenient ingredients...it would still work.) You can dry mint and use it in tea, such as homemade ice tea... mmm! To dry it hang it upside down, not clumped together, in a dry and well ventilated area. No idea on cilantro, I rarely use it.
 

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i think you can chop them up and freeze them all. i would rinse out the leaves, chop them, let them dry so they're not too moist and sticking together, then just put in a baggie and freeze.
 

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To extend their life in the fridge, put them in a cup of water, like flowers. That helps a little.
 

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Yup, you can freeze them all, even the Cilantro.<br>
I actually buy larger amounts of fresh herbs to wash, chop & freeze for later use.<br>
Certain recipes you need it fresh, but most are compatible wiith previously frozen versions.<br><br>
Another trick for longer fridge life is to wash and dry, then roll in a paper towel and store in a Large Ziploc baggy. I have been able to extend the life of my fresh herbs several days when doing this <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Mint does pretty well frozen whole. For parsley, cilantro and basil, I usually chop it fine or puree it and freeze it in portions. Don't freeze these whole.
 

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I have heard that you can fill ice cube trays with water and fresh herbs, freeze them, and later put the cubes into baggies to keep in the freezer. I have never tried it, but it sounds like it might work.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BamBam'sMom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7934861"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have heard that you can fill ice cube trays with water and fresh herbs, freeze them, and later put the cubes into baggies to keep in the freezer. I have never tried it, but it sounds like it might work.</div>
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I do this, and it works great. I don't use water, usually; I chop the herbs in my Vitamix with water, strain the water (and use in something else, a soup or smoothie or sauce, or to make rice) and put the chopped herbs in T portions in the ice cube tray. Or if I'm feeling lazy I just put the chopped herbs in a small Gladware container or sandwich bag and freeze like that. You can chip enough off of a frozen "block" of herbs for most recipes, and if you need more it thaws very quickly. The ice cube trays are nice b/c you can just pull out one cube and throw it right in hot dishes until it melts.<br><br>
HTH.
 

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Any of those herbs can be dried (lay out on a baking sheet and put at 150-200deg) or frozen (lay out on a sheet to freeze, then transfer to a baggie).<br><br>
Pesto takes a lot of basil. I usually have to buy 2-3 bunches for that (to make enough sauce for 1 box of pasta). So, the leftover of one bunch that I took a few leaves from wouldn't be enough.<br><br>
I tend to use a little bit of basil at a time, so this year I got a flower pot and a $1.50 packet of seeds, and will grow my own. It has to be more economical than buying bunches in the store.<br><br>
As for mint, my husband like to crush a few fresh leaves and drop it into his tea. The last few weeks, he has been taking a thermos to work with weak black tea, crushed mint leaves, and a green cardamom pod. He just asked me to buy him a metal teapot on the internet so he can brew it at work.<br><br>
Cilantro: try to use it more! I have heard it is a great de-toxer, especially for heavy metals.
 
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