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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
if i'm a first time mom who has never breastfed before, can i pump as a method of nip stim to induce labor?<br><br>
i'm just worried that i will pump the protein-rich foremilk that the baby will need when i give birth, but none of the sites that recommend pumping as a natural induction method address that concern. isn't the foremilk special? shouldn't i be "preserving it" rather than stimulating milk release before the labor?
 

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you can pump. your body will make whatever the little one needs. don't fret! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
okay, thanks mama! my honey is working tonight so i thought i might try pumping while watching a movie, and the first time i saw milk, i nearly jumped right out of my skin and stopped right away because i was a little panicked, even though it was exactly what should have happened. but: MY BODY MADE THAT. pretty damned incredible.
 

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yeah it is when you think about it. it is never the same yet always exactly what they baby needs. miracle syrum from a boob!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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It won't hurt your baby's milk supply, and you can always keep the milk to feed the baby using a dropper, cup, or spoon (no artificial nipples - those <span style="text-decoration:underline;">do</span> screw up breastfeeding!) But I caution you literally <i>not to try this at home</i>, at least not for hours at a time. Pumping for extended periods to induce labor can cause tetanic contractions, cutting off oxygen to the baby and increasing your risk of uterine rupture. UR does not only occur in VBACs and, although it is much less common on an unscarred uterus, it is also even more hazardous than a scar re-opening if it does happen.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">"Labor induction cannot be 'natural'. It is always a way to precede the signals given by the baby and by your own body."<br><br>
Michael Odent. M.D.<br><br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/sections/experts/odent-archive.html#inducing" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/sections/ex....html#inducing</a></td>
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i don't have an electric pump, just a handpump, so doing it for an extended period of time isn't even an option. i did 15 minutes on one breast, 15 on the other, and that was about it for right now. that's the method that the books and midwives' websites recommend, and i can't imagine that they'd recommend it if it weren't safe.
 

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oh boy! I'm going to get myself a pump! I haven't heard anything bad about pumping to induce labor. I also wonder if I even have milk-it would be awesome to find out before I give birth!!! (there is a medical possibility that I won't have enough...)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>expectantmami</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9880710"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">oh boy! I'm going to get myself a pump! I haven't heard anything bad about pumping to induce labor. I also wonder if I even have milk-it would be awesome to find out before I give birth!!! (there is a medical possibility that I won't have enough...)</div>
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it would not be at all unusual if you didn't have milk yet. the milk comes in quickly but usually not until there's plenty o' suckage at the breast. so if you do get a pump and nothing really comes out, that's normal and nothing to worry about. i was frankly surprised by how quickly i produced it.
 

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with dd#1 (born at 42 weeks) my mws had me pumping to induce labor starting at 40 weeks... unfortunately, it just didn't work for me! it did not even get contractions started.
 

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BTW, if nipple stim causes super intense ctx all you have to do is stop stimulating and things will go back to normal. I think the "risk" of hyperstimulation is very small and the risk of rupture would be almost nonexistent.<br><br>
Christa
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>crsta33</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9882465"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">BTW, if nipple stim causes super intense ctx all you have to do is stop stimulating and things will go back to normal. I think the "risk" of hyperstimulation is very small and the risk of rupture would be almost nonexistent.</div>
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that was also my understanding. right now all that happens when i do the nipple stimulation is that the baby gets really excited and starts rubbing its butt, hard, back and forth. which is interesting, but not what i was hoping for! i had a few contractions last night before bed, but i've had 2-3 contractions a night for the last 9 days, so that's not new.<br><br>
i know that the baby will come when its ready, regardless of what i do, but my midwives actually encouraged nipple stimulation and sex at my last visit since the baby is getting so big. i know that i <i>could</i> give birth to a 12 pounder at 42w, but i'd rather not, call me crazy.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>expectantmami</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I also wonder if I even have milk-it would be awesome to find out before I give birth!!! (there is a medical possibility that I won't have enough...)</div>
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It was my understanding that true milk production won't really occur until the placenta is delivered after your baby is born. Of course, all I know of this is what I learned in a recent breastfeeding class: "At birth, prolactin levels remain high, while the delivery of the placenta results in a sudden drop in progesterone, estrogen, and HPL levels. This abrupt withdrawal of progesterone in the presence of high prolactin levels stimulates the copious milk production of Lactogenesis II." So, I would be extremely surprised if anyone pumping to stimulate contractions would see true milk (unless, of course, they were currently/recently breastfeeding another child). You could certainly see colostrum, though. (Although it wouldn't be uncommon to not see colostrum either.)<br><br>
Please correct me if this is not correct. I'm new to all of this and would certainly be curious if what I was told was untrue. I'm worried about milk supply too because of a medical condition.<br><br>
Thanks!<br>
K
 

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The protien-rich colostrum is probably the only thing you would get (unless of course you were still nursing an older toddler... but even then, I still only have colostrum). Your body won't begin producing "real" milk until after the placenta is born, and it could take a few days for that to "come in". My milk didn't come in until DD#1 was 8 days old... not uncommon for a FTM. (With DD#2 it was 4 days.)<br><br>
Your body will produce milk and colostrum on a supply/demand system. Therefore... if a baby is sucking, or if you're pumping, you will begin producing more. If there is no baby sucking, etc. you will produce less. You don't have a fixed amount of colostrum, so don't worry that you won't have any left for the baby.<br><br>
Also, remember that newborns don't need to eat that much colostrum... only teaspoons per feeding, not ounces. You will have plenty for them. The best way to ensure a good supply is to allow the baby to suckle as much as possible and avoid artificial nipples as much as possible.<br><br>
So... after all my ramblings... no, pumping as nipple stimulation will not negatively affect your milk supply.<br><br>
Emily
 
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