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Good experiences?? Bad?? Did the Bradley Method work for you?? I have a book I just started reading, but I'd really like first hand accounts.<br><br>
Thanks in advance.
 

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I used it with my two youngest and it worked great for us. My husband was very well prepared and confident; he actually saved the day by making me change position when the OB told me "We have to get that baby out NOW!" He suggested that I get up into a squat, I refused, he insisted, and baby's heartrate immediately went back to normal and the hospital staff relaxed.<br><br>
Everything I learned from Bradley really helped me approach my births in a calm, confident and reassured manner and I succeeded in having unmedicated, minimal-intervention births at a hospital birthing center. My recoveries were quick and easy, too.
 

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All mine were very physical, sensual births where I used my own resources. I didn't rely (or want to rely) on anyone to "coach" or remind me of things. I think that is counter intuitive.<br><br>
I think it's best to read and draw from all sources of birth knowledge, and not pigeon hole yourself with any single "method".<br><br>
The Bradley Book is a good read, has lots of useful descriptions and easy to understand pictures. I hear mixed things about classes. I'd get the book, and see what you think.
 

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<a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=801222" target="_blank">This thread</a> might be helpful <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> There are lots of Bradley discussions around here, too. The Birth Stories subforum has a bunch as well.<br><br>
Are you reading Susan McCutcheon's book or Dr. Bradley's original?? Big difference, IMO.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>georgia</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10302511"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Are you reading Susan McCutcheon's book or Dr. Bradley's original?? Big difference, IMO.</div>
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I will have to get back to you on that. The book is at home. Which do you recommend and why? Thanks!!
 

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I took a Bradley class, then taught for a while. I think that it has good and bad points. What led me to change what class I teach was the fact that it comes across, when taught by the book (meaning by the outline given by the Academy), rather regimented. There is lip service given to listening to your body but it often translates in practice into feeling like you "should" be doing or feeling a certain thing, and that you're doing things "wrong" if not. I'm eternally grateful to the Bradley class I took with my 1st and I think it's a great class-it would not fit my birth philosophies NOW though.
 

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I chose a Bradley class for our first birth because of all the ones I looked into, it had the biggest focus on teaching the partner what to do. My DH needs that; without specific instructions, he tends to kind of shut down and tune out when things get weird. ;-) We're also both info-junkies and LOVED the information-intensive aspect of the class. We were the ones always asking even more questions.<br><br>
I felt like the information helped during our birth, and definitely, my DH benefitted hugely from having had the class; he was much more involved than I think he would have been otherwise. Our birth went pear-shaped from the word go, though, and of course I hadn't prepared for the things I ended up needing to be prepared for (you know how your best indicator of how your first birth will be is your own mother's first birth? Turns out, I got MIL's birth instead!). I don't think a different class would have made a difference in our outcome, however. Having a doula... THAT might have helped!
 

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I think that you should call your local bradley instructor and talk to them about their classes. My class, and the teach we is 30 minutes from me, have completly different teaching styles.<br><br>
I loved my Bradley classes so much that I had to start teaching myself. I do have to politely disagree with PP who stated that you are doing something "wrong" if you are not feeling what you "should" be. I certainly tell my mom's to tune into their bodies and do whatever feels right!<br><br>
Again, of you are looking into it, I would definately call your local instructor and discuss any concerns with them!
 

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Aw man! u catch me when i am nak.. be back tomorrow to share my two experiences with it.
 

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We took Bradley. It was especially good for my DH who had not done much reading before I was pregnant. I think it really helps prepare you for a hospital birth and dealing with all of the attempted interventions. When we finished the class however, I kept struggling with "how" I was going to relax during labor - so we took a hypnobirthing class. The combination of the two was fantastic.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I do have to politely disagree with PP who stated that you are doing something "wrong" if you are not feeling what you "should" be.</td>
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You can disagree, but a common theme I hear talking to women who've taken Bradley (and how I felt myself during my first labor) is that there is a certain way you "should" do things. If you aren't going limp and motionless during contractions, it "proves" that you aren't relaxing enough, for example. I think individual teachers negate this to different degrees.
 

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We just finished our Bradley class this week (obviously haven't used it in labor, yet). And basically, I really appreciated all the info. And I think it will be very helpful in my birth experience. There were 2 other homebirthing couples in the class and our instructor had her last baby at home and is pregnant and planning a 2nd homebirth. Anyway, she did a really good job of making the information useful for hospital birthers as well as for homebirthers. We've also asked her to be our doula.<br><br>
Anyway, I wanted to add that I'm really glad I took the class BEFORE I started reading Husband Caoched Childbirth. From the info in the class, I think there are a lot of good ideas that Dr. Bradley had and presented. But when I read the book, he sort of writes from this attitude that women don't have the instinct to give birth and without proper training and coaching, we won't be able to conduct ourselves appropriately during labor and delivery. I really balk at this idea. And I balk even further at the idea that Dr Bradley and my husband will be able to train me in "labor conduct." Ummmmm.... I have a really hard time believing that men know more about labor and birth than women do.<br><br>
But my instructor NEVER said ANYTHING that made me think that this was the underlying philosophy of the Bradley method. I only got that idea when I read the book. So I'm thinking that it will really depend on your instructor whether or not this philosophy is conveyed.<br><br>
And my own personal opinion on the way Dr. Bradley writes in his book is that it's a bunch of bull. I know that I have never given birth before. But if I listened to Dr. Bradley, I wouldn't be able to build up the trust and confidence in myself that I'm convinced is going to be necessary for a NCB. Instead, I look at hundreds of thousands of years of women who have given birth for the first time. And I truly honestly believe that I am connected somehow to all those women, if only through experience, and that my body was made for this specific purpose. NCB is possible and I trust that I can do it. And I don't think I NEED a man to "train me in the conduct of labor" (sorry slight rant there).
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Ironica</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10305383"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I felt like the information helped during our birth, and definitely, my DH benefitted hugely from having had the class; he was much more involved than I think he would have been otherwise. Our birth went pear-shaped from the word go, though, and of course I hadn't prepared for the things I ended up needing to be prepared for (you know how your best indicator of how your first birth will be is your own mother's first birth? Turns out, I got MIL's birth instead!). I don't think a different class would have made a difference in our outcome, however. Having a doula... THAT might have helped!</div>
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Ditto. (except for the MIL part). I don't think I would have felt right about pushing for 7 hours had I not learned all I had in Bradley classes. DH and I had the benefit of taking our class with no other couples, so our sessions were really focused on our questions/concerns and trial labors. I fell asleep during one round of practice!<br>
DH loved Bradley and enjoyed the book (Husband Coached Childbirth). He was the one to offer it to our neighbor for their pregnancy. He was absolutely amazing throughout labor and delivery, too.
 

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I slept through transistion with my son. I really like the Bradley techniques. I have used it for painful procedures unrelated to childbirth, and found it extremely helpful.
 

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I took Bradley classes after I took a Childbirth Class with our local doula/midwife center. The two classes combined gave me enough tools for me to utilize during birth. I learned so much from Bradley about birth in general that I had no clue about. The biggest thing that I held on to from the class is that when you relax (the best you can) then you are allowing your body and muscles to work more effeciently rather than fighting it.<br>
I never used that classic Bradley relaxing position on your side/belly during labor. I can definatly say that it was much much better than any hospital class could take (at least around here).<br>
I was a little put off by the 'husband-coached' childbirth since I was a single mom. However, the class I took was private, so I was the only one in it. My mom lovingly took on the role as the 'partner' and my instructor never tried to emphasis 'husband coached' part of it.<br>
I read Susan's book before I started the class which I thought was written wonderfully. I read through my Bradley workbook and was sort of shocked by the way somethings were worded....i.e. saying that you are bad if you do this (just a little brash)<br>
Overall....I would recommend it and def. recommend it in addition to another class for relaxation and labor techniques. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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The thing I really liked about Bradley (read both books, they are definitely different) was the information on the risks of interventions. I started the pregnancy knowing I didn't want anything done to me, but I didn't have much support for my position until the Bradley classes got me started researching. They are a good place to get ideas for what you want to look into more.<br><br>
Now, I have to say that the relaxation techniques don't help a whole lot if you never practice them before the birth. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"> Heh - but maybe they were helping after all, my labor never did get all that painful. It was also useful to know how to watch my signposts for how labor was progressing (helpful when you've been in labor for two hours and still have a five hour drive to get to your birthplace), and to avoid tensing up during contractions.<br><br>
Other than that, I think my class could have been better with a more naturally-minded instructor. She was for natural birth, but not so much against interventions, it seemed like - the class was mostly geared for hospital birthers.<br><br>
I don't have any complaints with Bradley, but I will probably explore another method for my next birth, just to have a broader education.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>diamond lil</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10302571"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I will have to get back to you on that. The book is at home. Which do you recommend and why? Thanks!!</div>
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Personally, I found the McCutcheon book great for practical techniques and excellent descriptions of the labor process. Robert Bradley's book was great for the philosophy and a global perspective. I would read the Bradley one first, then McCutcheon. I found both extremely useful.
 

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I loved the way it gently brought my husband on board with NCB, too. I too, thought it was really a little strange, how husbands (who never give birth) would be more qualified to coach, than an actual woman, who is made to birth??? But like what some of the other posters have said. It was VERY informative. Take what you like, leave the rest behind. Really, that's what we should do with anything, right? Since then (on baby #3 now), I have migrated to a more unstructured way to birth, but I can't say that I would have been ready for that with my first. Not to say that some Mama's wouldn't, I just wasn't there yet. I am soooo thankful for Bradley, because it opened the doors for me to start questioning EVERYTHING about pregnancy and childbirth. From there, I just kept growing. We have to keep in mind that most people today, have been socialized and brainwashed, that sometimes tuning in to our own instincts is difficult. I think sometimes we really have to unlearn, to be able to follow instints. In fact, let go of everything that is "rational", because you will interfere with what is instinctual and intended during birth.
 
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