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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading another thread, I am begining to doubt my earlier postion and I thought you guys could help me figure it out. I thought that pretty much every baby who is born here in the United States can find a home. I didn't think that there were any infants - of any race - waiting for families. Am I wrong about that? We dont' have any problem with transracial adoption, but we just thought that we could do more good overseas. However, I really would love to have the experience of parenting a child from infancy and that is not an option with international adoption. Can someone tell me the facts about this? Also, what are some good agencies if you want to adopt an african american infant from the United States?<br><br>
Thanks in advance.<br><br>
~Rachel
 

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Rachel,<br>
I actually cut and pasted my post from another thread. I may be able to answer some of your questions if you want. What state are you in? The laws vary. We were not comfortable with the laws in MI and traveled to Ohio for a placement. The agency we worked with is in need of families that are willing to adopt AA infants. Our daughter was 5 days old when she was placed with us. She was in the hospital for 3 weeks at birth because she was two months early. She is doing great now. Now health problems.<br><br><br>
Here's the post I cut and pasted:<br>
I'm sorry for the misunderstanding. We did not have referals with the first four babies.<br><br>
Baby number 1 from Kansas. At our first homestudy meeting our SW mentioned that their was a baby in agency foster (very different than state FC). We were told the fees were $14,000 because he was biracial. When we called the placement fees were actually $23,000 because he was biracial. This healthy baby sat in fostercare becuase they could not find a family that would adopt a darker child. We were willing but could not afford the higher fee. They would not adjust their fees so this baby sat in FC<br><br>
Baby number 2 from Oklahoma.. I came across this particular birthmom on an agency website from OK. She was due in approx. 4 weeks Our homestudy was not complete at this point and OK agency was hesitant to present us to BM. Our SW was trying to expedite our homestudy and the BM delivered early. The agency did not have one single family to present to her. By the time our SW finished our HS the BM felt too overwhelmed to choose a family and decided to parent.<br><br>
Baby number 3 from Michigan. We actully live in Michigan and I am not comfortable with MI's adoption laws. However our homestudy agancy contacted us in regards to a BM. The agency understood that we were not comfortable with MI's laws but asked if we would please meet with her because they did not have any other families to present to her. We did meet with her and in the end she was not comfortable with us because of religious differences. I do not know if she ended up placing the baby after it was born.<br><br>
Babies number 3 and 4 from Ohio. The agency that we decided to work with in Ohio called us because they did not have any other familes that were waiting for AA children. They asked if we would consider twins, yes, again, healthy babies. A BM was in larbor and dialated to 4. We needed to make a decision quick. As hard as it was we decided agaist the twins. Our SW did mention, If we changed our mind to call her. Why? Because these healthy babies would end up in foster care.<br><br>
Baby number 5 from Ohio. Is our daugther and she rocks and she is healthy<br><br>
Ok, so I guess it was only 5 potentials. A commomn thread among the babies and BM's is the lack of available families for them.<br><br>
Each state has very different laws in regards to revoking consent. Someone stated that the BM's have 90 days to change their minds. This is simply not true for every state. Sorry the post got so long and I'm by no means against international adoption. I just want correct information posted in regard to domestic adoption.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much for your reply. That clears a lot up for me. We are just looking at different options for our second adoption - which won't be for another year or two as we are still working on the first! This gives me a lot to think about and I will continue to look into it. Thanks for your help!
 

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Didn't want to not answer but I really don't know. I would start with looking on the internet, calling agencies and seeing whats all involved, I know each state is different. Talking to people who have BTDT really helps too.
 

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I would recommend you check out PACT. They place only AA and biracial babies.<br><br>
I believe that AdoptionLink is another agency working solely with AA/biracial babies. AdoptionLink was started by the same woman who started Chances by Choices, which places HIV+ kids.<br><br>
Namaste!
 

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I second the recommendation to check out PACT. (pactadopt.org) As mentioned, they solely place children of color (of all ethnicities), are incredibly ethical and child centered, and are also the best resource I've found for white people considering transracial adoption. Their article section of their website has been amazingly educational. They also utilize a sliding scale for their fee structure, so total adoption expenses are kept to the low side for most of the adoptions they complete.<br><br>
As to your question -- yes, in some areas of the country there are newborn children of color who are born with few options for adoptive parents. Most often those children have two African American birthparents.<br><br>
A leading website lists 294 hopeful adoptive couples who are homestudy ready and looking to match with an expectant mother. 269 of them are open to a Caucasian child. 33, or 11% are open to an African American child.<br><br>
Feel free to PM me if you want to talk about domestic transracial adoption further, and good luck on the adoption of your first child!
 

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Hi. There's at least two mamas on this board who have adopted AA or AA/multi babies via WACAP's African American Infant program. Check them out at <a href="http://www.wacap.org" target="_blank">http://www.wacap.org</a>.<br><br>
We had a good experience with them. Pluses: They work with various placing agencies around the country, and you can chose to be presented to all agencies or a subset of them depending on feelings about everything ranging from their religious requirements (when we did it, one agency in Georgia required a statement of faith), policies on marriage, local laws, fee structures, etc. etc. Fair amount of choice, although sometimes the level of choice feels a bit staggering! You can ask WACAP what their policies are on which agencies they are willing to work with -- I think they look for agencies that provide good-quality counselling and support to birthmoms, among other things. They are flexible on some political stuff, and I wasn't crazy about all of the placing agencies. But WACAP itself is nonsectarian and pretty progressive. The woman heading up the AA Infant program is extremely broad-minded and very queer-friendly, for instance.<br><br>
They are headquartered outside of Seattle, but work with families all over the country and maybe Canada, too.<br><br>
I don't know what the numbers are in terms of what level of shortage there is for parents of AA kids. But I do know there aren't enough. AA babies are at risk of ending up in foster care, and once they're there it doesn't improve the ratio of kids needing homes : adults willing to adopt. *sigh*
 

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Both my babies have black American birth fathers and birth mothers of mixed ethnicities.<br>
I live in WI and my DD was born in Milwaukee, my DS was born in OKC. I got the referral for DS from a service in MI that specializes in connecting families with black and bi babies who have no potential adoptive families available locally. Most of the babies they place are black and/or have known birth defects.<br>
We were actually going to go with a Texas agency just before we got that last referral, but when I just went to get the link, I discovered the page was no longer there... but here's a picture of my babes <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"><br><br><br><a href="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v11/delmom/siggymarch.jpg" target="_blank">http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v1...siggymarch.jpg</a>
 

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I'll second (third?) the reccomendation to check out PACT. They are a great resource for trans-racial families, even if you do not adopt through them.<br>
We adopted our AA baby boy through a referral from an attorney here in the SF Bay area, Susan Romer. <a href="http://www.1800uadoptus.com" target="_blank">www.1800uadoptus.com</a> She and her staff are great! It turns out that she places a lot of AA and bi-racial kids because the bay area is quite open to trans-racial adoption is ways that other areas of the country are not. Susan has worked hard to form relationships with lots of other adoption attorneys and when one of them has a baby to place but no families willing to take them, they call Susan. That's how we got our bundle! I can't imagine anyone not wanting him!!! (Susan does work with adopting families from outside the area.)<br><br>
I think the key with domestic adoption (I guess all adoptions, really) is to be open to whatever you think you can handle... so when the form asks about race, think hard about yourself, your family and your neighborhood and check "yes" to as many races as you can. Likewise for health conditions, etc. (We decided that we could deal with a child with, or with a family history of, any condition that we have in our genetic background. That did include some scary stuff.) The more "yes"es you include (and feel truely comfortable with), the more potential birthmoms will see your letter and the quicker you are likely to find the child that has always belonged in your family. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Sorry for the wordy reply. Good luck!
 
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