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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
See, I am good with spacial/visual mathematics. I flunked geometry 2 times in high schooll(football coach as teacher both times.yuck!) but at the same time, I was drawing perfectly realistic portraits in art class, and totally excelling there.<br><br>
My question- how at a young age do I incorporate appropriate math for a child who may be the same way? Or a child who is opposite me? Will I be able to tell?<br>
I guess I want to take a very slow approach to math in any structured form for fear that they may be put off like I was. Granted, I had bad teachers, but still. I just couldn't get over the fact that my teachers would say "in geometry, there are some things you can't fully understand but just have to take it as such" Drove me CRAZY. I wanted to know why. I still don't do well with structured math as well as I do things such as sewing patterns, or eyeing something to make it straight, drawing straight lines, circles, etc- all of which may not bto be able to track my kids development, while being sensitive to learning styles in math.I don't know if this all makes sense or not.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/innocent.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shy">
 

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We use Math U See <i>because</i> of its high visual/tactile approach. That, along with Montessori activities make up the bulk of our curriculum. But the thing I love about MUS is that we don't have to rely on the visual approach. If he's comfortable doing a lesson without it, then he does it in his head. The workbooks are very plain (black and white) so no distractions.<br><br>
Montessori in the home books offer lots of advice for visual math, and there's online albums and printables to help present different activities to young children.
 

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Imagine learning a lesson then learning were it applies. Imagine if they used what you are good at to teach the lessons. How would geomtry help you in art? How would art help you in geomtry.
 

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maybe it's just me, but I have never had a problem incorporating math (so far - DD is only 5). Just by doing things with her and playing games, we've covered aspects of:<br>
addition<br>
subtraction<br>
multiplication<br>
division<br>
geometry (how shapes like squares, triangles, hexagons relate to one another; parallel versus perpendicular)<br>
fractions (cooking and baking are great for this - but so is cutting a pizza!)<br>
decimals (just starting to get into this with money)<br><br>
That's all I can think of at the moment...although we have done some rudimentary algebra ("We have 4 of these. How many more would we need to make 6 of them?") too. We are working on what numbers "mean" - i.e., what is "40"? How many is that? I don't think DD can visualize much beyond 30, and I don't think she "gets" what 100 or 1,000 or 1 million means yet - but we're getting there.<br><br>
If you want it to satisfy the "Why" question, it has to be part of real life. Maybe once you get into geometric proofs it will be more complicated, and you don't say how old your DCs are. But I think for a good long time, just living life and hanging out with them will give you plenty of opportunities for math.<br><br>
Another thought - building something (like with wood) would be a great geometry lesson. Or even building with popsicle sticks or something.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">See, I am good with spacial/visual mathematics. I flunked geometry 2 times in high schooll(football coach as teacher both times.yuck!) but at the same time, I was drawing perfectly realistic portraits in art class, and totally excelling there.</div>
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<span>Do consider that he may have been such a poor teacher that it was his problem and not yours that caused you to fail. I started geometry at one school and was horrified at how little I could understand - I had no idea what was going on. Then I transferred to another school, and it quickly became my favorite subject. <i>I loved it!</i><br><br>
I really wouldn't worry about it - there are so many good materials these days that you'll easily be able to find what works well for your children, and you won't need to be "the teacher" who feeds it into them. And lots of them satisfy the "whys." I'd be willing to wager that your football coach guy wasn't well versed in what he was trying to teach, couldn't relate well to the "whys," and made things distasteful that normally wouldn't be.<br><br>
You might find some help with your questions among the articles I've linked to from my page of math links: <a href="http://besthomeschooling.org/gateway/inted03.html" target="_blank">Go Figure!</a> There's a lot there about making math a fun and natural part of life. -Lillian</span>
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
wow, thanks everyone<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Feeling better about it now.<br><br>
I am not too worried about it yet, since my kids are 5 and 3. But it was a question that was bugging me!<br><br>
I will make it a point to try and measure with dd when we cook<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/duh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="duh">: I am so not good at remembering to measure.
 
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