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Discussion Starter #1
I was hoping to make yogurt out of bm, since my dh has milk senstivities (so I want to avoid any milk product for a while) I want to get the probiotics in her (she has cradle cap, and the pedi recommended probiotics to get rid of her yeast issues) So, I tried it, and it didnt work. I heated it, then cooled it, added the powder culture, then put into the yogurt maker. I tried it with 2 batches and neither worked. I tried it with regular whole milk, just to make sure the culture was working, and it worked. Do I need to add powdered milk to thicken it, since it came out all watery? TIA
 

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I KNOW that it can be done because breastmilk yogurt is what my MW recomends as a first "solid." However, we are still 6 months away from that and I have NO idea how to do it, i did mention that i thought the process of making yogurt, sounded very complicated. She said not at all with an automatic yogurt maker and those only cost about $20 she said.<br><br>
My MW also gave me a cradle cap treatment that worked for us - first time and it's never returned. She explained that cradlecap is rather like crabgrass and if you don't get it all, it will come back. We put some olive oil on his head, and i gently loosened the gunk with my fingernails over the course of about an hour - lots of little breaks in there allowing the olive oil to set....then we combed thru his hair we kept doing this till all was loosened and removed, then we shampooed and it hasn't been back since.<br><br>
Anyhow I somehow you will be able to make breastmilk yogurt for your husband or daughter <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> keep searching sorry i cant tell you more about how to do that part.<br><br>
good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Interesting, this is the first I have heard of anyone else saying that bm yogurt could be made. Ill have to give it another go.
 

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you may want to try incubating in a lower temp, like 105F? It may still be runny, but if it smells good, I'll say go for it. I make nut milk yogurt in a lower temp, but it will not be solid, but loose. Make sure you have cooled the milk before you add the starter to avoid thermal shock. I cool my nut milk to 65F ish. And, don't add too many starter: More the better doesn't apply here. It will over crowd the milk, and they can't grow/cultue in the milk. Good luck and let us know how it goes. I think BF milk yogurt or shake will be a super food for you babe.
 

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my MW was also telling me to have a large stash of frozen breastmilk, to make the yogurt from that....so if it is temp dependant...you can use frozen.<br><br>
maybe i should just pm you her name?
 

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moonbeam: Are you asking if you could use the frozen breastmilk? My guess is that you can, but just don't defrost it in microwave. I would put it in the ref. for over night instead.<br><br>
And, yes, yogurt making can be very temperature demanding. You have to create the environment that the good bacteria can thrive, and not the bad. Each "bedding" of the probiotics to thrive requires different temp.<br><br>
Most people may think the yogurt/cultured food is not done, unless it is firm, like the store bought yogurt. It isn't so with home made, various milk sources. You incubate for the certain amount of time, in a rather specific temp, undisturbed. When done, it would smell and taste yummy, although it may be runny.<br><br>
For an example, I make yogurt from goat's milk at 110F, and incubate for 24hr. to get the lactose out: My kids are lactose and casein sensitive. And, when I incubate nut milk, I would only incubate for 8hr at 105F, since there is no 'sugar' content to worry about. If you incubate more than 24hr., the yogurt will be firm, but tart. You will also see more whey, separating from the milk.<br><br>
I never had enough BM to make yogurt out, and never have tried. I'm just putting my 2c opinion based on my yogurt making experience.<br><br>
I hope I answered your question...
 

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Once, after a very funny and strange conversation with a friend, I did some research into whether you could make cheese or yogurt from breastmilk.<br><br>
What I found (and sorry, I"ve lost the link) is that human milk has some enzyme in it that prevents the solidifying of the final product. Essentially, breastmilk will not curdle (at least, not in the cheese and yogurt making way)<br><br>
So you can *culture* breastmilk, but you cannot make firm products from it!<br><br>
I wish I could find the link where I finally found that - it was from an old agricultural manual that talked about the properties of different milks - human, cow, ass, goat, etc...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hum, Im not sure how much more bm Im willing to waste trying to make yogurt with it. I may just stick to trying coconut or goats milk yogurt. Thanks for the info, dd is not real keen on eating tart things, especially off a spoon, and it sounds like I would need to incubate it for a long time to create any firmness, thus making it really tart. So much thought for these little bugs!<br>
ps. moonbeem, I actually did today, I took the olive oil, combed it through her hair and combing her scalp, and brought her in the shower with me. Then shampooed it out. She is still real greasy, but it does look better. And did you mention the frozen bm b/c of my ridiculous stash of bm on our website ? (we just got a new freezer just for the bm, and I just had to show it off)
 

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I've tried it before. It won't set, the proteins are too small to tangle up and set.
 
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