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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, to make a REEEEALLY long story short. I have a 16 yr old daughter who my ex had custody of for the past 4 years...along with my other 4 kiddos. Well, she ran away this week ..he is an abuser....now it looks like he is finally giving up! He is talking about giving me custody of her this weekend. I will be traveling to the US to get her. She was homeschooled for years before he got custody. Has been in school for a few years now..though they knocked her back a grade when placing her in school (for spite of hs). So, she wants to make the best decision...whether to stay in the US with my parents and finish out this year or...come to Canada which she prefers...and either homeschool out this year or maybe another alternative??? She definately wants to finish school to get a diploma...not sure how homeschooling works here though....can you get a diploma still ...can she take some classes and some HS???? I just don't know how it works here as I am a new Canadian and this was sprung on me last night...am looking for some help so if ANYONE has any please...and she has been in an abusive situation so I want this to be as smooth as possible..she is a very free thinker and art minded person...if this helps...thanks...will look forward to replies...I leave tomorrow....oh btw..I am in Quebec.
 

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In Quebec, highschool only goes up to grade 11. She may very well be in her last/second to last year. After highschool - she can go to CEGEP - which is free and very much like community college. Even if she does not formally finnish high school - she may be able to get in as a mature student in 2 years/get her GED. I know there are cyber, diploma granting-public schools in Ontario - I do not know if they apply to/in Quebec. I think not - but you could try googling "Independant learning Centres" to see what you find.<br><br>
Also, at 16, she does not legally have to go to school - which is good because you will not have to answer to anyone. (Quebec is one of the least homeschooling friendly provinces - they insist on regular evaluations, for example).<br><br>
Do you speak French? It can be very difficult for you or your daughter to find work in Quebec - which is relevant to a 16 yr old. Ontario may be a better bet (and if you are in Montreal, the border is only about 1.5 hours away). Good luck.<br><br>
Kathy
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Kathy~ this info is a great help....I didn't realize they only went up to 11th grade. I have checked online some today and saw about CEGEP and we actually have one just a short distance from home here. Unfortunately, I speak little French but am learning..she speaks none which is a concern. Come June we will be moving....not sure where yet as we are looking for a piece of land to move onto..but thought QC looked like the best homeschool friendly place but maybe not then eh...? And we have been looking at Ontario too. Came here from BC last year...and LOVE it there, but am staying in the east for family reasons...yes, I like to answer to anyone as little as possible and....relaxed...unschooling approach. So, thanks again for your help and enlightening me about QC<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I lived in Quebec until I was 24. I moved to BC - which was great - but expensive (and with so many people wanting to live there, competition for jobs was fierce), I moved to Ontario (near Ottawa) at 29, and have been here 6 years.<br><br>
There are some pro's to Quebec - including the free CEGEP, the funky lifestyle, and, outside Montreal, the cheap land.<br><br>
Negatives: it is a big brother-y sort of province, and the politics can get real old.<br><br>
I live in Eastern Ontario - which is about 2.5 hour from Montreal. Speaking French here is an asset, but not crucial. It is close enough to both my and DH families that we see them about every 2 months - which is cool. The land in my area is dirt cheap, and really fertile (St. Lawrence river valley). It can be a bit red-necky around here, though. Good school and homeschool environments. If you are the urbanite sort, Ottawa is a fantastic town, though the rents/mortgages reflect that.<br><br>
Kathy
 

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See, I'm in Quebec and I don't know anyone in my big group who has ever had to face testing and that's homeschoolers who have left school and those who have never gone. In fact the homeschooling law is very loosely written and works to the advantage of the family and not the board of education.<br><br>
Here's the law in Quebec:<br><br><i>COMPULSORY SCHOOL ATTENDANCE<br><br>
Compulsory school attendance.<br><br>
14. Every child resident in Québec shall attend school from the first day of the school calendar in the school year following that in which he attains 6 years of age until the last day of the school calendar in the school year in which he attains 16 years of age or at the end of which he obtains a diploma awarded by the Minister, whichever occurs first.<br><br>
1988, c. 84, s. 14; 1990, c. 8, s. 2.<br><br>
Exemptions.<br><br>
15. The following students are exempt from compulsory school attendance:<br><br>
.......<br>
4) a student who receives home schooling and benefits from an educational experience which, according to an evaluation made by or for the school board, are equivalent to what is provided at school.</i><br><a href="http://www2.publicationsduquebec.gouv.qc.ca/dynamicSearch/telecharge.php?type=2&file=/I_13_3/I13_3_A.html" target="_blank">http://www2.publicationsduquebec.gou...3/I13_3_A.html</a><br><br>
Your DD is old enough to be out of school. But even if she weren't there's no requirement of a letter of intent under Quebec law so as long as she's not being pulled from school in Quebec they don't even need to be notified. The loose nature of the law (evaluation made by <b>or for</b> the school board) has allowed parents to argue succesfully that they made the evaluation for the school board. And there's no testing requirements and "educational experience equivalent to what is provided at school" is really open and allows for a ton of leeway.<br><br>
This is from the HSLDA (Homeschool Legal Defense Association - a Christian organization I don't belong to, but they have done some of the groundwork on getting people to know the laws):<br><br><i># The Education Act is not clear and does not define all of the requirements for parents, nor does it set out a set procedure for exemption and school boards vary as to their policy. It is important to remember that policy is not law. There are however, several principles that can be derived from the Education Act and the interpretation of that Act as outlined above:</i><br><br><br><i>1. There is no requirement that parents give notice to a school board or the government of their intention to home school their children if they are not contacted by the school board.<br><br>
2. The family does not have to seek prior approval for home schooling.<br><br>
3. Home visits or assessments by school boards as a condition for home schooling is not required by law.<br><br>
4. "Evaluation" does not mean a test administered by a government school.<br><br>
5. The right of a principal to report a family to Youth Protection is for situations involving truancy or absenteeism and not for legitimate cases of home schooling.</i><br><br><a href="http://www.hslda.ca/provlaws.asp?prov=qc" target="_blank">http://www.hslda.ca/provlaws.asp?prov=qc</a>
 

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I have friends in Gatineau who claim they had their kids tested (usually privately - not by the school board) to fulfill the "evaluation" component. It could be they are interpreting the legislation differently/ playing it safe<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"><br><br>
Not to nitpick...but the need for evaluation is not the most homeschooling friendly:<br><br><i>"a student who receives home schooling and benefits from an educational experience which, according to an evaluation made by or for the school board, are equivalent to what is provided at school."</i><br><br>
I certainly wouldn't want to discourage - or mislead anyone though. I will edit my original post to say "evaluation" instead of testing.<br><br>
In any event, at 16 it is a moot point. Glad your DD is with you, and welcome to Canada to both of you!<br><br>
Kathy
 

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Hmm...I'm in the Outaouais region and never have run across anyone who has had any involvement with the school board and evaluations. Even those who have pulled their kids out of school and are known to the board to be homeschooling.<br><br>
Did your friends pull their kids out of school? If so it must have depended on what the principal of the school they pulled them from was like. If their kids have never been to school then they never needed to inform the board of their existence. There's no requirement to let the board know you won't be choosing school.<br><br>
Everyone's experience can be so different, can't it? It's sometimes hard to come up with a blanket statement on how easy or hard a place can be when it comes to homeschooling. All it can take to make it hard is one fool on the board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nicolelisa~ yes, that is the law I read online last week or so and thought it sounded pretty lose. I homeschooled in the US for several years and in a state that required an evaluation by a certified teacher...it didnt have to be a TEST, but could even be a portfolio and an evaluation of it by a teacher saying the child was reaching THEIR potential. It was lose in a sense...I mean we had certain evaluators that we went to that were open to unschoolers, relaxed learning etc. So, all was well. But it looks as if Ontario is a bit stricter?? And yes, I agree that she is old enough to be out of school. However, upon her request she would like to have a REAL diploma...she does not want the GED..this is what she says not Mom. So, for homeschoolers in Canada how do they get their diplomas?? She would like to have it I 'think' in case she decides to go to university or art school or?? So, would she get a diploma then through CEGEP or could do it online? Is this the same type of diploma as what she would get in the actual public school?<br><br>
Kathy~ I would love to know about the area you are in...as I say we are looking for land....nature....with homeschool friendly..like minded folks...anyway...not sure exactly what area you are in but know around the area possibly...we came through there maybe on our way from Vancouver Is.<br><br>
Thanks all...
 

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Hi Nicole: I don't mean to fight online. Really, I don't. My info was mostly anecdotal, anyway. To answer your question - most parents I know in Gatineau did pull their children out of school. They did have their children tested (privately) - and but maybe that stemmed from their own worries about the gov't and evaluation. Maybe they were just being pro-active. Who knows! Glad you and your friends are having no problems.<br><br>
Naturespirit: I live half way between Ottawa and Cornwall. It is about 50 minutes to Ottawa. We bought our house (1900 farmhouse and 1/2 acre) for about 82,000.00 5 yrs ago. If I were to buy the same peice of property now, it would probably cost about 130,000. Several acres of land alone should run 10,000 - 30,000.<br><br>
It is quite rural, and can be a little red-neckish - although most people are quite friendly. We go to Ottawa often, and DH works there.<br><br>
The land is farm land - once a deciduous forest, but now it look a little like the praries. Flattish, with a few trees. We are about 20 minutes north of the St.Lawrence and about 45 minutes south of the Ottawa river.<br><br>
I would definately google Quebec cyberschools or Quebec distance Ed. if she wants a diploma, but does not want to attend a brick and mortar school.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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Oh no, Kathy, I didn't think you were arguing. I hope I didn't come across that way, either. We're just sharing our experiences and those of our friends. It is hard sometimes without those all important facial expressions, isn't it.<br><br>
Your land sounds quite awesome, by the way. It sounds like you're in a great area - it's nice to have a city near by.<br><br>
Nancy, I'll echo Kathy; I think if she wants a diploma and doesn't want to go to school I'd look into cyber schools. The f'ed up language laws in Quebec may actually prevent her from attending a bricks and mortar school and still doing well. In Quebec unless one of your parents was schooled in Canada and in English (and have all the paper work to go along with it) you have to attend school in French. If you arrive from a different country (in your Dd's case, The States) and neither of your parents were schooled in Canada (and in English) then you don't qualify for English school. So I'm not sure whether you or your ex-husband were schooled in Canada but that might factor into her decision when it comes to schooling.<br><br>
And I forgot to mention in my first post just how sorry i am for all your DD has gone through and how glad I am she is fidning a safe place with you.
 

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I was going to mention the language law as well. And I believe the parents have to be schooled english in Quebec, so being from another province wouldn't exempt you (unless they changed the law but that is what it used to be). They could also make it hard for your daughter to even get an equivelancy unless she was fluent in french.<br><br>
tara
 
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