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I am interested in learning out to make my own candles at home. Are there any Mama's out here that can recommend a good site or book to help me get started??? TIA!!
 

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I am a beekeeper and have made value added products from beeswax. I am not a big candle maker, but have done some. This is a great link:<br><br><a href="http://www.fao.org/docrep/w0076e/w0076e13.htm#4.11.2" target="_blank">http://www.fao.org/docrep/w0076e/w0076e13.htm#4.11.2</a><br><br>
Scroll down to "4.11.2 Candle makin2"<br><br>
It is described rather technically, but it is good information. Hope this helps!
 

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Wow! That's a great site. I was just coming here to post about parafin candles. I used to make and sell these a few years back. I would make the chunk style ones. I'm interested in making candles again and I have all the supplies and molds to do it still minus the wax. I keep seeing soy and beeswax and now it seems parafin is taboo. I guess I'm out of the loop, but it seems like a recent thing. Is this true? And why is it not ok to use? Is it an unrenewable resource? Is that where the 'para' comes in to play.<br>
What kind of ordinary house candles do you buy, how much do they cost? Does anyone have any good links to buying wax in bulk? I like the parafin because it seems so versatile and you can really get creative with it, but now I'm not sure what to make with the intention of selling.<br>
Any thoughts?<br>
And to the OP , I wish I knew what to say, but I'm kind of new to the process again too as it's been so long.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>izzysmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8402215"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I keep seeing soy and beeswax and now it seems parafin is taboo. I guess I'm out of the loop, but it seems like a recent thing. Is this true? And why is it not ok to use?</div>
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parafin is a petrolium product. so..... yeah, not the most "green" thing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
any other candle making tips? i did a search and this was the only thread i found! surely there are more mdc mommas who make their own?<br><br>
i recently was gifted an old candle making set, and as i'm weird and have kept my spare candle bits for ages, i'm all set except wicks! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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I started with a kit from michaels and experimented with difffernt types of candles using the 2" votive molds, so I wouldnt waste wax messing up big ones... then when I got the little ones right I bought more wax, bigger molds and made big ones! Found lots of ideas online too. Having the temperature of the wax just right makes a big difference...
 

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I think that beeswax candles get a bad rap. People see them in stores and they're so outrageously expensive that nobody ever thinks of making their own, like they're some kind of amazingly exotic luxury item. But you can buy beeswax blocks straight from the beekeeper (check ebay) often for under $5/lb, shipped. Paraffin is cheaper, but you need to add stearate and other things to it to make it work right, and it doesn't have that glorious smell that 100% beeswax does. And it drips.<br><br>
Another bonus with beeswax candles: they make fabulous gifts that absolutely _everyone_ loves. I usually make ten pounds' worth every year, and I have gifts for every last teacher, mailman, secretary, notary, babysitter, and person who's done me a good turn for way less than $2 each. I have a few self-wicking molds (from Betterbee.com and MannLakeLtd.com) so all I have to do is walk past the candle table every couple hours, pull out the cooled candle, pull up the wicking, pour the melted beeswax out of the cheap coffee pot that's sitting in a crockpot full of water (which keeps it at the right temperature) into the molds and walk away. It's the ultimate in low-pressure no-brain crafting.
 

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I love beeswax, as well. It is much nicer to melt and repour than other candle wax, and it smells soooo good!<br><br><br>
To make (or re-make! ) candles from old candle wax:<br><br>
1. Collect the wax in an old can (I use an old Costo-sized Crisco can, but a 5-lb coffee can--or any can about that size--would work)<br>
2. Place can in saucepan, and add enough water to saucepan to come at least half way up the side of the can.<br>
3. Bring water to boiling. Reduce heat to Medium, and stir frequently until wax is completely melted. (DO NOT LEAVE WAX UNATTENDED!)<br>
4. Measure mold to determine how long your wick should be. Tie one end of wick around a sharpened pencil. ONLY TIE A SINGLE KNOT, OR IT WILL BE REALLY DIFFICULT TO REMOVE!! (I use an empty orange-juice concentrate can for my mold. If you open the can from the "wrong" end with a can opener when you're making the juice, you can use the white "zip strip" to open your mold when the candle has cooled.)<br>
5. Pour melted wax into mold. Place filled molds in a place where they will be undisturbed for at least 24 hours. Hang wick over mold, making sure wick is centered.<br>
6. Let mold sit, undisturbed, for at least 24 hours. There will be a deep "hole" in the middle of the candle. Pour more melted wax into hole and let sit for another 24 hours. (Repeat if necessary.)<br>
7. When candle is completely hardened, remove from mold. (You may have to peel the orange juice can off of the wax.)<br><br>
You can scrape any spilled wax off of counter or stove top, and the pan washes up in dish soap and water.
 
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