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I'm investing about $100 in canning supplies to save us money over the winter. I'm pretty sure we'll make our money back in 1-3 yeas because we have access to free pears in our yard and tons of free apples around us. But I also want to try my hand at pickles, because I love them, and pickling cukes are very cheap now. I can't find a recipe for pickles that don't use sugar though, unless I want to ferment them for six weeks! Is there a way around this? I've searched in the ball canning book as well as online but to no avail. I love pickles but we never buy them because they ones that aren't filled with crap are so expensive. Help!
 

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<a href="http://www.freshpreserving.com/pages/all_recipes/215.php?recipe=21&recipID=209" target="_blank">http://www.freshpreserving.com/pages...21&recipID=209</a><br>
sweet pickles always have sugar. dills generally don't.
 

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I made some dill pickles (actually sliced cucumbers-- maybe whole pickles do need the whole 6 weeks?) recently with whey to ferment them-- and although they were meant to be finished in 6 weeks I ate them all in the first 10 days because they were really yummy and more-ish. I have yet to make a batch that lasts 6 weeks although I'm sure they get better and better with age.<br><br><br>
Zoe, mama to Thomas 01-06
 

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I was thinking the same thing Josie. The dill pickle recipe I use does not have sugar in it. I usually make only one batch of dills because we don't eat much of them. OTOH the bread and butter pickles do have sugar in them and we eat them a lot. I think I made 24 quarts (some split into pints and given as gifts) last summer and we have one jar left.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Dill pickles is what I'm looking for. I don't actually like the sweet pickles. So I'd have to buy the package? I searched but I couldn't find the ingredients in the package. It also seems, according to the recipe, that you have to keep it refrigerated. Is there a recipe for dill pickles without sugar that doesn't require refrigeration?<br><br>
Thanks for the help!<br><br>
Edited to add: ok, so I found the ingredient for the packet and it's got sugar! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><a href="http://www.freshpreserving.com/products/ball__simple_creations__kosher_dill_pickle_mix/9.php?page_id=22" target="_blank">http://www.freshpreserving.com/produ...php?page_id=22</a><br><br>
Is it really impossible to do pickles without sugar?<br>
The fermenting seems to require even more equipment and time and I don't want to have to buy any more than I am already purchasing. I guess we might just do without pickles this year.
 

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Here is a link to a recipe very much like the one I use;<br><a href="http://www.thatsmyhome.com/general/polish-dill-pickles.htm" target="_blank">dills</a>. I slice and blanch the pickles first though by salting them, covering htem with ice and sticking them in the fridge for a few hours. This draws out the extra moisture so they are cripsy <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>serenetabbie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11620647"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Here is a link to a recipe very much like the one I use;<br><a href="http://www.thatsmyhome.com/general/polish-dill-pickles.htm" target="_blank">dills</a>. I slice and blanch the pickles first though by salting them, covering htem with ice and sticking them in the fridge for a few hours. This draws out the extra moisture so they are cripsy <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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yay thank you! Can I use kosher salt for "canning salt"? Also can I use apple cider vinegar for white vinegar?<br><br>
Also does anyone have a good recommendation for a water bath canner? I want to order one today. Can the rack that holds 7 quarts, for example, also hold 7 pints?<br><br>
Thank you!
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MiriamF</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11620701"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">does anyone have a good recommendation for a water bath canner? I want to order one today.</div>
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Check thrift shops, yard sales, Craigslist, and Freecycle first - they are sooooooooooo cheap and frequently available used. I really wouldn't buy a water bath canner new when I've seen so many used ones (when I wasn't looking for them, of course) - I have two large ones, and probably paid a total of $2 for both of them...<br><br>
I would consider buying a new pressure canner, but that is different.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MiriamF</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11620701"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">yay thank you! Can I use kosher salt for "canning salt"? Also can I use apple cider vinegar for white vinegar?<br><br>
Also does anyone have a good recommendation for a water bath canner? I want to order one today. Can the rack that holds 7 quarts, for example, also hold 7 pints?<br><br>
Thank you!</div>
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Kosher salt is okay but the salt measurements are for canning salt, and since kosher salt is more coarse, you won't be able to measure it accurately. Apple cider vinegar would change the taste, but as long as the Ph level remains the same, it should be okay. (What I mean is that you want to make sure your vinegar has 5% acidity.)<br><br>
A water bath canner is just a large pot. Any large pot will do. The only thing you need to be careful about is that you have something in the bottom of the pot to keep the jars from resting directly on the bottom.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>velochic</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11623736"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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A water bath canner is just a large pot. Any large pot will do. The only thing you need to be careful about is that you have something in the bottom of the pot to keep the jars from resting directly on the bottom.</div>
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they aren't supposed to rest on the bottom? oops. why not?
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>josybear</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11623820"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">they aren't supposed to rest on the bottom? oops. why not?</div>
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The direct heat can crack the jars and also you need the space underneath so that the water can flow under the jars for even processing.
 

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I use Kosher salt, since that is what the mennonite lady at the bulk store suggested. She claims it is the same thing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">:<br><br>
I did use ACV for one batch one year, and the color was oddly browninsh and it did change the taste. Now I just use plain vinegar in the dills because of that. In the bread and butter pickles it seemed to work fine either way.
 
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