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<p>Do you think there are any real benefits to freezing stock over canning it? I just started canning my stock and have found the convenience of it being ready to use with no thawing to be a huge benefit. Of course it didn't dawn on me before to freeze stock in vacuum bags that I could drop in the pot to thaw. Instead I was freezing it in jars and it was taking up too much space and was a PITA if I didn't plan ahead and thaw it.</p>
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<p>So now I'm wondering if there might be any specific benefit of freezing it, other than saving the work of canning.</p>
 

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I would totally go for canning over freezing if i had a pressure canner. Nutrition-wise, i cant think of any real difference between the two.
 

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<p>That is one of the things I was wondering was any nutritional differences. But since it's just stock which I cook for a very long time anyway I couldn't see much difference in the additional processing time for canning it other than it is at pressure obviously.</p>
 

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<p>I would can it if I didn't have to deal with the hassle of the pressure canner.  Freezing is so much easier for me at this point.</p>
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<p>I say go for it!</p>
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<p>I am more comfortable freezing it from a food safety standpoint, home canned meat products scare me.  I'll tell you a good trick for the thawing time-  I freeze mine in ice cube trays then bag them.  Just measure the volume of your trays (ex 2 oz cubes) and then you know how may per recipe.  They thaw wayyyy faster than a big 2 cup chunk, and it will help encourage you to use them up to throw one in here, one in there, especially if you make a lot of stocks.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter #6
<p>See I don't think freezing is safer at all, because freezing does not kill all microorganisms. </p>
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<p>As far as ice cube trays, ugh I'd rather can.</p>
 

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<p>If I had a pressure canner, I'd much prefer to do that than freeze it.  I hate taking up room in the freezer if I don't have to.</p>
 

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<p>I have a pressure canner, but I just prefer to freeze it. I usually make stock once a month, and I make enough to last until we make the next batch.</p>
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<p>I just hate dealing with the pressure canner and all that, I prefer to pour and freeze personally.</p>
 

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<p>I might can really big batches if I had a pressure canner. But, I found that even large frozen pieces thaw pretty quickly in a sink of hot water. Then, any ice chunks left don't take long to melt in the soup pot. Not my favorite thing to mess with when cooking, but it works.</p>
 

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<p>I do the ice cube tray thing but it ultimately means I hardly ever have stock - no room in the freezer. Just one batch of stock takes up soooo much room, especially in ice cube format. I am looking forward to my pressure canner, and stocks is one big reason. Finally, I'll have plenty and it will be my own instead of the crappy grocery store stuff.</p>
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<p>Not sure why anyone would be scared to can broth? I mean, of course you would be following the directions for it - I don't think anyone mentioned, say, canning in the dishwasher or something. If you wouldn't pressure can your own stuff, do you also avoid store canned foods? It's pretty much the same thing except you have to trust someone else's process and ingredients instead of being able to trust your own.</p>
 
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Discussion Starter #11
<p>I just did 7 quarts yesterday, I can't imagine how many ice cube trays and how much level shelf space it would take to freeze all that.</p>
 

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<p>I can mine.  I hate waiting for stock to thaw and my freezer is pretty full.  I will usually can as much as possible and then freeze the small portion left over. </p>
 

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<p><br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>laohaire</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283611/canning-vs-freezing-stock#post_16097323"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I do the ice cube tray thing but it ultimately means I hardly ever have stock - no room in the freezer. Just one batch of stock takes up soooo much room, especially in ice cube format. I am looking forward to my pressure canner, and stocks is one big reason. Finally, I'll have plenty and it will be my own instead of the crappy grocery store stuff.</p>
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<p>Not sure why anyone would be scared to can broth? I mean, of course you would be following the directions for it - I don't think anyone mentioned, say, canning in the dishwasher or something. If you wouldn't pressure can your own stuff, do you also avoid store canned foods? It's pretty much the same thing except you have to trust someone else's process and ingredients instead of being able to trust your own.</p>
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Not that I'm scared, just overly cautious I guess.  I don't have a pressure canner, but I do have a chest freezer, so that of course also affects my personal preference.  Caveat- I've never canned anything in my life LOL.  I'd like to learn but it's tough to find a good resource other than a book.  I've been looking for an extension class or something, but those fill up within seconds! </p>
 

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<p>I can mine, but I'm usually canning stock when I'm already canning meat, so I have the pressure canner out anyway.  I don't have room in my freezer to put stock in there.</p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>plantnerd</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283611/canning-vs-freezing-stock#post_16101726"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p><br>
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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>laohaire</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283611/canning-vs-freezing-stock#post_16097323"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I do the ice cube tray thing but it ultimately means I hardly ever have stock - no room in the freezer. Just one batch of stock takes up soooo much room, especially in ice cube format. I am looking forward to my pressure canner, and stocks is one big reason. Finally, I'll have plenty and it will be my own instead of the crappy grocery store stuff.</p>
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<p>Not sure why anyone would be scared to can broth? I mean, of course you would be following the directions for it - I don't think anyone mentioned, say, canning in the dishwasher or something. If you wouldn't pressure can your own stuff, do you also avoid store canned foods? It's pretty much the same thing except you have to trust someone else's process and ingredients instead of being able to trust your own.</p>
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<p><br>
Not that I'm scared, just overly cautious I guess.  I don't have a pressure canner, but I do have a chest freezer, so that of course also affects my personal preference.  Caveat- I've never canned anything in my life LOL.  I'd like to learn but it's tough to find a good resource other than a book.  I've been looking for an extension class or something, but those fill up within seconds! </p>
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<p>This site is a GREAT resource and uses the most current approved methods.  <a href="http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/" target="_blank">http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/</a></p>
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<p>Start with boiling water bath canning (which you cannot use for stock) and can things like dilly beans and jam. Those are easy and have a wider margin for error. <a href="http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/uga/using_bw_canners.html" target="_blank">http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/uga/using_bw_canners.html</a></p>
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