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<p>My son is almost 16 months old and very tiny and skinny. His ribs and shoulder blades poke out. He was 6 lb 11 oz when born and gained weight very rapidly for the first couple of months.  Since about 4 months, he has started dropping off in weight. I was making fantastic milk, even pumping for another mother's baby who was the same age. When both of our babies started solids at 7 months or so, I stopped pumping for her thinking my son would start gaining with the extra milk and food. He just keeps dropping off the chart and the last couple of months has actually lost some weight. I am getting concerned.</p>
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<p>The doctor is mildly concerned, but cannot find any problem. We had his iron levels tested and they are normal. It is not a growth hormone problem because he is gaining well in height and is in the 50th percentile. He is healthy and has never had any diet issues such as colic or gas or mucousy stools or any other reason to believe he might have an allergy or intolerance. I am still breastfeeding and he pees a ton. When he's not nursing, I give him whole goat's milk on the side. I switched from water to try to give him more calories. He has hit all of his milestones just fine and seems otherwise healthy, energetic and happy. He is muscular and VERY strong. He's walking and almost running. He just looks like a little skeleton. He is the same size as a 9 month old baby and weighs 18 lbs, unlike my daughter who was always in the 95th percentile. The doctor can't find anything that might be wrong with him and presses me to give him more calories, that he's just not getting enough. WIC is very concerned and pressing the calorie issue, saying I need to feed him more.</p>
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<p>The problem is, I can't give him more calories. I do everything I can think of! My son eats a lot of food and I feed him until he refuses to eat any more. I kept a food diary to see what he eats and I'll include it at the end of this post for anyone who wants to have a look. I keep snacks out for him all day. He poops a ton - diaper-filling poops about two to five times a day. I add butter to everything. I am constantly offering him things and he seems to eat a lot, but he is starting to look so skinny to me. His legs are like little sticks. I watch him sleep with his ribcage poking out like a little starved child and it breaks my heart! Some mothers have advised I try to cut out some things from his diet because they believe it could be an intolerance from anything from dairy and wheat to beans but at this point, I am not willing to cut ANYTHING out of his diet without evidence that he has issues first because he really needs the calories.</p>
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<p>Anyone know what else I can try? Normally I would just say he's small and leave it at that, but I don't think it's normal to not gain weight at all.</p>
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<p>Here is his weight gain chart (there are no mistakes, he has been weighed by both the pediatrician and WIC). Our doctor uses the WHO chart for breastfed babies and so does WIC.</p>
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<p><a href="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v95/amberskyfire/shadey_zpsa1195534.jpg" target="_blank">http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v95/amberskyfire/shadey_zpsa1195534.jpg</a></p>
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<p>And here is a photo of my sweet, happy, skinny boy. The red marks all over his belly are plum juice. He just finished polishing off an entire plum which he loves.</p>
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<p><a href="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v95/amberskyfire/shadez_zps5487f05b.jpg" target="_blank">http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v95/amberskyfire/shadez_zps5487f05b.jpg</a></p>
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<p>------------------------------------------------------</p>
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<p>Food diary entries: (all food is organic)</p>
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<p>05/31 - Breakfast: puffed corn cereal, raisin oatmeal. Lunch: 1 slice deli turkey, whole wheat bread slice, 2 slices cucumber. Snack: 1 stick string cheese, toddler cookie. Dinner: cream cheese, teething biscuit, banana, buttered noodles.</p>
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<p>06/01 - Breakfast: raisin oatmeal. Snack: toddler cookie veggie bar. Lunch: cheese stick, slice of deli turkey, banana. Snack: rice cereal in a cup. Dinner: chicken casserole, cheese</p>
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<p>06/02 - Breakfast: oatmeal with raisins, buttered toast, cracker. Lunch: watermelon, pasta with olive oil, cracker, cheese. Snack: Greek yogurt and cherry smoothie. Dinner: burritos (beef, tortilla, sour cream, refried beans)</p>
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<p>06/03 - Breakfast: oatmeal with raisins, cream cheese, yogurt. Snack: toddler cookie. Lunch: lasagna, turkey slice, bananas. Dinner: burrito, turkey, lettuce.</p>
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<p>06/04 - Breakfast: oatmeal with raisins, rice cereal. Lunch: veggie bar, turkey, apple. Dinner: apple, peas sweet potato fries.</p>
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<p>06/05 - Breakfast: oatmeal, rice cake, yogurt. Lunch: diced vegetarian corn dogs, peas, cheese crackers. Snack: toddler cookie, rice cake. Dinner: beef, beans, peas, white rice. Dessert: watermelon</p>
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<p>06/06 - Breakfast: oatmeal, toast, honeydew melon. Lunch: veggie bar, rice cake, tomatoes, veggie chips, potatoes. Dinner: beef, beans, sour cream, peas.</p>
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<p>06/07 - Breakfast: oatmeal, melon. Lunch: whole wheat bread, turkey, honeydew melon, Snack: cheese crackers, cherries. Dinner: mashed potato, broccoli.</p>
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<p>06/08 - Breakfast: oatmeal. Snack: diced pear. Lunch: organic mac & cheese. Dinner: chicken casserole with whole grain, multigrain pasta and peas. Dessert: blueberries</p>
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<p>06/09 - Breakfast: pumpkin , veggie bar. Snack: cheese crackers. Lunch: whole grain bread, turkey, blueberries, cream cheese. Dinner: beef and vegetable stew, blueberries.</p>
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<p>This should give an example of what I feed him on a weekly basis. He won't eat avocado, but I can sometimes sneak some into some yogurt if he's tired and doesn't notice.</p>
 

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I'm no expert but his growth chart shows a decent curve With an upward trend, just lighter than usual. He's walking/running and that makes most kids stop gaining or lose a bit at first. The food he eats seems pretty well balanced (if a bit heavy on carbs) and offering a wide variety. My one suggestion is to include a hearty protein like eggs at every meal. It will add fat to his diet as well and should help get more calories in. Many kids eat their best in the morning and oatmeal doesn't pack as much of a punch as a couple of scrambled eggs would. Avocado is magic too btw. High fat, high calorie, super nutrient dense and optimal for growth and brain development.<br>
As for his pic, he looks pretty fit! He has baby fat on his arms but doesn't have the toddler belly - I bet lots of kidz dont. For what it's worth, my 2 year old girl who is 85+ percentile in weight has ribs I can count and her vertebrae are clearly visible even through a t shirt.<br><br>
In a nutshell I'd say switch some of the bread/noodles/rice cakes/oatmeal for more fat and protein, like eggs, meat, cheese, beans, avocado, etc. My kiddo also loves drinking smoothies (easy place for full fat yogurt and avocado to hide) and that could also help get more calories in. He looks pretty healthy to me though.
 

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<p>Thank you! That is very heartening. </p>
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<p>I increased the carbs in his diet because he will only eat so much of some things, so I can finish off with the carbs, which he prefers, to get more food in him For example, when he just won't eat any more beef and veggie stew, he'll still accept some buttered noodles or a slice of bread. It has been a way to sort of top him off if he's being picky. And the oatmeal was loaded with butter, so I was trying to give him more fats. Same with the cream cheese. </p>
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<p>This is from a few weeks ago and I've since been giving him eggs, almost one a day, since a friend showed me how to cook them so I can separate out the yolks. He's not old enough for whites yet. Hoping the egg does the trick. And I'll see if I can sneak avocado into more stuff!</p>
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<p>Freaking out like a first-time mom over here. So happy he looks healthy! Maybe he just looks skinny to me because I keep comparing him to all of the other babies and kids we hang around. :(</p>
 

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<p>It could very well be that he's just small!  I know you don't want to eliminate anything, but if you continue to be worried and he continues to not gain, removing wheat (and other glutenous grains) would be the first thing to try.  I have heard many, many a tale of a parent removing wheat from the diet of a child who was off the bottom of the charts, to have them immediately gain lots and lots of weight.  If they are sensitive or truly celiac, gluten will prevent them from absorbing nutrients in food.  There don't necessarily have to be other symptoms like rashes or digestive problems for celiac/gluten sensitivity to be a problem.  Just something to keep in mind.</p>
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<p>I would also do a little research into phytates (also called anti-nutrients), which are mineral-blockers present in some foods like grains and legumes and nuts.  They bind to minerals in food and block their absorption.  I mention that because oats are particularly high in phytates.</p>
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<p>I think you're definitely on the right track with the goat milk and adding butter to everything.  I would aim for super high nutrient density foods - butter, egg yolks, cream, grass-fed beef, sardines, coconut oil, fish roe if you have access to it.  I would also consider supplementing with fermented cod liver oil.  </p>
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<p>Best of luck!</p>
 

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<p>I also wouldn't cut anything out, but you could provide alternatives that are high calorie and high fat.  Be careful not to give him too much saturated fat as it can lead to all kinds of problems down the line.  You can try making dense cookies with coconut oil, nut butters, oats, and bananas (there are all kinds of recipes out there).  You could try full fat coconut milk in his cereal, or making smoothies with nut butters, guacamole, hummus, etc.  These are good high calorie/protein ways to get him extra snacks without adding too much sugar or sat fat.  What about full fat greek yogurt, that could also help with the gut flora.  </p>
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<p>I know it must be impossible, but try not to make yourself crazy with worry, It sounds like you are feeding him pretty healthy food.  My DS was a serious pooper at that age, while many kids ere getting down to once or twice a day he would often go five or six.  He has a reputation for always needing and poop chance at every party, outing, or at every sitter.  My Pediatritioin recommended yogurt daily, and also said he will probably always poop more than others.  He still does 2-3 a day at 3 years old.  </p>
 

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Your son sounds like my 20mo old dd and your concerns echo mine because while my eldest was always 75% and up, this child's weight is 15% or less. We just saw the pedi for her constant loose stools and weight. He basically suggested probiotics and that she's growing fine just small. My DH is tall and fit and I'm short and average build, so that plus our diet just makes for lean kids. But I'm still going to reevaluate our diet because <b>luckiest</b> made me realize we probably eat too much phytate rich foods. And kids need the vitamins and minerals equally as much as calories, if not more so.<br><br>
Also to keep me from worrying so much, I try to take my DH's pov regarding health. If the child is playing and running and eating, they're healthy. Because a sick or starving child simply won't have the energy. And it sounds to me, by your description, that he's doing well.
 

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<p>Thanks for the help! I have never heard of phytates. I never knew such a thing existed. I'm going to look it up and see if we can make some adjustments to his diet that don't cut out too much. How long should I wait to see results from such a change? Weeks? Months? Is it like an allergy where you have to wait a few weeks to see any kind of change or should he start gaining right away?</p>
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<p>Yes, he's very active, thankfully. He and his sister spent the entire day running around the house and screaming and chasing each other. I've never seen a happier boy. Trying to temper my worry as much as I can but...well...you other mamas know how that goes. :)</p>
 

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<p>And if I am breastfeeding, do I have to cut these foods out of my diet as well? Does it affect him through my breast milk?</p>
 

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I don't really know so much about how long it takes for anything to leave the system, but here's a bump for that. I'd rationalize that the phytates could make my breast milk slightly less nutritious if it's impacting my ability to absorb the nutrients I need. But again, that would be my rationale.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>amberskyfire</strong> <a href="/community/t/1386336/cant-get-15-month-old-to-gain-weight-help-advice#post_17400696"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><p>He's not old enough for whites yet.</p>
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<p><span>This has me curious.  Is there a family history or reason to believe there wwill be an egg allergy?  I know there are a million recommendations that change daily regarding food introduction, but I started DD on egg yolks around 10 mos and like a week later the whole egg.  We have no food allergies in the fam, just a gluten sensitivity for DH, dairy sensitivity for me, and dairy/oats for DD - none of us produce antibodies so it's truely just a sensitive/non-digestion issue.</span></p>
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<p><span>Quote:</span></p>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>luckiest</strong> <a href="/community/t/1386336/cant-get-15-month-old-to-gain-weight-help-advice#post_17401175"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><p>It could very well be that he's just small!  I know you don't want to eliminate anything, but if you continue to be worried and he continues to not gain, removing wheat (and other glutenous grains) would be the first thing to try.  I have heard many, many a tale of a parent removing wheat from the diet of a child who was off the bottom of the charts, to have them immediately gain lots and lots of weight.  If they are sensitive or truly celiac, gluten will prevent them from absorbing nutrients in food.  There don't necessarily have to be other symptoms like rashes or digestive problems for celiac/gluten sensitivity to be a problem.  Just something to keep in mind.</p>
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<p>I would also do a little research into phytates (also called anti-nutrients), which are mineral-blockers present in some foods like grains and legumes and nuts.  They bind to minerals in food and block their absorption.  I mention that because oats are particularly high in phytates.</p>
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<p>This is exactly what I first thought.  Inability to digest and absorb nutrients won't always show up with red flag symptoms.  Although if you are like me you watch poop like a hawk.  That's a major indicator for me - large stool volume - that something isn't being processed.  Ideally you poo far less than you eat which would mean your body was able to absorb every last nutrient possible.  I can tell based on my DD's poo just what she can eat and do well on, and what she might like but isn't necesarily doing her any good.  Didn't know about the phytates specifically but I do know that those things can often feed the bad bacteria in the gut which can also lead to poor nutrient absorbtion - especially a high carb diet in general.  The things we crave are often signs that a sensitivity is there as well.  I CRAVE carbs, like big time, and I eat way more than I should, but I'm very petite.  When I'm good and I cut out carbs, or at least the sugary simple ones, after a week or so of withdrawl I feel SOOOOOO much better!  And I don't eat at odd hours and still feel famished.  So I've really tried to be sure DD doesn't fall into this trap by ensuring she eats way more veggies than I ever did (which means I now eat them too) and loading up on the healthy fats - coconut oil is my number one, especially since we're dairy free, I sub coconut milk for cow milk in everything.  That and avocadoes.  Surprisingly easy to hide in smoothies and I've even heard from my vegan friend they make a fabulous chocolate pudding.</p>
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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>amberskyfire</strong> <a href="/community/t/1386336/cant-get-15-month-old-to-gain-weight-help-advice#post_17401383"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><p>And if I am breastfeeding, do I have to cut these foods out of my diet as well? Does it affect him through my breast milk?</p>
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<p>I know from having to eliminate dairy/oats from my diet to accomodate DD that certain foods do have a big impact.  You could just eliminate from your LO's diet but if there'ss no change you may to eliminate it yourself as well.  I do cave to the temptations of milk chocolate at work, and in the long run I pay for it with sleepless nights afterwards.   Oh well, sometimes you just need a chocolate fix<span id="user_yui_3_10_0_1_1373595367981_716"><img alt="2whistle.gif" id="user_yui_3_10_0_1_1373595367981_715" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/2whistle.gif" style="width:22px;height:15px;"></span></p>
 

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My daughter has been 95th percentile since birth. She was and still is very tall and higher body fat. My son however always has low body fat. He is almost 2 and super healthy. I looked at your photo and he looks totally normal to me! I thought you might like to hear that.
 

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<p>do you feed him full fat yogurt? that might help.</p>
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<p>sorry- I hadn't read your entire post when I asked that-- so he doesn't like yogurt? When my guy was that age he ate tons of yogurt- especially if I put a little maple syrup in it. does your son like yogurt? I think what you are feeding him sounds great! Just add as much fat as you can,</p>
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<p>If he still is not gaining weight and you feed him lots of fat I would see out another doctor or natropath or some other professional opinion if his doctor is not givng you any assistance. Good luck</p>
 

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Aw, he is a skinny little thing! Just like my ds1 was. I think it's great that his eyes seem clear and he doesn't seem to have dark purple circles under them. That plus being on track with milestones tells me he's overall very healthy. In this case, I would cut out ALL grains and up the fat. After he plumped up some i might add back soaked/sprouted grains.
 

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<p>Sassy, yes, our family has a history of allergies to all kinds of things on both sides including tomato, berries, milk, wheat, mosquitoes and avocadoes. I'm being very careful with what I give him for those reasons. I go by the recommendations on Kellymom on what to give him.</p>
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<p>Snapdragon, yes he loves yogurt. I feed him yogurt now and then. It just didn't happen to be during the week that I did that food diary. He gets all kinds of dairy including yogurt, cheddar cheese, cream cheese, goat milk and sour cream. </p>
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<p>I can try to cut out grains but it is going to be VERY, VERY difficult. My husband is autistic and eats only specific foods. Before I had kids, I was into raw food, then had to switch to vegan, then vegetarian and finally go back to eating the way I usually did because of the way my husband eats. I simply could not prepare two meals back then and there is certainly no way I could do it now. We have had to eat what my husband eats (not unhealthy, but does contain grains) so I may have a little trouble making separate meals for my son. I am stretched beyond thin right now just trying to take care of all three of them. It may be a total impossibility for me. :( Maybe try feeding him more of those baby foods from the store. I hate to do it, but it may be necessary for him to be on a partial baby food diet for a while.</p>
 

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<p>Goodness, you do have a lot on your plate right now!  Nothing wrong with using convenience foods; some of those pouch baby foods are awesome.  </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>amberskyfire</strong> <a href="/community/t/1386336/cant-get-15-month-old-to-gain-weight-help-advice#post_17405237"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><p>Sassy, yes, our family has a history of allergies to all kinds of things on both sides including tomato, berries, milk, wheat, mosquitoes and avocadoes. </p>
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<p>I can try to cut out grains but it is going to be VERY, VERY difficult. My husband is autistic and eats only specific foods. </p>
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<p>Not to add even more to your plate...but you might want to add a book called Gut and Psychology Syndrome (Natasha Campbell-McBride) to your reading list.  There is a direct link between the health of the gut and state the brain.  The book explains the link, including information on family histories of food allergies, and has a dietary/detox protocol for healing the gut and thereby easing symptoms (and in a lot of cases eliminating issues completely) of ASD and food allergies (and a long list of other maladies).  I have a friend right now who is seeing great progress in her autistic son from being on the diet.  There are a lot of great testimonials out there for it.</p>
 
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