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Discussion Starter #1
Just got a Radian XTSL, but am waiting to install it until we get a seat protector.<br><br>
It will be rear installed for our one year old. Looking for a seat protector that will protect our leather upholstery from indentations, etc.<br><br>
I read reviews on BRU of one seat protector that actually permanently stained the leather seats (Supermat by Sunshine Kids surprisingly), so want to avoid any that do that, so please let me know which ones to steer clear of as well.<br><br>
Are there any that protect the back seat from toddler feet? I see some that fold down for rear facing (presumably so they don't flop over on your infant), but are they still high enough that they protect the seat back from little toddler feet?
 

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Those are not recommended as they have not been tested with car seats and could interfere with the car seat staying properly strapped in in the event of a car accident.<br><br>
As for toddler feet, take off babies shoes before you put them in the car seat.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Even some car seat manufacturers make seat protectors. Eddie Bauer has one, etc. But the Sunshine Kids (the maker of the seat I bought) Supermat seat protector, is the one that I've read bad reviews about permanently staining leather seats because of the backing material. The other protectors on the market are all similar. I just want one that doesn't have a backing that ruins leather seats.
 

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SKJP also makes the Mighty-Tite, but I don't think many CPSTs would give that a thumbs-up... Those seat protectors can lead you to believe your car seat is installed more tightly than it is, since their "grippiness" can prevent the seat from sliding back and forth, even when it's not actually tight enough. It's just a safer bet not to use any after-market products with your seats that have not been safety tested.<br><br>
I don't have a good suggestion for preventing indentations. I have a pretty decent, new car that I try to keep in great shape. However, I figure my DS will be in a car seat or booster for 9-10 (or likely more!) years, which will cover up the indentations until the poor car is over a decade old and trashed anyway.<br><br>
DS is 2, and will RF hopefully at least 2 more years, which means lots of dirty shoes near the seat backs. We take off DS's shoes if they're dirty. I've seen families put old T-shirts around the seats (if you have a van or SUV that has folding seats that would allow that).
 

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i had been wondering about this since we are in the market for our 1st minivan...i searched here about those seat protectors & everyone says they are not considered safe but some folks suggested the spongy stuff for lining cabinets to protect the seats from stains.<br><br>
i dont think there is much we can do about the indentations though?
 

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What kind of leather seats do you have? Unless you have a pretty high end luxury car your leather is going to be really tough and it won't be an issue, installing a carseat may leave dents in the seat but they will perk back up when you remove the carseat. I have had at least one kid rearfacing for almost 7 years now and I haven't had an issue with dirty feet on seatbacks, I just take shoes off when we get to the car, which my kids always do within 5 minutes anyway. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> The leather is actually really great for RF kids, even if you don't remove shoes, because you can just wipe them off.<br><br>
Trust me, I have had my van for about 3 years now and I have had carseats installed in the same places almost constantly, but if I take them out within a few hours (or a day if it's really cold) the indentations are gone.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ellairiesmom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15374153"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">i searched here about those seat protectors & everyone says they are not considered safe but some folks suggested the spongy stuff for lining cabinets to protect the seats from stains.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that"><br><br>
The protectors give a false sense of how tight your seat is. Around here you can get the cabinet lining stuff at the dollar store and it's a much better idea <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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To protect the seatback itself, I cut a hole in an old towel and put it over the back seat headrest, so it hangs down over the seat. I put it on AFTER the carseat is installed properly, and then tuck the bottom edge in around where the foot area of the carseat hits the seatback.<br><br>
Its easy to take off and wash when needed and works great. You could do something similar with whatever kind of fabric you want. If your headrest comes off, you could instead cut 2 very small holes and poke the headrest through to hold it on.<br><br>
As for under the carseat, I wouldnt put anything there other than a very thin recieving blanket if you REALLY think you need something there.<br><br>
ALL of the store bought seat protectors that I have seen at seat check events interfere with the install. I've had seats seem very tight, but if you mark the belt where it was buckled and re-install without the seat protector to the same mark, the seat is very loose.<br>
They are often thick or stiff too which messes up the install. So yeah, not safe.
 

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We have the Eddie Bauer protectors in our car. We both have perforated leather seats, and I'm so glad we have the protectors or else I would be trying to figure out how to remove vomit, sour milk and other nasties from the tiny holes. They have a panal that you have to shove into the space between the bottom and back of the seat, and that holds the protector in place. I honestly find it perfectly safe, although I know it isn't tested. I think we got them at Target.
 

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The official recomendation from NHTSA that is in the CPS Curriculum is that non-regulated products should only be used if the child restraint manufacture makes the non-regulated product and permits use of it with their child seat. These items (seat protectors, extra padding, head thingys, strap covers, etc.) are all considered non-regulated products because there are no rules that govern them, no one crash testing them, no one except whomever makes them saying they are safe to use. I've seen many, many car seats that seem snug until I pull that mat out, and now they are loose. Or where the mats interfere with the lower anchors and/or seat belt. I would personally not use one with my children. Additionally, most car seat manufacturers will void the warrenty of your seats if they fail in a crash and you were using a non-regulated product. The mats as well as the shelf liner can melt into the seats in high heat, causing more damage. I always feel bad for those parents! Here they were so worried about their seats, but now they have totally ruined them by using something that wasn't recommended in the first place.<br><br>
I have leather seats and very tightly installed seats. The dents from the seats are usually gone within 24 hours. We have had this car for 3 years now. I recently had car seats out of my captains chairs for about a week and honestly, it was about a day before the dents were totally gone. I know it's frustrating for parents, to have a new car with leather seats and be told these things are recommended. But they really aren't, and neither are other non-regulated items. You can do something like hang a towel or mat from the back of the head restraint for dirty and muddy shoes on a rear-facing toddler. I'm sorry! Best of luck finding a solution that works for you!
 

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I have a Crown Vic. The leather is really durable and the carseat indentations are gone within a few hours or a day. We don't use anything between the seat and the leather. My folks are fulltime RVers and have a really nice rig. When DS needed to ride in it, I installed his seat in a captain's chair (front passenger) and used a really thin towel (it was worn--I recognized it from my childhood) to protect the super soft and nice leather. That indentation didn't last long, either.<br><br>
I don't think any of those aftermarket protectors have been crash tested. And my kiddo's not a crash test dummy, so I'd rather not put him in a situation where he might have to serve as one.
 

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If you're worried about dirty seats, try a sheet or a t-shirt (if you have captain's chairs). You can put a very thin layer, like a single layer of t-shirt, etc under the seat too, if you're worried about crumbs and indentations and such. Definitely don't use the rubber mats; those are too thick <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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