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I'm in the process of applying for the University of Oregon for next fall. I already have my two year degree. I can not for the freaking life of me decide on my major.<br><br>
My interests: Journalism, Communications, Psychology, Law, Politics, Business, Accounting, Family Services, Intelligence, etc.<br><br>
One of the major things that I want to think about is being able to do some of my work from home, so that I can be near my kids a few days a week.<br><br>
From that angle, can anyone reccomend anything to me? The perfect job to do from your home? I would like a small amount of travelling, I do enjoy going into the office, I'd just like the option of staying home 2-3 days. I would like to make a decent salary.
 

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My SIL is a part time accountant for a big insurance company. She works 3 full days and is home the others. I think she makes pretty good pay but that is because she decreased her hours when she had her son so they based her part time pay on her full time pay. She feels stuck at the job because of this: she doesn't think anyone else would hire her part time for as much $$. I think a lot of companies have similar deals for working moms.<br><br>
Good luck to you. How exciting to be starting a new path in life! I hope you find someting you really enjoy.
 

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Techie fields are great as they are often already set up to support telecommunting and flexitime. and they tend to pay well and support freelancing/consulting.<br><br>
Based on your interests, you might want to look into organizational managment, software enterprise architecture, business process architecture, etc. Honestly, your interest in psychology, communications, business, accounting, etc will be more important in these fields than programming. I have a BS in international affairs and an MA in Anthropology - but I find information architecture and software development suits me because I can focus on how people actually USE the software - the processes the software replaces, the business case for moving to technology, etc.<br><br>
And techie jobs are often (but not always) more accomodating of non-traditional schedules. Frankly, if you work with a bunch of software developer divas who demand work schedules of 3pm - 5am from home three days a week, any less drastic will be considered pretty warmly...<br><br>
Good luck!!<br><br>
Siobhan
 
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