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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So we just got a new Roundabout!!


I installed it rear facing and I have the seatbelt threaded through and LATCH attached but I'm still worried about the back of the seat being secure. The front base is in so tight that my car rocks when I shake it. But the back of the seat doesn't seem tight at all. I can lift it up a bit from the backseat. I can't tether it down because there is nowhere to attach by the floor of the backseat (There are tether hooks for when I turn it forward facing though). Am I just being paranoid or did I install it wrong?

Also, does the actual seat detach from the base? It seems like transferring my sleeping dd would be impossible.
 

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Are you saying that you've installed it using both the seatbelt and the lower anchors? You MUST NOT do that- use one or the other. Seriously. Go fix that now.

On the Roundabout (and other Britax convertible seats, but almost no other seats), the top tether can be used rearfacing- you don't need to have a tether anchor, you just need to find a solid place that doesn't move, such as the legs of seat in front. You can use the extra strap with a D-ring on it to wrap around and tether (read your manual).

The seats on convertibles, including the Roundabout, do not detach like infant bucket seats do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok, only Latch is attached now and the tether is connected. It's as tight in there as can be while still keeping the right angle...Excuse my oblivion, but why is it so detrimental to have both the seatbelts and the anchors attached?

Thanks for the links! I will still get it checked out by a CPS tech.
 

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It's bad because it's not tested that way. Britax tests the seats with one or the other, because every car has a seatbelt and all new cars have LATCH. By using both, you may interfere with the safety of the seat by not allowing it to move the way it needs to move in a crash or by putting too much crash force on the base of the seat.

Sure, it might seem like a good idea, but by not following the directions of the manufacturer, you are setting yoru child up as a crash test dummy instead of teh way the testing has shown the seat to be safe. Additionally you void your warranty and any claim you might have if hte seat does not perform properly in a crash.
 
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