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I've been cooking with cast iron skillets for about a year. I got all my skillets from my grandmother so they have been around for a while, but hadn't been used in years. I've seasoned them numerous times, and it never seems to stick. I coat with in oil, and place in the oven. Most dishes aren't that bad, except for eggs. Those things are the bane of my day, and of course dd loves them, and wants them twice a day. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"> I don't use soap, I just don't know what I'm doing wrong. Any suggestions?
 

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They're not going to be non-stick. You'll just have to get used to scrubbing them <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">. As long as you don't use soap, you shouldn't have to worry about re-seasoning very often.<br><br>
A tip on seasoning, though: use a "bad" oil like vegetable, or even mineral (make sure the mineral cooks into the iron well, though). Olive and other low-fat oils burn off quickly. The best seasoned pans I have were used to cook over campfires on girl scout trips for the better part of my pareent's 25 year marriage, so short of building a fire in your backyard, my other tips are for cleaning the pans that aren't seasoned by years of rugged use.<br><br>
I keep Brillo pads under my sink and use them to clean egg off. They're cheap and make EASY work of anything stuck-on, and with cast iron and stainless steel, you don't have to worry about that precious teflon surface <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:. You can also try putting a tiny bit of baking soda into the pan and filling it with water. Then put it on the stove and heat it to almost boiling. The egg should just wash right off afterwards.
 

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I have to disagree with Charmie. My 10" cast-iron skillet is now beautifully seasoned and as long as I don't use too high a heat, nothing sticks. Not eggs, not spilled bits of cheese from a grilled-cheese sandwich, nothing.<br><br>
I melt a lil butter before cooking eggs, but I think the heat level is crucial; too low and your food might get soggy, too high and blammo, everything welds right on to the pan. But particularly with eggs, sticking is a sign that you're cooking them on too high a heat, IME.<br><br>
After cooking I use hot tap water and a "dobie" nylon scrubber or a stiff-bristled plastic brush. I then usually add a very light coat of oil (I really like coconut) while the metal's still warm and hang the pan up with the inside facing the wall so no cat hairs or anything stick to the oily surface :LOL
 

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We cook lots of eggs in our cast iron and no sticking. I can even bake muffins in a cast iron muffin pan and have no sticking.<br><br>
Cristco rubbed into the pan in a VERY thin coat and baked on and repeat a couple of times works wonders.<br><br>
We rinse in hot water and should food get dried in the pan we use a brush to loosen.
 

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I add this problem and I learned to cook at a lower temp when I am making my eggs, I also lightly grease before I cook, no more sticky eggs.<br><br>
When it comes time to clean, I have course salt I use and it takes off any burnt sticky stuff.
 

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I have no trouble with eggs sticking in our cast iron. I find that keeping the temp low for eggs is really important - in fact, I'll take the pan off the heat after doing my bacon and let it cool for a few minutes.<br><br>
Charmie, I'm trying to figure out what you mean by "low-fat" oil. Last I checked, all oils have the same amount of fat. And, olive is a good oil for high temps - it's smoke point is 410 degrees F (it appears to smoke lower than that because it's volatile aromatics start evaporating, but it's not actually smoking).
 

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I wanted to add that although I followed the standard advice of "grease lightly and bake upside down" several times, what really seasoned my pan wonderfully was cooking lots & lots of greasy foods in it. Pumpkin seeds toasted in coconut oil, fried eggs -- we ate a lot of fried eggs for about a week, LOL -- grilled cheese sandwiches, vegetables sauteed in butter, bacon, hamburger. After that, it was really nonstick & things washed off beautifully.<br><br>
If I were to start seasoning a new pan & didn't feel like tempting Fate in the form of a clogged artery, I'd probably do the oil-lightly-and-bake every night for at least a week before using it. Maybe 2.<br><br>
And DH (the dishwasher at our house) knows not to let my pan touch soapy water, under threat of conniption :LOL
 

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I have cast iron that is 30 years old and so well seasoned that we washed it in soapy water, and it doesn't bother it a bit.<br><br>
But, the best thing to use to clean cast iron is salt!
 
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