Mothering Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18395089/" target="_blank">http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18395089/</a><br><br>
Someone posted recently about juice being as bad as soda (I believe it was in regards to obesity, since it is pretty obvious that 100% juice at least has vitamins and such that pop doesn't)...<br><br>
But I believe that the overuse of drinking juice is contributing to children's rotten teeth. I know sooooooo many little kids that drink juice juice juice juice and more juice.<br><br>
People have even commented about our DS drinking water like it's such a novelty! "Oh look, he's drinking WATER!!!!!!"<br><br>
(He does have juice once in a while btw, but not as his overall beverage).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>karina5</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7991476"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">People have even commented about our DS drinking water like it's such a novelty! "Oh look, he's drinking WATER!!!!!!"<br></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
That was also our experience in Europe, everyone asked all the time if DD didn't want some syrup mixed with her water <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br>
Overhere people find it special that DD eats plain yoghurt instead of the yoyo baby ones.<br><br><br>
Carma
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
From the article:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">... and more bottled water or other drinks instead of fluoridated tap water, Dye said.<br></td>
</tr></table></div>
I thought most parents give their childeren fluoride drops instead when they don't drink the fluoridated water. Is there really solid proof that eating fluoride helps reduce cavities? Sofar I only found that fluoride at best delays getting first cavity, but that you eventually get the same amount. We don't do fluoride because it is a poison, we just brush regurarly.<br><br>
Carma
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
I don't do fluoride. I have had one cavity in my life.<br><br>
I have no intention of giving my children fluoridated water or fluoride supplements. We only need trace amounts, and trace amounts occur in foods.<br><br>
I read that fluoride makes bones and teeth HARDER by replacing the magnesium in them. This has a side effect of making them brittle.<br><br>
My main concern is fluoride being linked to digestive and neurological issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
my dd drinks lots of water also and we get the same reaction. she drinks juice too but we have a juicer and we make our own, i figure if she's going to drink it it should be from organic fruits and not pastureized (sp?)...we don't do dairy though so i don't get the yogurt thing. as for flouride, we have her brush with an organic, flouride free toothpaste and she has perfect teeth accordingto her denist. it makes me so sad to see little kids, some even younger than my dd with metal in their mouth from fillings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
My husband has been fending off cavities by rinsing his mouth out after he drinks anything sweet (juice or tea with honey).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,177 Posts
So much of how a child's teeth are going to develop is also genetic (or at least related to other factors besides what they eat and drink). My daughter is almost 4 and goes in on Wednesday to get extensive cavities filled and probably 1 if not 2 of her front teeth pulled. She has never had juice in her life. The only "sticky" food she has ever had is raisins. We had fluoridated water while I was pregnant, but since she started drinking water it has been unfluoridated. We do use a fluoride toothpaste for her now. She does eat a lot of yogurt.<br><br>
When her front teeth came in they had a brown line straight across them on the front and back (dentist told me about on the back too). He told me that stress during pregnancy can weaken teeth and we definitely had that. Her teeth are just weak. My hope in filling all of the cavities and really giving them a good cleaning is that we can reduce the amount of bacteria so she doesn't have as many cavities in the future.<br><br>
I'm just waiting for the lecture from the dentist (a new one for all of this work) about her having night nursed until she was 18 months or so. Not many dentists are up-to-date on that research so that should be fun.<br><br>
I just wanted to say to not condemn a parent when you see a child with a mouth full of cavities or fillings. You have no idea what the circumstances were that caused those cavities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,279 Posts
If my daughter is drinking juice (which she does frequently, but she's not a big drinker) it's always at least mixed half w/water. I'm hoping this will cut down on the "side effects"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,270 Posts
I'm a little confused by this because, in my understanding, all simple carbohydrates have the same effect, sugar is no different. Wouldn't it be simple carbs in general that cause cavities and not just juice or sugar intake?<br><br>
I find it very interesting that in theory, parents nowadays are more vigilant than ever about dental care, brushing, flossing, etc. and babies are getting more cavities. Seems like there might be a bigger explanation there? Maybe I'm wrong though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
On the flouride note, I have flourosis of the teeth, and all of my back teeth are cracked and most of them chipped. My front tooth on the left up top has a HUGE crack in it...I think flouride is ok topically, but should never be ingested.<br><br>
Personally? W/ DS1 who b/c of the amino acid formula he takes, is at higher risk for cavities. We had his teeth sealed. We also give him xylitol at least once a day.<br><br>
Steph
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
I think a lot of it as to do with heredity. I have NO CAVITIES AT ALL. Nothing. They even grew in straight!<br><br>
I also NEVER brushed my teeth as a kid and went to the dentist exactly once that I can remember. So it wasn't for having great dental hygiene! Gust good luck and maybe flouridated water, dunno.<br><br>
My parents? Besides totally dropping the ball on dental habits? AWFUL teeth. Falling out, all placky and nasty and gross. The kind you don't want to look at while they are talking. Same situation as me, except maybe no flouridated water as kids?<br><br>
I think we are also forgetting that bad teeth used to be the norm before more modern times (like the last 50 years or so, I'd guess)... Americans hold dental hygiene as an indicator of class as much as anything else. i.e. the idea that poor homeless people have gappy brown rotten teeth, and movie stars have white shiny veneers. Just an onservation. Not that I want my DS to get cavities to fight the classist establishment! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
Tina,<br><br>
My parents both were born after water fluoridation began. I am resistant to cavities, as is my mother and her mother (no fluoride). My father has horrible teeth.<br><br>
I know my saliva is good. I think that has something to do with it. When I lick a cut, it heals super fast with no scars (and I have never had a cut become infected). Cuts that my parents didn't let me lick but were treated with disinfectants took MUCH longer to heal, and left scars.<br><br>
Also, if there is any food residue in my mouth after eating, I will keep making saliva until it is all washed away. (If I eat something just before sleeping, this is a problem, because I keep having to swallow the saliva and therefore I can't fall asleep until it is done.) My DH doesn't have this characteristic, and he gets cavities a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Pepperdove</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7999729"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think a lot of it as to do with heredity. I have NO CAVITIES AT ALL. Nothing. They even grew in straight!<br></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I agree! I remember my cousin NEVER brushed her teeth, ate really crappy food, tons of pop, etc, and has never had a cavity.<br><br>
Meanwhile, I practiced really good dental hygiene, etc, and have a mouth full of fillings.<br><br>
In fact I think heredity is the main factor.<br><br>
When I brought up juice, I realize it isn't the end-all, be-all of course, but it something that I've noticed that little kids do drink a TON of juice, and I just don't think it's good. Plus, as the article mentions, eating habits are not that great.<br><br>
In my OP I said that people were amazed to see DS drink plain water. Well people also think I'm a "mean" mommy that he doesn't get to eat candy and sweets (raisins to him are like candy). He is not quite 2, and doesn't realize what he's missing, and yes, he will get to eat that stuff someday, but why rush it. *HE* doesn't care! kwim??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
Yeah, I also didn't brush my teeth regularly for years at a time as a child. I didn't get any cavities in all that time.<br><br>
I actually got my one cavity when I had braces. It was so hard to keep them clean, with all those crevices. When the braces came off, the cavity was found and filled, but it was very shallow and I didn't feel a thing. That was 13 years ago.<br><br>
I DO have another filling, but I don't count that. The orthodontist put a tiny hole in my front tooth while ripping off the braces to remove them. The dentist filled it with tooth-colored stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Mom2Phoenix</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7998556"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm a little confused by this because, in my understanding, all simple carbohydrates have the same effect, sugar is no different. Wouldn't it be simple carbs in general that cause cavities and not just juice or sugar intake?<br><br>
I find it very interesting that in theory, parents nowadays are more vigilant than ever about dental care, brushing, flossing, etc. and babies are getting more cavities. Seems like there might be a bigger explanation there? Maybe I'm wrong though.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I think the juice is mainly a problem if they sip from it all day. Drinking a glass of juice once a day is not the big problem I think.<br><br>
Good teeth are inherited but also external factors play a role. Antibiotics for mom during pregnancy or for the child before the teeth come in make the teeth stained and/or weaker. Also eating good food helps with stronger teeth (calcium etc.).<br><br><a href="http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/GeneralPediatrics/tb/1862" target="_blank">Antibiotic Linked to Incomplete Development of Tooth Enamel</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Administration, of tetracyclines including doxycycline, tetracycline, and minocycline during the second or third trimester of pregnancy can cause staining of the teeth of the childhood and up to a 40% depression of bone growth (especially of the fibula in preterm pregnancies) (Rendle-Short, 1962; Kline et al., 1964; Kutscher et al., 1966). However, following in utero exposures to tetracyclines, rapid compensatory bone growth has been observed once antibiotic treatment is terminated (Cohlan et al., 1961).</td>
</tr></table></div>
from: <a href="http://www.fetal-exposure.org/ANTIBIOT.html" target="_blank">ANTIBIOTICS AND PREGNANCY</a><br><br>
Maybe the antibiotics play a role with the current increasing cavities in infants/toddlers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,329 Posts
Hi - can I put on my public health professional hat for a moment? Yes, heredity is a factor in dental caries, but this report showed that in the last 10 years, the number of cavities among very young children has increased. This means that something in the environment has changed, since children's genetic makeup has not changed that quickly. This leaves a few likely culprits - such as changes overall in food and beverage consumption, and/or reduction in fluoridated water consumption (yes, exposure to fluoridated water reduces tooth decay in the population overall.) Kids are consuming more processed food, sugary food and juice, and are less likely to drink fluoridated water, so it's a reasonable explanation for the trend in cavities. Please remember, though - this study is for the population as a whole, so your individual experience might be quite different. It doesn't mean that EVERY child who drinks juice all day will get cavities, or that EVERY child with a healthy diet will be cavity-free.<br><br>
Edited to add: Here's an extensive scientific article from the CDC about the use of fluoride:<br><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5014a1.htm" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5014a1.htm</a> I'm not interested in a debate about fluoride, but I wanted to provide a reference for those who are interested in the scientific data.<br><br>
Hat off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Diane B</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8002024"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">and/or reduction in fluoridated water consumption (yes, exposure to fluoridated water reduces tooth decay in the population overall.) Kids are consuming more processed food, sugary food and juice, and are less likely to drink fluoridated water, so it's a reasonable explanation for the trend in cavities. Hat off.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
About the fluoride, I found this article at the MDC website <a href="http://www.mothering.com/articles/growing_child/child_health/fluoride.html" target="_blank">MDC on fluoride</a><br><br>
Carma
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,933 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Carma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8001450"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think the juice is mainly a problem if they sip from it all day. Drinking a glass of juice once a day is not the big problem I think.<br><br>
Good teeth are inherited but also external factors play a role. Antibiotics for mom during pregnancy or for the child before the teeth come in make the teeth stained and/or weaker. Also eating good food helps with stronger teeth (calcium etc.).<br><br><a href="http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/GeneralPediatrics/tb/1862" target="_blank">Antibiotic Linked to Incomplete Development of Tooth Enamel</a><br><br><br>
from: <a href="http://www.fetal-exposure.org/ANTIBIOT.html" target="_blank">ANTIBIOTICS AND PREGNANCY</a><br><br>
Maybe the antibiotics play a role with the current increasing cavities in infants/toddlers.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I doubt it. I was given tetracycline as a small child, and my teeth are badly stained. However, I have NEVER had a cavity in my whole life, and I am in my 40s. One of my dentists, who had seen a lot of tetracycline teeth, said that in his experience, they were unsightly but incredibly hard and resistant to decay.<br><br>
All my siblings needed lots of fillings when we were kids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I think we all know people who are exceptions to the rules (as I posted about my cousin) but that doesn't change overall findings.<br><br>
I see this a lot. ANd it can be used so negatively, aka, "I don't BF my son and he is never sick, and meanwhile my nephew who is BF is sick all the time, therefore BFing is bad."<br><br>
This irks me.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top