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You don't need to convince me, but I would like to convince my mother that this is a bunch of BS.<br><br>
She read somewhere that if a baby isn't introduced to cereals by 6 months of age, they are at much higher risk of having Celiac Disease (intolerance to wheat gluten).<br><br>
I know that the AAP says 6 months exclusively and that I fully abide by it, (except for the sugar <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> in the meds Jett had to get due to surgery.)<br><br>
Thanks, Mamas!
 

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I googled <b>celiac breastfeeding</b>.<br><br>
Neat stuff.<br><br>
THis article says bf exclusively delays/prevents celiac. and there were other articles<br><a href="http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Spa/3156/celiac.htm" target="_blank">http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Spa/3156/celiac.htm</a><br><br><br>
See also<br><a href="http://www.drjaygordon.com/faqs/cerjuic.htm" target="_blank">http://www.drjaygordon.com/faqs/cerjuic.htm</a><br><a href="http://www.askdrsears.com/faq/bf4.asp" target="_blank">http://www.askdrsears.com/faq/bf4.asp</a>
 

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she's got it the other way around. early introduction of solids can aggravate or contribute to food allergies, including sensitivity to wheat gluten/celiac. what the causative factor is is another question, but delaying solids can definitely help in protecting the neonatal digestive tract as babies are born with physiologically 'leaky' guts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I know for sure that I heard, in 2000 or 2001, that babies had to have cereals introduced between 4 and 6 months, for maximum 'anti-allergy potential' so the misinformation is out there, no doubt. I don't know where she read it though.<br><br>
MomTwice, thank you. I passed the links along to her. She's an avid reader, so no problems with her reading them.<br><br>
I've told her, in the past, about virgin guts and leaky guts, etc. She's just worried since she read something else.
 

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My son started rice at 4 months and has celiac's. It is genetic, so if your'e going to get it, you're going to get it no matter when you start cereal... Besides, Celiac's disease is an intolerance to wheat, rye, oats, and barley...none of those are found in any cereals the baby should be eating before 6 months...
 

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She definately has it the other way around. My MIL has Celiac Sprue and DH is at high risk for it (he's testing boarderline right now)- so I began researching this before we even became PG to see what i could do. Research indicates that the longer you breastfeed the better. Preferrably delaying solids as long as possible (even 9 months to a year) and then introducing non-gluten foods first and being very careful about not overloading the system with too much variety. Breastmilk should be 90% of a babies diet till age 1. Here is a link to check out! Good Luck<br><br><a href="http://www.lalecheleague.org/cgi-bin/aglimpse/33/mnt/WWW/lalecheleague.org/htdocs?submit=Search%3A&query=celiac" target="_blank">http://www.lalecheleague.org/cgi-bin...A&query=celiac</a>
 

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I know a woman who has celiac as well as all 4 of her kids. She didn't BF the first, the second weaned at 6 months, the third at 13 months and the fourth is still nursing at almost 1. All had solids pretty early imo. The first at weeks of age, the second and sub, probably around 4-6 months. It's genetic.
 

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My DS#1 has CD. I saw the info on CNN news last week (so your mom is not making it up). It was a new study. I did not read it but have been meaning too. Here's the link:<br><br><a href="http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/05/18/hscout525793.html" target="_blank">http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/heal...out525793.html</a><br><br>
It's just 1 study. Not sure that I'm convinced. I introduced solids at 6 months and DS stopped growing 1 month later. (bf'd for 2 years). I will definitely discuss with GI doctor before I introduce gluten to DS#2.
 

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Quick summary of the research in question (published in May 2005 JAMA) :<br><br>
- The children were high-risk for CD (genetic markers or family history).<br>
- They were followed to age 10.<br>
- The risk of developing CD was lowest if gluten was introduced at 4 - 6 months.<br>
- There was a 5-fold risk if it was introduced before 4 months.<br>
- There was a 2-fold risk if it was introduced after 6 months.<br><br>
Although this finding seems kind of "out there," it wasn't totally unexpected. It parallels the results of the 2001 study, which said that high-risk children who were introduced to gluten at 4-6 months had the lowest risk of Type 1 diabetes.<br><br>
I'm not sure what to make of it. Maybe there <i>is</i> some special protective effect, due to the state of the immune system at 4-6 months. OTOH, as the researchers themselves have pointed out, there could be confounding variables. For instance, the protective effect could depend on the child being exclusively BF, which is less likely after 6 months. Also, when gluten is introduced later, the parents might tend to start with larger servings, which might exceed some sort of threshold and cause sensitization.<br><br>
In any case, I'm looking forward to seeing more research on this subject. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Celiac disease is genetic--you pretty much have to have the genetic marker for it to have it, so when you feed your child solids doesn't really have much to do with it. Of course if you never feed your child wheat products at all, they won't develop the disease. My son had a positive blood test for celiac, but thankfully, the biopsy showed no signs of the disease, but we did tons of reading on the subject so we know what to look for.<br><br>
Luckily, breastfeeding does seem to have some kind of protective effect and often delays the onset of the symptoms of the disease.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>samuelsmom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Celiac disease is genetic--you pretty much have to have the genetic marker for it to have it, so when you feed your child solids doesn't really have much to do with it. Of course if you never feed your child wheat products at all, they won't develop the disease. My son had a positive blood test for celiac, but thankfully, the biopsy showed no signs of the disease, but we did tons of reading on the subject so we know what to look for.<br><br>
Luckily, breastfeeding does seem to have some kind of protective effect and often delays the onset of the symptoms of the disease.</div>
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If his labs are positive then he's got celiac. He just wasn't advanced enough to see intestinal damage yet.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Satori</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">If his labs are positive then he's got celiac. He just wasn't advanced enough to see intestinal damage yet.</div>
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Exactally. Celiac is genetic. Delaying solids won't cause it. There are people who show more symtoms but you can not show any symptoms and still have damage happening. Celiacs should not have *any* gluten regardless of if they show symptoms. If lab test sare positive it's celiac and gluten is out.
 

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I'm not quite sure that's true... The only thing the blood test can test for is antibodies against gluten, which could be gluten intolerance OR Celiac's (the blood test must also be done when gluten is in the system). The gold standard confirmation is a biopsy done when gluten has been in the system for 2+ weeks. Because I will not put my 1 year old through the biopsy and I am pregnant, we can not get an "official" Celiac's diagnosis. However, I have a confirmed gluten intolerance because of the antibodies that were present...my son has a diagnosis of gluten intolerance both because of his symptoms (FTT, eczema, great response to a g/f diet, etc. when eating gluten) and my positive antibody test. But my doctor will not put the official "celiac's" diagnosis on the chart without the biopsy. Until then, it's "gluten intolerance", which is not the same thing, but we were told to treat it as such until the day comes when we need/want the official diagnosis (those with g/i *may* be able to tolerate small amounts of gluten now and then whereas C's have to avoid all gluten. We treat our g/i as C's though because we don't know for sure yet).
 

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ugh! GI's drive me nuts, they tell you that you only have to eat gluten for 2 weeks, and I even had one tell me you only had to have 1 meal with gluten to see damage when its not true. You need to be on gluten for several MONTHS (as in 7+) which is why most people wont bother. You can also get the genetic test done and if your reactive to gluten and test positive for the gene then they can DX from that. I'm being tested tomorrow after almost 5 years of eating GF due to being extremely reactive to gluten and having other symptoms like osteoporosis (dx'd at age 27), dental defects, ect). Once I come back pos on the genetic test I can push to get dd tested because she's just as reactive but has been GF since she was 4 mo old with occasional trials and several mess ups that resulted in severe diarrhea. (dipstick baby sitter was feeding her Rice Krispies cereal without telling me, poor thing was a mess!) If anyone's interested you can get the genetic test though Kimball Genetics yourself or though your Dr. My insurance is covering my getting tested<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
ps: My dd was BORN with active celiac as was I according to my mom (she said my diarrhea started when she started me on cereal at 3 days old and lasted till I went GF at age 24). So delaying or starting early doesn't have much to do with it I think. dd didn't try ANY solids till 11 mo and we stopped after a month since she became FTT and we went back to EBF (under Dr's close eye) until 17 months when she finally started solids. So 2 very different starts, both have celiac. btw, we have several celiac's in my family all from my maternal grandmother (she had it) so we know the gene is there for it.
 

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Yeah, the several months thing is why I'm not doing the biopsy...I can NOT put my poor little baby through 7 months of torture and potential weight loss just for the sake of the test...he's finally on the charts for weight after being at or below the 1st percentile most of his first year until he was diagnosed. That, and it can take 2+ months to get rid of all the gluten in your system as well! I won't go back on gluten for the test either because I don't want my genetically predisposed new baby to get gluten through the pregnancy or breastmilk because I can't have it either...
 
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