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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry this is so long.

My DH has always struggled through life. He is a smart guy but often doesn't understand verbal directions or doesn't remember them or it takes a few minutes for him to comprehend what someone is saying. He coasted through school (after being held back a few times in grade school) by being a superb athlete. He was tested for all types of learning disabilities but did not qualify as having any. He avoids social situations that are not one on one as he often has a hard time keeping up with conversations. He often cups one ear as if he is trying to hear you even when you are up close and there are no distractions. He relies a lot on body language and context to tell him what people are saying. You can repeat the same sentence a few times with him still not understanding.

My youngest son, turning 4 on Monday, shows a lot of the same tendencies. He is smart (recognizes and names colors, shapes, letters, numbers, etc.) but he often just doesn't "get" what you are saying. He just has a total lack of understanding of what you are saying. Or he might understand but it takes quite a few beats for it to get through. He cannot follow multi step instructions. In public, I often have to use some type of hand sign for him to understand me or get up close and personal and repeat, rephrase, etc. I've been noticing the difference between his comprehension level and other kids his age for about 1 1/2 years but didn't know if it was a phase, or if it was just his personality, etc. I requested a speech eval from the school district (as it really lagged for him) but he tests on the low end of normal and he has really caught up a lot in the last 6 months. His hearing tests fine.

My DH started really seeing the similarities between himself and my son as did I. It is as if there is an intermittent block between their brain and their ears. Sometimes things get through and sometimes they don't. My DH doesn't want my son to suffer academically or socially like he did. As my DS is too young, he decided to start testing himself to see if there was some type of diagnosis that applies and if so, what we can do to support my DS academically. We know it isn't ADD or actual hearing loss or dyslexia and there are no behavioral problems.

Our DO sent DH to an ear Dr. this morning and the ear Dr. says it sounds like Central Auditory Processing Disorder. The ear Dr. is sending him to an audiologist.

I'm investigating this option as a strong possibility but it seems like a catch all phrase. I don't understand who a central accrediting agency is, what the typical testing process is, etc. Is there credible information out there? Does anyone have any other ideas?

Thanks so much for any and all info you might have.
 

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This is one of the things our 4 yr old is struggling with...and what you are describing is exactly what he deals with.

The nurse practitioner at the dev ped's office and OT both say that ds has symptoms indicating this, but that they can't test for it yet (or don't). His hearing is perfect, and he's very intelligent, but if you don't know him well, you might not get that.

DS has a tentative dx of Asperger's, has poor fine motor skills and weak hands, some gross motor delays/weaknesses, auditory processing issues, sensory integration problems...possible metabolic issues....etc etc.

We'll see how it goes, but I just wanted to share that what you describe w/your son is the same as what the OT and NP describe as APD.

hths

henrietta
 

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APD officially can't be diagnosed until around age 7, since the tests audiologists use aren't reliable before then. I think it's due to a mixture of kids not understanding the directions of the tests and their neurological system maybe not maturing until that age. In the meantime, even if the school is testing him as low-normal, you can always pursue a private assessment, since you still have concerns. That may enable you to either get therapy through insurance, or take the report back to the school if it indicates services are needed, and push them on it.
 

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In our jurisdiction, they don't usually test until 8. Fortunately, DS demonstrated an ability to perform the tests at 7 and we were able to screen it out. It was fairly easy (we only had to do the first level) and was similar to a regular auditory screen in the big soundproof booth.

There's some info about CAPD here:
http://books.google.com/books?id=DmU...age&q=&f=false
(about pg180)

A very thorough description is in The Mislabeled Child, by the Eides. CAPD is a very confusing diagnosis, IMO, because it underlies so many systems and can have some disparate and far-reaching effects. I had a hard time getting my head around it (still do).

You can find more on their blog by searching "auditory processing."
http://eideneurolearningblog.blogspo...ry-system.html
 

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Yeah... here they don't generally test until 7 or 8yo, but my 6yo has a prescription for an audiogram with as much of the CAPD testing "as tolerated" because he is gifted. Honest-to-God, I have no clue how that's a factor unless it has to do with him understanding what is being asked of him? No clue. We haven't gone yet.

But what you're describing is our problem with him, too. And now at 6yo, he's flagged for ADHD, but the audiogram prescription was a thing to rule out (as was a vision exam since some vision problems present as ADHD).

That being said, he IS old enough for the CAPD testing through the school district that is not a hearing test but a verbal comprehension test. I want to say it was called TAPS-3 (for kids from 4yo up). And that one showed a clear problem. It had 4 sections and he clearly bombed one of them. The other 3 sections of the test were in the "normal" range, but significantly below his overall level of functioning (based on other testing they did to him) which showed a clear problem.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by heatherdeg View Post
Yeah... here they don't generally test until 7 or 8yo, but my 6yo has a prescription for an audiogram with as much of the CAPD testing "as tolerated" because he is gifted. Honest-to-God, I have no clue how that's a factor unless it has to do with him understanding what is being asked of him? No clue. We haven't gone yet.

But what you're describing is our problem with him, too. And now at 6yo, he's flagged for ADHD, but the audiogram prescription was a thing to rule out (as was a vision exam since some vision problems present as ADHD).

That being said, he IS old enough for the CAPD testing through the school district that is not a hearing test but a verbal comprehension test. I want to say it was called TAPS-3 (for kids from 4yo up). And that one showed a clear problem. It had 4 sections and he clearly bombed one of them. The other 3 sections of the test were in the "normal" range, but significantly below his overall level of functioning (based on other testing they did to him) which showed a clear problem.
The testing DS did was in the audio booth with headphones, distinguishing between sounds, repeating rhythms and identifying which ear heard what. (IIRC, and I was sitting outside so couldn't see, could just hear). DS is also ID'd as gifted and ADHD and did it the week he turned 7, although I think the ADHD is just active young boy and SPD. The audiologist gave him an activity break at the mid point, so we did a fast walk up and down some twisty ramps and did some word games he likes to get the goofs out of him.

I think with a 4 year old they're going to be limited in ruling this out.

OP, are you anywhere near Washington State? The Eides are located there and would likely be the best place to figure it out or in.
 

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I am going through the same thing with my 4 yr old. He is working with a speech therapist who is knowledgable in processing disorders. So it is a bit of a relief to know what is going on and that we aren't just imaging the challenges. I am also considering going on gluten free but it would be a huge step as he is a picky eater. I am doing the research and phasing out gluten so it is easier on me and my son. Any comments on the effectiveness of gluten free and processing disorders?
 

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Kids have a broad range of behavioral & developmental reactions to a wide variety of foods--not just gluten. And because gluten takes a few months to get out of your system, I would make any transition period brief so that you can get on with the task of being completely free quicker.

It's possible nobody on this board will have seen positive change to CAPD problems going gluten-free; but that doesn't mean you won't. My son's reactions to foods haven't been the norm, either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I posted this nearly a year ago! How time flies. He still has difficulty with some things but he seems to have learned coping skills. There are still times where it can be quite frustrating as you can say something over and over again and he just can't seem to understand what you are trying to communicate to him, even if it is a very simple concept.

He taught himself to read earlier this year and is currently working on learning addition and subtraction, again on his own. He is really blowing me away with how smart he is but he just doesn't seem to get concepts when you explain them to him. He has awesome social skills and wonderful hand/eye coordination and small motor skills. At this point, we have decided to take a wait and see approach.

Interesting about the dietary factor. How about tonsils/adenoids and their involvement? My ds has very large tonsils/adenoids. They don't go down even after removing dairy. I'm currently on an elimination diet and would hate to have to put him on one. But it is definitely a thought I'll have to keep in mind.

Thanks again for all of the input.
 
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