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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this in birth professionals but haven't gotten much of a response. I thought maybe someone might have a had a similar problem and could help me here.<br><br>
I am 9 days post partum from a very easy, uneventful birth, other than it being very fast. anyway, thursday I started having some abdominal discomfort and noticed in the evening that when I went to the bathroom things were a little different down there, something was protruding through the vag opening. I had something similar to this after delivery #2 and MW said it was a boggy cervix and that I needed to lie down and rest and things would go back to normal - it did and I didn't seem to have any more issues. But it has been a 2 whole days now and though I don't stay in bed all day any movement is pretty painful and if I'm up for very long I hurt worse. Has anyone had experience with a boggy cervix?? My bleeding was basically non- existant but has pick up in the last 2 days, so maybe I am overdoing it and just need to rest more. Any advice would be much appreciated.
 

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I just gave birth on Sunday and am in a similar predicament. (Cervical prolapse).<br><br>
My MW said to start doing kegels and to keep doing them... and doing them and doing them.<br><br>
I'm looking for a bit more advice too.
 

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Sorry, never heard the term "boggy cervix". The choice of the word "boggy" suggests that it's mushy, which is as it should be so I really don't understand the diagnosis.<br><br>
It sounds like you have a prolapse of some sort, if it is indeed your cervix that would be a uterine prolapse though unless your midwife has identified it as such it could be the bladder or even vaginal mucosa. Regardless, kegel exercises and pelvic tilts will aid recovery.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/privateeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="private eyes">
 

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I just posted in a similar thread. It is frustrating that there is so little support for this issue! I've found people don't like to talk about it, #1. Also, I thought it was just my OBGYN so I'm surprised to hear that midwives also seem to brush it off and just say to do kegels. When I was in that position I was having trouble figuring out what to call it, first of all, and had trouble finding information. I wanted to know more. I was freaking out thinking I'd always be that way and crying every day. Knowing that I just needed to do kegels didn't really cut it. It also takes a while to see results if you just do kegels. The good news is that you can see a lot of improvement and there are other exercises you can do along with the kegels. I'll cross-post my response from the other thread...<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Mama-mana</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11627879"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">There is a support group on here for Pelvic Organ Prolapse... I'll see if I can find the link for you in a minute. It can happen on the first birth, and it can improve a lot, so try not to freak out. I've been there... no information or support makes it worse. You don't necessarily need a pessary. My cervix was pretty low for a long time... It did finallly go back up to the normal position. Hormones help too. After I got pregnant and my uterus was heavy, it dropped back down a bit, but after doing the right exercises I'm doing a lot better again. My favorite one that my doula told me about is the knees/chest position. Basically you get on your hands and knees, but let your chest drop as close to the floor as possible. You want to get into a position where you can feel things pulling back up into place. It feels great. Do kegels at the same time. She also showed me another where you can scoot up against a wall, prop up your hips, legs going up the wall... kind of hard to describe, but it also uses gravity to help reposition. I don't do it as often because I don't think I'm doing it right. Since I can really feel things moving with the other one I spend my time doing it. Look at diagrams of the uterus... Envision it getting back into the position tipped forward toward your pubic bone. If things are "falling" it's probably tipping back and descending into the vagina a bit. The knees/chest exercise in particular helps tilt it back into the right spot!<br><br>
Okay, found the link:<br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=713732" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=713732</a><br><br>
Another great site is<br><a href="http://www.wholewoman.com" target="_blank">www.wholewoman.com</a> - It reminds me that good posture is important.<br><br>
I think some people have luck with a physical therapist that specializes in this, however, I had enough trouble getting my OBGYN to tell me more than "do kegels", "old women have that problem", and "I'm glad I had c-sections with my kids" that I pretty much gave up on the medical route and did my own research.</div>
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I'm sorry, having worked with a physical therapist who specializes in pelvic floor dysfunction I do not think recommending you start with kegels is a brush off. Physical therapy is usually the first place you start with pelvic floor prolapse, and the first thing the PT is going to do is teach you how to do kegels and pelvic tilts. Yes, for some women the road to recovery involves pessaries or surgery, but unless the prolapse is presenting a serious hazard pelvic floor exercises are the first step, especially when someone is only a few days postpartum!
 

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nashvillemidwife - My post wasn't directed at you. Both posters on this issue had also been told to do kegels and no other information. "It's just a boggy cervix," sure does sound like a brush off to me. I remember my delivery nurse commenting on my cervix and the OB on call saying "oh that will go back up". I had no idea what she was talking about at the time. My nurse was the only one who told me anything helpful about it, but I was confused and busy with my newborn at the time. Her sister had a prolapse and she was trying to tell me it would be okay. NO ONE else explained anything to me and when I brought it to the attention to my OB, she proclaimed from my lying down position that nothing was wrong, yet in the next breath said she was glad she had c-sections with her kids. When I told her I had to support myself to have a bowel movement, she said old women have that problem. Then she handed me a kegels handout and sent me on my way. Brushed off... yes. It is a very frustrating position to be in when you have this problem and no support or information to go on.
 

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the first post I didn't know what boggy cervix meant -- so didn't respond.<br>
There may be several reasons a mw called it that, and none of them a "brush off" it could be that she doesn't know another term for it, or that she doesn't want to say cervical prolapse because it can be such a charged term.<br><br>
something I was taught to do by a Brazilian mw who learned it from the grandmas who expected something more from a mw than the normal care belly banding as well as some massage<br>
- so yes kegels are important - as well as physically replacing your cervix with 2 clean fingers, the rest of hand folded up push your cervix back in and up a bit further than just inside- sort of like placing a tampon. yes it is a muscle thing and if you re-place the cervix then it is easier for the muscles to tug at it and not strain, but it is also a ligament situation as well and you can't get those to tighten up they shrink on their own- so to help the ligaments we do belly banding. We make sure the cervix is replaced and that you can feel the uterine fundus above the pubic bone, have a piece of fabric or a folded down twin sheet, or a commercial belly band , mom lays on the wrap close to a wall and walks her feet up the wall to help the uterus to be place upward then put a clean pair of rolled up socks or a rolled up cloth diaper between the sympathis pubis and the fundus trapping the fundus upward-- then wrap and tie the sheet tightly around holding the socks in place - what this does is help hold up the heavy uterus so that when the ligaments shorten and become thick again from their pregnant stretched out state they shorten closer to the prepregnant state rather than remaining partly stretched out.<br><br>
additionally we have moms avoid foods that may be constipating , or that cause straining in order to pass -- staying hydrated, eating fruits and veggies and magnesium oxide supplement,<br><br>
careful how you lift- use body mechanics - rather than straining to lift as the internal pressure can displace your uterus, so careful how you pick up your toddler , come down on your knees wrap your arms around the kido and then stand up using your legs, rather than bending at the waist and pulling the kido up---<br><br><br>
there are medical surgical things that can be done as an option but should not be considered until well after early postpartum
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you so much for the advice mwherbs, I will try the belly banding and see if it helps. I am curious as to why my mw said that all I needed to do was lay down and rest instead of telling me it was a muscle issue. I would have done things different with the last pp period and worn a support belt with this pregnancy and started a some support for this post partum period sooner than now. at least it's only been about 10 days now.
 

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I would say talk to her about it- maybe she feels that your muscles are strong and that staying down is her best answer-- staying down will keep gravity from pulling on your ligaments and work somewhat the way support does-- not all the reports on belly binding have been positive-- a long time ago women wore stays and after that they started wearing other support garments most women didn't know to help support the uterus upward- just tightly wrapping the belly in without doing something to deliberately support the uterus upward will actually worsen prolapse by pressure --- so a key part is to get that uterus lifted and trapped before wrapping ---
 

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I've got a belly band... how do you know if everything is "up" before you wrap? I wouldn't want to do myself more harm than good.<br><br>
Does cervical prolapse effect future pregnancies? Would I wind up on bedrest? In what ways might this effect my daily life?<br><br>
Is laying down usually recommended? I'm out gardening and chasing my toddler already (and have been since the day following by birth).<br><br>
I've just been told since I'm young and fit kegels should 'take care of it', but I feel like I need more answers and can't find them personally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
talked to my mw yesterday and she thinks that I should be fitted and wear a pessary for a month, until I am 6 weeks post partum and then reevealuate the degree of the prolapse. She diagnosed me as a 2 degree. She thinks that if it has some support, the ligaments will not be stretched and will regain their tone once the post partum period is over.<br><br>
Does anyone have any thoughts on this?
 
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