Mothering Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, this is my first post on this Mothering site. I have a daughter, Allison whos is 22 months old. I don't think I will homeschool her, but I did not see any other place to post my question, so maybe you can help me.<br><br>
She seems to be gifted......and we are not just proud parents saying so. I have had so many people, family, strangers, teachers, tell me how incredibly smart she is. She far exceeds speech and memory and cognition over any of her peers the same age.<br><br>
What should we be doing? We just want to continue to challenge her so she does not get bored. I am home with her and she does not go to daycare or preschool. She can play by herself sometimes, but other times, no matter how many toys I show her, she won't play. My husband thinks it may be that she is bored with them and needs to be challenged. She thrives on sitting with you and learning spanish, letters, etc.<br><br>
Looking for some tips or ideas and any guidance from others who have similar children.<br><br>
Shari
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,848 Posts
So read to her more. Give her books, a library card. Try puzzles, not just match the shape to the spot but actually put stuff together puzzles. Teach her how to play some games if she's ready for taking turns stuff or for cooperative. Memory might be a good one, for example. Get her stuff for 3-4 yos. Does she draw at all yet? Introduce her to artsy stuff like crayons and clay/playdough if you haven't already. Play counting games w/ her. If she's got counting down, move on and start teaching her to add, etc. Answer all her questions, find her some older children to play with, encourage her to use her imagination.<br><br>
Don't be afraid to go to the next level w/ her just because the age suggestions on the toy say minimum age is 3 or 5, etc. Follow where she leads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,562 Posts
When my dd was that age (she's also gifted) I did a lot of puzzles with her, reading, and asked her lots of questions to think about things. Like why do cars stop at the red light and go at the green light? We talked about emotions and tried to read the emotions of others. Why is that man sad?<br><br>
We did painting. I had her paint numbers and letters if she wanted to. Sidewalk chalk drawings and hopscotch, collages with found objects. I had her help me cook. I had her help me shop and asked her to put 3 red apples in the bag. I taught her how to check for bruised ones, etc. She started playing toddler computer games, too. Sesame Street Toddler was her favorite. We built castles out of blocks, and built boats out of duplos.<br><br>
Abi has always shown strong reading/verbal skills so after she learned her letters I started teaching her what sounds they made. I asked her to hunt letters on labels and signs ("can you find the big letter A?"). We also hunted for shapes and colors. It was her special job when I was driving to tell me to stop at a stop sign or red light, and to tell me to go with a green light (she still does that).<br><br>
Oh, and one of her favorite things was when I read a book that she was familiar with, I would change something about it and she thought that was so funny. It kept her at attention. Like "Once upon a time there were there little squirrels" and she would laugh and say, "No, it's bears." I did this at least once on every page. Then I would ask her to "read" the book back to me. I would read a book like Goodnight Moon or The Big Red Barn and ask her to point to the things in the picture that I was reading about. (Again I would also joke and say "Goodnight toothbrush" instead of goodnight brush and she found this very funny.)<br><br>
She helped me sort things and liked that a lot. I had her put the silverware away, stack big and small plates (we use Corelle so it doesn't break that easily). I had her sort our socks and undies when folding the clothes by who they belonged to.<br><br>
Have fun with your dd!<br><br>
Darshani
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,209 Posts
The nice thing about homeschooling is thatyour child is free to learn at her own speed, whether it's faster or slower than anyone else's speed (or faster in some areas and slower in others). Especially as an eclectic homeschooler or unschooler, it just doesn't matter, IME.<br><br>
Be with her, play with with, show her new things, answer her questions, give her time and space to challenge herself and learn and grow. Sitting surrounded by cool toys is not the way most toddlers learn. She needs to watch you and be with you while you do things...<br><br>
Rain started learning to play chess right around her second birthday - I was a college student and we hung out in cafes a lot, and there were always chess sets around and I likd to play. She watched some games, asked some questions, tried it out a few times, got bored and played with the pieces, tried it out a few more times, played some more... but by 2 1/2 or so she could play chess. Not very well, mind you - she didn't beat me for a few more years - but she could play the game.<br><br>
We also joined our local science museum when she was 2 or 3. Joining meant going was not a big thing - we could stay for an hour or 6, and she could do the "spinny thing" for an hour or so, or the marble thing, or whatever. We'd bring lunch and hang out, I might bring a magazine or newspaper or something... if she was absorbed I'd give her space; if she seemed antsy I might demonstrate or point out something cool.<br><br>
Traditional academic things generally come pretty easily if you respect your child's timetable. When Rain was 2ish we played some rhyming games, silly ones but fun. She started drawing people right around her second birthday, and also making letters with blocks. Later we did Treasure Hunts, where I would hide a series of cards with one word clues that she could read, leading to a "prize" (usually a lego treasure chest). It just sort of all evolved holistically, though... just being there was the important part.<br><br>
Dar
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,773 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>allismom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br>
Looking for some tips or ideas and any guidance from others who have similar children.<br></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
2 of my kids are gifted, so I know exactly where you're coming from. Definitely read to her, but one of my gifted kids hated being read to. I think it was too slow for him. He never did well with the "sit down and listen to me" kind of instruction.<br><br>
The best thing for my 2 gifted kids was the computer. Very precocious kids tend to enjoy learning on their own at their own (fast) pace, both of which the computer allows. Both my gifted kids started using the computer around age 2 and taught themselves to read. This was all of their own very determined volition-- no prodding from me. You might have to start with having her point on the computer screen while you manipulate the mouse, but she'll probably be able to do it on her own pretty soon.<br><br>
All of the "Reader Rabbit" programs are good, and a few of the toddler "Jumpstart" programs are as well. Look for solid, educational software that doesn't have a lot of bells and whistles.<br><br>
I'm not saying that you should park her in front of the computer all day, but if it appeals to her, don't withhold it from her because "screens are bad."<br><br>
"Teach Your child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons" is a good book to use, if she'll tolerate instruction, but never force that sort of thing this early on.<br><br>
Other than that, keep the TV to a minumum, and have a lot of books around the house. Math charts on the wall would probably fascinate her too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,514 Posts
I agree that the computer is a good tool. That was a lifesaver for me when Hollis was that age. He loved the Reader Rabbit and Jumpstart games. Also, there is a company called Ohio Distinctive Software that made cheap, really cool, simple learning games with unending levels. I don't know if they're around anymore but you might want to do a search.<br><br>
Other things he liked when he was little:<br><br>
* The Magnadoodle. He carried it EVERYWHERE. He was constantly practicing letters and numbers, math and reading on it. I swear if we didn't have one we would have been buried in a mountain of paper.<br><br>
* Workbooks. He loved math and phonics workbooks at that age.<br><br>
* Making patterns and doing math with Duplos. He used to get the biggest kick out of that when he was a toddler.<br><br>
* Letter, number, and map puzzles.<br><br>
* Gameshows. He used to watch the Game Show Network all the time. And the Weather Channel. He didn't really watch much kids' TV but he loved those two channels and learned a ton from them. I'm talking regular quiz shows, not "reality" shows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,514 Posts
Okay, I thought of a couple more:<br><br>
* a number board with the numbers in squares from 1-100 and tiles to put on the squares. We got ours from a Montessori catalog.<br><br>
* Plastic letters and numbers to make words and do math.<br><br>
* V-tech learning toys. As a general rule, I don't buy electronic toys, but he had a couple of these that were great for trips by car or plane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,240 Posts
When my ds was that age he was really into maps and geography, sciency stuff (he was obsessed with the concept of gravity), arts and crafts, and just absorbing as much as he could about everything!! He was long bored with letters, numbers, shapes, etc. Since he was into maps and such we bought him lots of map puzzles. He learned all the provinces and who we knew in each one. It was also his "job" to give directions when we were driving. My dh broke his foot a few months prior, so we spent a lot of time in the car. He had a great sense of direction and I could give him a list of places that we needed to go. When we got back into the car I would ask him, "where to now?" and he would point us to the next destination. I also had him remember shopping lists and he would lead me around the grocery store from item to item.<br><br>
We also spent a lot of time just learning about whatever we saw in our daily travels. We learned about all the different animals, the jobs of each big machine we saw at constructions sites, facts about bushes, flowers, trees, and insects, how different things worked, you get the idea.<br><br>
The computer was great too. He loved Blue's Clues games (still does :LOL). He was especially fond of the Treasure Hunt or Blue's Birthday where you have to find one item before you can move on (adventure type games). They have lots of educational content like math, reading, memory, science facts like planets, nature facts, directions, etc.<br><br>
I say just follow your dd's lead. Whatever she is interested in just follow her lead. If she likes reading, then read. If she likes puzzles, get a ton of puzzles. I always love to keep art supplies around as well, even my 15 month old loves to color, glue, and paint and both boys could spend hours on various art projects. When all else fails get outside. The opportunites for fun and learning are endless in a backyard, park, or neighborhood stroll.<br><br>
Good luck, it can be challenging to stay ahead of a gifted child <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Look for her cues about what she does like. She might like going to museums, or reading, or looking closely at natural objects like leaves, or listening to different kinds of music, or learning how to pound out simple songs on the piano.<br><br>
Our son read independently by the time he was 2. He is newly 5 now and can read on an adult level. We believe in child-led learning, and in providing a rich learning environment for him. In our family, this means constant access to quality books, regular trips to the library and local museums, impromptu science experiments, and lots and lots of answered questions. I feel that I am getting a second education by homeschooling him, and it's probably a much better education that I received in school.<br><br>
Slightly off topic, but realizing that our child was gifted was what ultimately led us to keep our child out of school. We searched and searched and couldn't find an educational option that would work for him.<br><br>
I wish you much enjoyment on your journey with your daughter. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Tara
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all of your wonderful ideas and tips on how to keep Allison challenged. Many of the things you suggested, we are doing, but you have given me new ways to do them or suggest I do them more often, expand upon them etc.<br><br>
I was very reluctant to introduce computer games......for fear she'll sit here too long (like me!), as I am with TV. But I see how incredibly much Elmo and Dora have taught her and I have to just admit that technology can be a teaching aid!<br><br>
I see that Vtech has a tv game called Vsmile out......like a Nintendo but for young children and it appears educational. I am going to check that out too.<br><br>
Thank you for all the suggestions!<br><br>
Shari
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,796 Posts
hi Shari -<br><br>
More ideas for you -<br><br>
My DD is nearly 3 now and is also quite gifted. I agree with the computer - she LOVES the computer - and here are some awesome sites for you:<br><br><a href="http://www.starfall.com/" target="_blank">http://www.starfall.com/</a><br><a href="http://www.atozteacherstuff.com/" target="_blank">http://www.atozteacherstuff.com/</a><br><a href="http://www.dltk-teach.com/alphabuddies/index.htm" target="_blank">http://www.dltk-teach.com/alphabuddies/index.htm</a><br><a href="http://www.headsprout.com/samples/" target="_blank">http://www.headsprout.com/samples/</a> (not free)<br><a href="http://www.kinderart.com/" target="_blank">http://www.kinderart.com/</a> (My FAVE site)<br><br>
The things that are so overlooked as being important ARE the most important - they are music and art. My DD and I have a music time everyday - we have a large variety of musical instruments and she wants to play guitar SO bad - when she is 3 I am signing her up for Suzuki Guitar. Art. We do art every single day and it is proudly displayed on the walls of her room. She is very very creative.<br><br>
she has also taught herself how to read. I didn't even know she could until I turned on the TV to PBS to see something and they had a channel line up and she read it to me! She said "Sesame Street and Barney are coming on" and it wasn't the logo's - it was the words. She now points out words to me all the time - that says ______.<br><br>
Don't pressure her. Have fun and remember kids leanr best through play, whatever that means to them.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top