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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey wonderful Mothering mates!<br><br>
I've enjoyed this forum for years, first as wonderactivist and now as Madame Pomfrey. What I like most about it is the way it provides a place for school families, Waldorf educators, and homeschoolers to all talk together about common goals, problems, and those little victories we all understand! (Sometimes in Waldorf our "victories" can be things like a candle-dipping session where nobody got a burn; or just the right paint mix for a watercolor session; or a circle time that really touched the kids, etc! They seem small to other people.)<br><br>
I've always thought that Waldorfers from each place had something to learn from the others and that we would all benefit from more talk across the walls of school/home/and homeschool.<br><br>
Now years later, I'm wonderig if you've noticed any change? Do you see schools reaching out to homeschoolers or taking in some of their ideas? Do you see homeschoolers learning more and more from Waldorf teachers - even at times taking the training themselves? Do you see Waldorf school families sharing festival ideas with homeschoolers or vice versa?<br><br>
Do you think the interchange could improve Waldorf ed in the 21st century?<br><br>
Lucie
 

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I haven't personally seen this on a local level but I think dialogue between waldorf schools and homeschoolers is very important. I know that we have flip flopped between school and homeschooling ourselves and I would love to see a better bridge between the two in our local community.
 

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Our school started out as a Waldorf homeschool support network, a place where families could go to share ideas, learn handwork, and create community, and grew into a real Waldorf school after a couple of years. We still have a homeschool contingent that meets at school on Fridays for a special class, a community handwork class, and two playgroups where the entire family is welcome to attend. Our school director is the moderator of a large Waldorf homeschool Yahoo group, and our school also hosts a Waldorf homeschool conference every year.<br><br>
Mostly I see information flowing from Waldorf to the homeschoolers (how to set up rhythms, celebrate the seasons, make a nature table, specific lesson plans, etc). I have not seen much in the way of homeschooling influencing Waldorf education, though I think that this could be a good thing, (i.e fresher, more multicultural, matierials and lessons for instance)
 

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I was reading the Research Bulletin (Spring 2006) from the Research Institute for Waldorf Education and found this in the Report on the On-Line Waldorf Library:
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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Homeschooling curriculum questions continue to arrive, and OWL serves the needs of many families, many of whom regularly correspond with me via email.</td>
</tr></table></div>
[I'm going to have a couple of these bulletins available eventually. If anyone is interested send me a PM.]<br><br>
I know the Rudolf Steiner Library in Ghent, NY also serves the homeschool community with waldorf resources.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks so much for your thoughts everyone!<br><br>
I know that homeschooling has a completely different mindset on education and it is hard for teachers & school administrators to understand that - I find that even in the museum where I work in science ed.<br><br>
I think that, best of all, the more the different groups help each other the more children will benefit from Waldorf - like you said, a "fresh," 21st century Waldorf.<br><br>
Warm regards,<br><br>
Lucie
 
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