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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saved the fat from my soup last week, and it's sitting in a glass container on top of some soup it separated from, in the fridge.<br><br>
Is this okay? Should I skim it off the soup? Is it useless now that it's been sitting a week or so on the other liquid?<br><br>
If it had been stored properly, how long can I use it?<br><br><br>
Also, does scraping the solid fat off chilled stock translate into "rendered fat" or should I still cook this fat down?<br><br><br>
Thanks! This is new for me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
~alicia
 

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It is safe to eat so long as the fat has formed a seal at the top of the soup preventing air from getting to the soup. Once you break that seal though, you need to use it pretty quickly (couple of days).<br><br>
This is fat that has been rendered from the animal. But it is not what is usually meant when we discuss rendered fat around here. What we mean by that is fat that has been completely separated from all the other impurities (water, solids, etc.). So that you don't have that separation, you just have pure fat. It's not about cooking it down, it's about removing the impurities, which are what encourage it to go bad.<br><br>
To do this, I would take something like a jar of bacon drippings (or a slab of pig fat), and put it into a large heavy pan (not cast iron or non-stick). Let it melt and as it melts all the impurities will settle to the bottom of the pan. For something like bacon grease this doesn't take long, maybe 20 minutes. For pig fat, it would take several hours. Then I use a turkey baster and/or a ladle to pull the fat off the top into a clean jar. Once it's in the jar, there should be no separation going on, the fat should look clean and white/pale yellow. Pop a canning lid on it while it's hot, let it come down to room temp and stick it in the pantry (or the fridge if you're only doing a small amount). With bacon you should be left with a small amount of fat in the bottom of the pan, and all the bits and pieces of bacon and grit. With pig fat you would be left with cracklins (fried pig skin), which are yummy.<br><br>
HTH
 

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Yes, the fat you peel off on the top of stock is considered render fat. If using soon, I just scrape off and use as is. Otherwise, I reheat all of the peeled off fat to remove any particulates that may be in the fat and also a bit of broth often is stuck on the fat when I remove it. The fat can be stored for a few months in the fridge if it is pure fat but any food or bits of broth in it will cause it to spoil. When you heat it on low heat for awhile, it will sizzle and spatter and the bits of food/broth in it turn brown and then I run it through a fine strainer and save the fat in a glass container.<br><br>
If you want your broth to last longer in the fridge, you can leave the layer of fat at the top. The fat helps preserve the broth.<br><br>
Chicken fat is also known as schmaltz and used traditionally in cooking for anything from cooking liver to cooking vegetables. I use it mainly for my vegetables.<br><br>
The fat storing on top of your broth should still be fine, but since you peeled the fat off, you should be using your broth soon since it's already been storing for a week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you!
 

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I don't know how useful this would be, but I have a Little House on the Prairie recipe book (which is awesome, btw), and in it she gives instructions for purifying fat to store. She basically says to put the fat in a pot of water, let it come to a simmer, then let everything cool down until the fat congeals at the top. This way, all the solids are in the water/bottom of the pot, and you can skim the clean fat off without worry.<br><br>
hth!<br><br>
Ami
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>JTA Mom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12395257"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I don't know how useful this would be, but I have a Little House on the Prairie recipe book (which is awesome, btw), and in it she gives instructions for purifying fat to store. She basically says to put the fat in a pot of water, let it come to a simmer, then let everything cool down until the fat congeals at the top. This way, all the solids are in the water/bottom of the pot, and you can skim the clean fat off without worry.<br><br>
hth!<br><br>
Ami</div>
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I tried this today with some pork fat from a boston butt roast I made on Sunday. Not too impressed....I got some fat, but it wasn't that pure white, it still had some brown fleks in it after quite a while on the stove, simmering. I don't think it will keep well so plan on using what I have this week. It did help make a nice pie crust for our chicken pot pie tonight, though!
 
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