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I am confused. I thought I read that because of the chicken pox vaccine more people will get shingles later on in life.<br><br>
But I just read on the CDC website:<br><br>
Each year, an estimated one million Americans are afflicted with herpes zoster, a painful viral infection commonly called shingles, which is caused by the chicken pox virus. Shingles can develop in anyone who has had chicken pox.<br><br>
So which is right? You can get shingles if you had the chicken pox or you are more likely to get it if you had the vaccine and didn't contract chicken pox naturally?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CanidFL</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9762897"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">So which is right? You can get shingles if you had the chicken pox or you are more likely to get it if you had the vaccine and didn't contract chicken pox naturally?</div>
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Both. The vaccine is live. You can only get shingles IF you got chickenpox OR were vaccinated for it.<br><br>
It's too early to tell for sure, but there is research that is showing that those vaccinated for CP instead of getting natural immunity seem to be more susceptible to shingles.<br><br>
-Angela
 

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I think the evidence to suggest that those who are vaccinated are more likely to develop shingles than those who catch wild chickenpox is actually pretty compelling. JMO
 

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what they said.<br><br>
also check out dermatlas for a pic of a child who developed shingles after he had received his varicella vaccination.
 

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I bet the vaccine was SUPPOSED to make shingles less likely. And I can see why this was thought possible.<br><br>
Chickenpox results in the virus hiding out in the body. Shingles can emerge for various reasons, usually in the elderly. So the assumption was that the attenuated virus given in the shot would not hang out in the body in the same way and would not, therefore, emerge later as shingles.<br><br>
Unfortunately it seems, in many children to emerge sooner as shingles. Instead of being an illness of old age it is becoming an illness of childhood!<br><br>
And the decreased rate of chickenpox, due to vaxing, is resulting in a higher rate of shingles in the middle-aged and elderly. Apparently circulating CP reduces the rate of shingles by boosting immune resistance and helping people keep the virus in hiding.<br><br>
Very unfortunate all around, except for the smart people who sell Varivax for CP (now needed for lifelong boosters) and Zostavax (for shingles) now needed from middle age on.<br><br>
Are Zostavax boosters recommended yet?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Deborah</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9765791"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">And the decreased rate of chickenpox, due to vaxing, is resulting in a higher rate of shingles in the middle-aged and elderly. Apparently circulating CP reduces the rate of shingles by boosting immune resistance and helping people keep the virus in hiding.</div>
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That is the explanation I was looking for! Thanks. I knew I read that somewhere. It really is unfortunate that this is happening. All so parents don't miss work!
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CanidFL</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9762897"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am confused. I thought I read that because of the chicken pox vaccine more people will get shingles later on in life.<br><br>
But I just read on the CDC website:<br><br>
Each year, an estimated one million Americans are afflicted with herpes zoster, a painful viral infection commonly called shingles, which is caused by the chicken pox virus. Shingles can develop in anyone who has had chicken pox.<br><br>
So which is right? You can get shingles if you had the chicken pox or you are more likely to get it if you had the vaccine and didn't contract chicken pox naturally?</div>
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My sister got Shingles when she was 4! It looked really painful...I was only 10 but in my fuzzy memory, i remember her standing on the table at the Ped office while a few nurses scraped off her scabs while she stood their screaming. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Very unfortunate all around, except for the smart people who sell Varivax for CP (<i><b>now needed for lifelong boosters</b></i>)</td>
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<br>
This is the issue that really sickens me....I think this will only really become apparent when we start having college outbreaks of chicken pox. We are still a few years away from that.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Plummeting</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9763360"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think the evidence to suggest that those who are vaccinated are more likely to develop shingles than those who catch wild chickenpox is actually pretty compelling. JMO</div>
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Where can I find more infor about this? This is the first I've heard of it.
 

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I've read that being periodically exposed to children with chicken pox supresses the virus that also causes shingles. Because fewer children are now getting chicken pox, more adults (and kids) are expected to be coming down with shingles.<br><br>
This is a bummer because many more older adults die from shingles than children die from chicken pox. I guess they didn't think this one thru too well, did they?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>13Sandals</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9775076"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">This is the issue that really sickens me....I think this will only really become apparent when we start having college outbreaks of chicken pox. We are still a few years away from that.</div>
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not really - we had a small outbreak at my college last year, <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sandygirl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9775423"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">not really - we had a small outbreak at my college last year, <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:</div>
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Vaccine was licensed on Mar 17, 1995 and it probably took a couple of years before there was widespread vaccination. So the first kids who got this vaccine would be 13 years old? Not college age yet.<br><br>
I wonder if CP is one of those diseases where having had it naturally doesn't maintain immunity if there is no exposure to circulating virus? I have heard of people getting it twice.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>alllyssa</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9775354"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">This is a bummer because many more older adults die from shingles than children die from chicken pox.</div>
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more adults die from chicken pox itself, as well. I think we are going to start seeing outbreaks in the adult community - from waning protection of the vaccine and also, like Deborah said, less chance for natural boosters because cp isn't circulating anymore.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I guess they didn't think this one thru too well, did they?</td>
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ohhhhh - didn't they though?<br><br>
ETA: the year the cp vax came out - the ads sad "100 people die each year due to cp" the small print said - 80 of those deaths were in people 18 years or older...
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Deborah</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9775608"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Vaccine was licensed on Mar 17, 1995 and it probably took a couple of years before there was widespread vaccination. So the first kids who got this vaccine would be 13 years old? Not college age yet.<br><br>
I wonder if CP is one of those diseases where having had it naturally doesn't maintain immunity if there is no exposure to circulating virus? I have heard of people getting it twice.</div>
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hmm - we also have a high school attached to the college, so maybe thats why.<br><br>
I seem to remember being pressured to get this in the early 90's - 1991 maybe? I had already had CP 3 times, and pedi wanted me to get the vax "because my immunity might not be strong enough"<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>alllyssa;</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I've read that being periodically exposed to children with chicken pox supresses the virus that also causes shingles. Because fewer children are now getting chicken pox, more adults (and kids) are expected to be coming down with shingles.<br><br>
This is a bummer because many more older adults die from shingles than children die from chicken pox. I guess they didn't think this one thru too well, did they?</div>
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This is precisely the issue. Chickenpox used to be so ubiquitous in our environment that we were always boosting natural immunity. But now that it is no longer around us, the virus has a much better chance to flare up and cause shingles in adults. We are essentially turning a benign childhood illness (for most kids) into a serious teenager and adult problem. They are "fixing" this problem by offering a shingles vaccination, which is basically chickenpox X a billion in a shot to try and imitate our natural constant exposure.<br><br>
According to Dr. Jay Gordan, the chickenpox vaccine actually existed before they started routinely giving it to kids - it existed for those who really NEEDED it, such as a child with a severely compromised immune system from cancer medication. The manufacturers would go every year before the board to get it approved but they never got approval. This went on until the manufacturer stopped making the vaccine for a while (to make an unethical, invalid point) and an immunosuppressed child who couldn't get the vaccine died from CP. They then used this as evidence to put it on the routine schedule (and make tons of money and shift the disease into other age groups where it is much more likely to be a problem - but who cares, right? they can make even more money with a shingles vaccine!)
 
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