Mothering Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
871 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am interested in an engaging children's poetry book that both explains poetry and has examples of different types. I thought I saw something like this on a blog...I believe it also had a CD with it? (How's that for vague description!) My son is saying he hates poetry and I am wanting something that might change his mind!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,896 Posts
my best tip for getting children to enjoy poetry is kinda in the opposite direction of what you are looking. skip the explinations and skip "good" poetry but just start reading. I read 3-5 poems per day by 2-3 different writers. they are free to hate them. and they are free to tell me about it. or if they can't figure uot why they like it that is thier business too. and they are free to like the ones I hate and need no god reason for liking it. we don't discuss types of poetry, or what makes it a poem or who go into details about the life of the athour (although we are reading Milne now which intregues them).

we only spend about 5 mihnutes a day doing it. do you think your son would indulge you for 5 minutes a day? perhaps even if you read just one while he was brusing his teeth each night.

There is so much great poetry for child, both classic and modern (I would suggest a mix of both), that enough exposure is bound to turn up something he likes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
There is no kid that I know of who would be turned off by Shel Silverstein's Runny Babbit. It is bright, funny and whimsical. Good poetry for a poetry-hating kid:

KUGS AND HISSES

Runny said, "I'm lonesome,
I feel so glad and soomy.
I need some kugs and hisses--
Now who's gonna give 'em to me?"
"I will," said Polly Dorkupine,
"'Cause you'er cute as a rug in a bug."
Said Runny, "Well, I'll kake the tiss,
But never hind the mug."

Also, any of the books by Douglas Florian whose illustrations and layout of the words match the poem. So a poem about poodles has the words in four lines as arcs making curls like the poodle. Bow Wow Meow Meow is a good one and so is Omnibeasts.

HTH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,914 Posts
There are 2 books I know that might fit your description (that have cd's)
A child's introduction to poetry
and
poetry speaks to children
(this is my favourite of the 2)

There is also A Kick in the Head but it doesn't have a cd

there are a couple of books/poets you might try
Shel Silverstein
Jack Prelusky
Edward Lear
Dennis Lee (all of these are silly/funny)

You didn't say how old you son is but I'll offer a few suggestions for poetry books my kids enjoy
Talking like the Rain (recently on book closeouts very inexpensively and has lovely illustrations)
Caroline Kennedy's collection of family poetry - can't remember exact title
Poems Old and New (not illustrated but has nice selections. It's a standard in my house.

You might try story poems (creation of Sam McGee, Custard the Dragon, Casey at Bat) or get a book of poetry on a topic he is interested in - there are lots out there on everything from geography to pirates to space which is likely to have some in different styles. We read a poem or two to our kids after bedtime stories - and I think it has helped them love poetry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
871 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sure, I think ds would listen for about 5 minutes. He is a very analytical kid so poetry has been frustrating for him-- so that is why I was thinking if there was a resource that described for example haiku is seven syllables in the first line, that would help him deconstruct the poem and look for patterns (something he does love to do).

Thanks in advance!

ETA-ds is 7yo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
I have a very analytical son, at age six he's decided he's an atheist...even though no one else around him is. His reason? Gods aren't logical when looked at from a scientific point of view.
:

I work really hard to get him into creative, artistic and emotional pursuits to try to balance his natural cold logic.

I've tried so many times to get him into poetry, and failed over and over.
We just got Poerty Speaks to Children, and let me just say WOW! We listen to the CD constantly! DS put the CD on repeat and will listen to it ALL DAY. I think it helps that several of the poets discribe their writting process before reading the poem. He's also listening to the CD and going over the book at the same time which is improving his reading...I just can't say enough about the book and CD we love them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I second the suggestions for Caroline Kennedy's A Family of Poems. It is a beautiful book to read, and just to look at. My kids have also really enjoyed Douglas Florian's and Jack Prelutsky's poetry.

Although it doesn't come with a cd, the picture book I just picked up at the library seems to fit the bill for the OP -- R is for Rhyme: A Poetry Alphabet by Judy Young (sorry I haven't figured out the Amazon-link thing yet). For example, B is for ballad, H is for haiku, L is for limerick, and M is for metaphor, etc. Each term is explained, and expanded upon somewhat, and is accompanied by a poem.

--LL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,898 Posts
We have a collection called "Knock at a Star: a Child's Introduction to Poetry" by X. J. and Dorothy M. Kennedy. It has an unusually nice (logical) way of organizing the poems. (it is VERY cheap used on Amazon!) In the chapter "What Do Poems Do?" are sections called "make you laugh" "tell stories" "send messages" "share feelings" and "start you wondering"...Then in "What's Inside a Poem?" are "images" "word music" "beats that repeat"... Then there are a "Special Kinds of Poems" which includes limericks and haiku and others, and then a "Do It Yourself" chapter at the end. Each section includes short, appealing choices, many op which are real treasures. I have about twelve different poetry anthologies for children, all very good, and this is the best for children just at the edge of an interest in poetry.

If your son is older and you are interested in how to put poems together, we have liked doing the clearly-explained writing in the "Poetry Writing Handbook" (gr. 4-6). I have a child who has largely learned to read fluently through writing, first, and I would speculate that some children would do well to use writing poetry as a way to awaken interest in reading it.

I don't think you should work too hard to get your son interested if he simply isn't, though. He may get more out of word games or madlibs or something else before he is ready for poetry.

knock at a star

poetry writing handbook

Oh I'll throw this one in too. It's really nice for helping kids write freely in ways that express themselves, but it is for parents or teachers to read. The poetry in the book is all written by young children: wishes lies and dreams
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top