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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if any here gives "chores" to the SN kids and if so, what kinds of things do you have them do.<br><br>
My DD is almost 5 and I feel like she could start doing some things to help around the house - but she has poor fine motor skills and motor coordination skills so asking her to do something like fold laundry is too hard for her to figure out yet (or I can't figure out how to show her in a way that makes sense to her). She can do things like squirt bottles though. But she can't figure out how to sweep. I guess she's kind of scatter shot on her life skills still (she still has trouble getting dressed, for example).<br><br>
Any suggestions of what might be good to start her with? What do other folks do with their SN kids?<br><br>
tia<br>
peace,<br>
robyn
 

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I dont specialize chores based on SN but rather on age and ability. All my kids have regular chores. My DS is not good at folding, sweeping or dishes... he's usually assigned to sorting laundry, hauling landry to the laundry room or something similar. Large muscle chores are great options for him.
 

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All my kids have chores...but we go with their stregths and abilities too. Ds is in charge of picking up the bedroom toys. He ensures that they are all perfectly lined up on the shelf<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> It was important to us that he have a "job" to do just like his siblings. If nothing else, I would never hear the end of it from my 6 year old..."No fair!"
 

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Dd is 7 and she does have chores. She wipes the table after dinner, puts dirty clothes in the laundry basket, and helps to clean her room. She also helps put away groceries after shopping. We try to find age-appropriate chores that also allow for the fact that she has visual and motor skills challenges.<br><br>
It doesn't stop the "no fair" from the sibs, but I figure that's pretty much a lost cause anyways <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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I've always given out chores based on the child's individual abilities. From infancy I had them putting their own toys away (which at first meant me doing it with them and it taking longer than just diong it myself)- my attitude is "if you're big enough to take a toy out, you're big enough to put it back."<br><br>
As preschoolers my kids were helping to set the table. I have fairly non-breakable dishes and my kitchen is set up so the dairy dishes are easy for the kids to reach, so having a 4yo put out dishes was realistic and safe. If your kitchen is set up differently, you could still have your child put out napkins and silverware.<br><br>
As for laundry, I have DS put away his laundry but I fold it for him and he just transfers the folded laundry from his bed to the drawers. If your child can't do that yet, then assign different chores.
 

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Of course!<br><br>
When I babysit or am doing a home program with a student, I always incorporate age and skill-appropriate chores into the day, depending on any specific requests from the parents.<br><br>
Remember that children can always do sections of a specific chore even if they need help or can't do the whole thing.<br><br>
I had one student with autism. He is mostly nonverbal and needs a lot of demonstration but understands a lot of receptive language. At age 8, we included these chores during the week:<br><br>
-making the bed (picking up his pillow if it was on the floor and putting it back at the head of the bed, and pulling the blanket back up.)<br><br>
-cleaning up his room (helping him to become independent in looking around and finding what toys, books, etc. were out of place and putting them away, bringing any dirty laundry to the hamper in the bathroom)<br><br>
-tidying up the livingroom (having him get any cups he brought there to drink from and returning them to the sink, and returning any of his toys to his room. I wanted that to be really independent so I would not go with him to make sure they went into the right place in his room. I was satisfied as long as he put them in his room and then returned.)<br><br>
-helping with the dishes (putting his dishes into the sink after each meal or snack; and helping me sort the clean silverware into the drawer from the dishwasher)<br><br>
-learning to use a broom to sweep up the dining room including learning where the broom is kept in the garage, going to get it, helping to sweep, and then returning the broom<br><br>
-bringing in the rolling recycling and garbage cans from the street after school on garbage pickup days.<br><br>
The main focus in most of this, besides having him be part of the family's daily cleaning, was having him learn jobs that he could do independently. Other people might be part of the job, but his portion of it done without help was the target. This allowed him to be more self confident about going to different locations and getting items and returning, doing the activity, knowing when it was done without waiting for an adult to tell him, and then returning his tools or items. He was so used to doing such things with adults that he was very dependent on them to let him know when he had finished or done a good job, and I wanted him to judge that for himself, and decide when to put things away. I chose simple activities that had very clear items and locations, and made sure to maintain the tools and organization so that he always found the broom when he went to the sink in the garage. This way, he could become successful at the task before having to perform problem-solving while doing it.
 

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oh, my son LOVES to push buttons <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> So we started out by letting him push "Start" on the microwave, dishwasher, and clothes washer/dryer. Then we taught him how to help load small plastic dishes in the dishwasher before he could turn it on. Same with clothes. He also likes to sweep and turn the dust buster on, so we help him use it, too.
 

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DS is 5 with ADHD and anxiety.<br><br>
Since he was about 3, he's cleared his own place when he is finished with a meal. (This started because he would tell me he was finished, I'd throw the food away, he'd pitch a fit; so I started having him do it to avoid the fit.) He now also takes everyone's napkins and puts them in the hamper.<br><br>
He has to help with cleaning up toys and I've tried to encourage him to do more if it himself. So now I usually ask him to start while I do something else, then I help for a bit and then I ask him to finish while I pull down blinds (we do this before bedtime), etc.<br><br>
He is responsible for picking and getting out his own clothing. (I only have weather appropriate stuff available and I don't care it he clashes.) He is also responsible for putting his dirty clothes in the hamper.<br><br>
I am working on getting him to remember to bring his dirty cups back to the kitchen to be washed.<br><br>
At this point, all other chores are at his discretion and he earns points towards books or toys if he chooses to help out more than the above.<br><br>
I have been thinking of adding to his list. If I do, it will most likely be for him to make his own bed.<br><br>
Catherine
 

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My 5 year old DD has motor delays and a bunch of other "issues" but she's able to help out at home quite a bit.<br><br>
She gathers laundry and throws it down the stairs to the laundry room. She also helps set the table (it's not pretty but it is functional). She can help clean up her room or the play room if you help her by breaking it down into individual tasks. She helps carry groceries in from the car. She puts her socks and underwear away and can help fold washcloths and hand towels (again not pretty but it works for us). She can even make her bed somewhat well (sometimes really well!). Sometimes she helps vacuum or sweep the floor.<br><br>
Good luck implementing some chores!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
these are all great! thanks for the examples...I've been letting DD help here and there but not making it a "routine" for her but I think some of these things are great ideas for stuff she could do regularly....<br><br>
so far the only regular things she does is harvest the fruit from the garden (most of which goes right into her mouth!) LOL<br><br>
peace,<br>
robyn
 

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DS has Dyspraxia so we don't let him handle dishes or do any chore that requires fine motor (folding clothes) because he simply can't do some of it and I'd rather it be a positive experience than one that hurts his confidence. He also has bone issues so weight-bearing chores are great. So, he cleans up the playroom (putting all toys into bins, there are tons), hauls dirty laundry to the laundry room (2 floors down) and then takes the clean upstairs. He likes to set the table (I put the breakables on the table, he sorts it all out). He also feeds the dog, waters the dog, makes dinner with me and helps outside (sweeping the patio, working in the garden, pulling weeds).<br><br><b>Mamatohaleybug</b> - Wow, our kids do nearly all of the same things! I forgot about the groceries. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 
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