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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok. I am sure some of you all have been through this before....<br>
DD is 16 months. She will not leave the tree alone. I have told her no. I have told her it is pretty and just to look at. She continues to pull the ornaments off.<br><br>
I can't block it off or put it in a playpen, because it is huge. I also thought about taking off the bottom ornaments, but she can reach about half way up the tree so it would look really stupid. Also I want her to learn to just look at it and not pull the ornaments off.<br><br>
We have just a few other things that she isn't allowed to bother in the living room area, such as the lamps, and a few things on the table. She does well with those. So I know she is capable of learning to leave it alone. But I need some suggestions on how to accomplish this???<br><br>
The only thing I can think of is to just keep her so busy that she doesn't have time to worry about the tree.
 

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Do you have, or could you borrow, one of those huge octagonal baby gates (I think they are called play yards)<br>
That's what we've always used...<br>
Annette
 

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I don't have any advice. I tried to convince DB to not even put ornaments on it b/c she wants to take them down..and it's not worth the power struggle...so I usually let her take one off and it makes her happy!
 

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That was my other suggestion- have a little fake tree with non-breakable ornaments she can decorate and undecorate and redecorate<br>
Annette
 

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Because of this, we are not putting up a tree until the 20th, and taking it down on the 26th!<br><br>
We have lights in the window and DS spends a lot of time, unplugging them and plugging them back in. He also likes to touch all the little lights he can reach, with one finger. wooo fun for hours!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just decided to take the bottom ornaments off. She is so little, she doesn't understand why she can't have the "pre-pre" (pretty pretty). The tree looks kind of stupid, but thats not whats important right? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/thanks.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thanks">
 

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Well, we skipped the tree his first Christmas. He was not quite a year and it just seemed like way too much! The second year he was 23 months and VERY interested and into everything of course. We spent a lot of time initially exploring the tree together, and I let him handle many of the ornaments with my supervision. After sometime, he'd get his fill and move on and once the tree was in the house a few days, the excitment wore off, etc. I think I did make sure to put more precious ornaments up top and the more durable ones on the bottom.<br><br>
Sounds like you've already come to a workable solution though and no, don't worry about how the tree looks! These are the things that parenting stories are made of: "Oh, I remember that first Christmas you were up walking around! I had to put up all the ornaments, you wouldn't leave the tree alone, you LOVED it, etc...." <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
The best,<br>
Em
 

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Half of our ornaments are toys or cloth or metal (not sharp), and we put those at the bottom of the tree. My son never messed with it, but this is our first Christmas with our daughter mobile, and I have a feeling that she will be different........... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> She's a wily one.<br><br>
I have friends who got a little tree and put it on a table, and put a gate around the table.<br><br>
L.
 

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Funny enough, just today I reread a post I wrote here ages ago on this very topic. Here is what we did:<br><br>
"For us, replacing the words "don't touch" with "one finger touching" has made a huge difference. I noticed last year sometime, that if I used my brain and tried to think of what Bella could do - as opposed to what she couldn't do - that we had much more success. For instance, saying "feet on the floor" gets quick results, while "do not climb on the table" gets none.<br>
This little trick first became useful last Christmas, when Bella was entranced with the Christmas tree ornaments and was pulling things off the tree.<br>
For days we were frustrated because no matter how many times we said no or redirected her, she just went right back and pulled off another ornament. Then we decided to show her how to touch with one finger. Every time she went for the tree we repeated "one finger" over and over, while showing her how to touch with her index finger only. Much to our amazement - within a few tries - she not only got it, but she was overjoyed to be able to explore the tree the way she wanted to from the beginning.<br>
This works so well in stores. Before we enter I store I always remind her that here she can only touch with one finger, and tell her that if she grabs things she will have to come up in my arms or sit in her stroller or cart. It is amazing how well she understands, and when she gets excited just a simple reminder of "one finger" usually does it.<br>
This also helps so much with breakable or decorative things that just beg for tactile exploration. "One finger gives her the freedom to touch as much as she wants, and relieves my worry that things will get broken! Most of all, I enjoy the fact that I don't have to run around screaming "Don't touch, don't touch" over and over again like a broken record!"
 
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