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DD and I are finishing up the lion, the witch, and the wardrobe. She wants to read more of the series, but asked that we read something else first, and then go back. We are looking for more classic novels, she loves the lion, witch, wardrobe style stories. But I bet she would like other styles as well if we read them, so we would be interested in different genres as well.

So what are your favorite and best classic novels that a 5 year old could enjoy?
 

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My 5 year old also loved The Lion. We read The Magician's Nephew which is the first in the series chronologically but she didn't get into it as much. He loved the first Harry Potter book (yah I know its not for everyone and technically not a classic yet) but the second one was beyond her ability to read between the lines. Might also want to read My Fathers Dragon, Stuart Little, and Charlottes Web.
 

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The Prydian series by Lloyd Alexander is a little dark, but keep it in mind for when she is a bit older. A great book by the same author is the Cat who Wished to be a Man. It is about the cat of a wizard who had a spell cast on his by the wizard giving him the ability to speak. The wizard rues the day he cast that spell because the cat keeps begging him to be turned into a man for a while. The wizard eventually does so, and the innocent cat/man ventures into town, learns about the ways of the world (money, corruption), and he falls in love with a fiesty young woman. He doesn't get back in time to be turned back into a cat (he has been put in prison for not paying a bridge toll, I think) so remains a human and lives happily ever after.
 

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Here's a few:

Jenny and the Cat Club series by Esther Averill
Charlotte's Web by E.B. White (we're not partial to Stuart Little)
Pippi Longstocking series; Ronia; Noisy Village series by Astrid Lindgren
Wizard of Oz; Marvellous Land of Oz; Ozma of Oz by L. Frank Baum
Little House in the Big Woods; Little House on the Prarie; On the Banks of Plum Creek by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Five Children and It; The Railway Children by E. Nesbit
The Borrowers; Bed Knob and Broom Stick by Mary Norton
Roald Dahl
A Bear Called Paddington series by Michael Bond
Moomintroll series by Tove Jannson
Dick King-Smith (especially the Sophie series)
Alice books by Lewis Carrol
 

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There are 7 books in the Chronicles of Narnia series. The Magician's Nephew is the least exciting of them. Skip that one (which is not even necessary- it's all back story) and read the other 5:
Prince Caspian
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
The Silver Chair
The Horse and His Boy
The Last Battle


The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien (This one is more geared toward kiddos than the LOTR series. Tolkien was a contemporary and intimate friend of CS Lewis and the style of this book reflects their mutual influence)
The Waterbabies by Charles Kingsley
The Arabian Nights told by Brian Alderson
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving
The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
The Rainbow Fairy Book by Andrew Lang
The Princess and The Goblin by George MacDonald
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri

Great thread!!! I'm going to have to print off everyone's suggestions!
 

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:
 

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Terry Pratchett has some novels geared toward kids. He's modern, so they're not "classics," but they're fantasy and I think kids who like Narnia might enjoy them. There "The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents" (related to the Pied Piper fairy tale) and "The Wee Free Men" (about gnomes).
 

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Brian Jacques Redwall series.
Watership Down
Stuart Little
Beverly Cleary's The Mouse and the Motorcycle, Ralph S. Mouse & Runaway Ralph

Can you tell I like animals?
 

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Robin Hood
Peter Pan
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
The *Little House* series, we actually really enjoyed the Martha years (which are not written by LIW)
The Wizard of Oz
 

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What about...
Mary Poppins and Mary Poppins Comes Back by PL travers

Mrs Frisby and the rats of NIMH- By Robert C. O'Brien My mother and I read it when I was about 5 and I loved it, but it is very sad.
 

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I don't know whether this would be considered "classic," but the first of the Little House books, Little House in the Big Woods, was written to children around that age. Laura Ingalls Wilder advanced the writing style along with the age of the characters in the books as they grew up. It was excerpts from the first book that got us interested in reading it and all the others.
Lillian
 

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And-
A wrinkle in time By Madeline L'Engle. She's a neat writer because she has several series, and they are all interconnected. Some of the books are more mature than others tho, so you might want to read them first, or keep them in mind for a few years from now.
 

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Since others the longer, more involved books, (which we also enjoy), I'll suggest some lesser tomes.

Milly Molly Mandy (My 5 yr old loved these)
Stuart Little
Charlotte's Web
My Father's Dragon (This is a trilogy)
Mr Popper's Penguins (which I hated by all my children loved)
The Moffet's
The Box Car children (the older ones)
Ella Enchanted
 

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Oh yeah, I forgot about Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Little Princess
and
The Secret Garden
there are others.
 

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I forgot another! They just keep coming!

Not a classic, but:
The House With a Clock in its Walls by John Bellairs
there is a series- I don't remember how many, but they are very like the Narnia books in style, and well written.
and you can't forget
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
 
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