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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where to start? I have ZERO college.

Do I just cold-call the local colleges or is there somewhere to look up this info?
 

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You want to start with getting a nursing degree. You should look into community colleges, though there's usually a waiting list. Before starting nursing school it's a good idea to figure out whether you want to get an associate's degree (RN) or go into a bachelor's program. If you want to become a nurse midwife you will eventually have to have a bachelor's degree, but if you have a family to support there can be an advantage to getting an associates degree then working on you bachelor's while you work as an RN. Good luck, I have 1 2/3 semesters left on my ASN.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
right. thats what I had thought. now to make some calls and get dh on board....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks.

I called a few BSN, RN sisters and think I have a plan roughed in for now.

I'll double check with grant people and colleges before finalizing anything of course.

woohoo.
 

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May not need to get the BSN first. Frontier Nursing Service's CNEP program added a ADN to CNM track in March 2007. You enter with a ADN, earn your BSN along the way and graduate with a CNM. Then only 2-3 classes are required to complete the MSN. All of it's also distance learning, so you can do most of your book work from home.
Need to find a clinical site in your own area.
I did the RN (with a bachelor's in management) to CNM tract 10 years ago. Most of the instructors have homebirth/birth center background. The program attracts a lot of nurses with that in mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
hmmm? I was looking at Frontier too. It looks like we have a local CNM progrma here too. Though the school itself appears really snobbish.

They don't accept you PT for BSN. I'll juast have to see what the future holds. Dh and I have been discussing alot. The interim years are going to be tough (he'd have to work FT, while I go to school FT and I don't know what I'd do with the kids....) but we both think he'd do better as the SAHP once I graduate.
 

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One thing to consider... the money. I have a BSN, and then I went to midwifery school. The BSN was from a state school. Cheap tuition, no problems there.

The MSN was from a private school (the only one in my state). Big tuition.
I had to pay tuititon at the private rates for 4 semesters.

One of my classmates got a ADN at the local community college, then did the ADN to CNM program. She got the ADN at cheap tuition rates, but then had to pay for 6 semesters at the private school (additional year to get the BSN part). She could have done a bridge program of ADN-BSN in the same one year at a state school (cheaper tuition), but they wanted her to have a year of experience, and she wanted to be done with school.

Different schools, of course, are different, but the per semester tuition cost of my midwifery school was $15,000, plus books nad fees, of course. In state tuition runs about $1500 a semester. That is a big difference, that I notice in the student loan repayment months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thats a huge consideration for us as well, but we are so low income that when dh was in school he easily got the pell grant and several others which covered 100% and even some living expenses while he went to school.

I need to look into this a lot more and am appreciative of all the responses.

CNM is something I never considered before but now having served as a doula primarily at hospital births....and I don't see any change in hospitals since I birthed in one over 10years ago...I think as a nurse or CNM I could exert more change and reach more women....

we'll see.
 

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Hi,
Probably the best way to get started is to go to your local community college (preferably one with a nursing program) and get started taking your pre-requisites. Even ADN programs require some classes first and sometimes those have to be finished before you get on the waiting list. Math often hangs people up- needing to take some classes before the required one and they need to come in order. Eventually you will need to take statistics


Then, while you are on the waiting list, continue taking some of the pre-req's for BSN programs (or work as a CNA) and when you can, you can apply at BSN programs if the waiting list is still going. Don't be too put off by the amount of time you will be quoted for ADN wait lists- it usually doesn't take that long.

If you start with the ADN in mind then you can go to school, still take care of your family, and comm college IS way cheaper than a 4 year school- even if public.

If you get the ADN first, then you can work while getting the rn-bsn (which are usually online) and maybe your employer will pay for it. Your options for CNM in CO are like you have seen, Frontier or CU. Or move temporarily for another school.

How do I know all this? Am smack in the middle of it. I am a CPM now, but as I was waiting for and doing my apprenticeship for that, I took classes at the local CC. I am going to start the BSN (clinical portion- I did not do ADN first) this winter and then off to CNM/FNP afterwards. I plan at this time to continue doing home birth or maybe begin a birth center. Eventually, I will teach- nursing education.
 

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If you intend to start a birth center when you finish your CNM, I would very highly recommend CNEP at Frontier. Kitty Ernst from the American Assoc. of Birth Centers was the developer of the CNEP model and by the time you finish the three BC courses you have a business plan for how to get a BC started.

It took minor alterations in my final BC paper to change it into a BC business plan that I took to the banker and got my first loan. Kitty is one of the instructors (or used to be). She is very, very good at cutting to the core issues of how to get the business up and running and to make it a continued success.
 
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