Mothering Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does coconut milk taste like coconuts? If so, I can't stand coconuts so what can I use in its place? Most of the recipes I browsed though include coconut milk! Where in the store can you find it anyway?<br><br>
How about all the different types of flours mentioned? Can you buys those in bulk from somewhere like whole foods (they have those bulk bins). Which ones taste most similar to regular all purpose flour? Which ones would I use the most often if I like to do baked goods?<br><br>
I saw the prices today at my local regular grocery store and there is NO way I can afford to buy those flours every week. They come in such small boxes :-(<br><br><br>
I really think my son is allergic to dairy and I think my husband is allergic to wheat.. and well, I'm going on 30 and still have skin rashes and other issues even though I do everything else "right".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,747 Posts
We use rice milk sometimes, but not often because DS can't have rice. That's why we use coconut milk most of the time. Yes, it tastes like coconut, moreso in some things than others. I get it at the Asian market for $1.09/can (Aroy-D brand, no gums). That's also where I buy rice noodles, buckwheat noodles, and huge bags of rice. I'm also finding I like more diverse things now than I did before (because I have to diversify or starve).<br><br>
I don't shop in the bulk bins because it's too easy for the stuff to be cross contaminated.<br><br><a href="http://www.barryfarm.com" target="_blank">www.barryfarm.com</a> has alternative grains and you can buy them in bigger amounts. We use mostly light buckwheat flour, sorghum flour, sweet potato starch, tapioca starch (and my new one: water chestnut flour). None of them taste like wheat flour. You usually have to do a combo of a bunch of flours and add a binder (commercial places use xanthan gum, source is corn most of the time, we use karaya gum because my kids can tolerate it). Bob's Red Mill has things too (can't remember if they give bulk discounts or not). Going grain free is cheaper. But not necessarily more satisfying.<br><br>
If you think they're allergic to the foods, you could take them to an allergist and get a skin prick test. If you think they're intolerant to them, then an elimination is your best bet.<br><br>
I found when I went off the things for my kids, that suddenly I was better too. A food journal might be wise as well. Then you could track if your skin is getting better or worse (I think corn and gluten are both skin ones).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response.. do you know if the lining of the coconut milk cans has a BPA lining? I'm hesitant to use cans in general because of this<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,747 Posts
No idea. Don't even know how to find out...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
You can buy canned coconut milk, or there is a company called So Delicious that makes a carton of coconut milk. I think it doesn't have as stron of a coconut taste actually. They have an original and a vanillla flavored one (that might help cover up some of the coconut flavor you don't like). I think the carton is a half gallon and it usually costs around $3-4 a carton. My local Kroger carries it in their refrigerated section right next to the refrigerated soy milks. I LOVE it!! in the long run, it's cheaper than buying the cans. The canned ones do tend to be higher in fat than the carton though.<br><br>
Other milk alternatives would be soy, rice, almond, coconut, hemp, oat and hazelnut milks. Most of them can be found in any organic section of grocery stores or definitely at Whole Foods (but I find they are a little pricier).<br><br>
I can't help much on the flour issue as we haven't trialed many flours. I have used oat flour for things and it's pretty tastey and can be used in a lot of ways. I've heard sorghum flour is also a good option, but i haven't tried it yet. Rice flour is used in all gluten free foods and I think is pretty easy to work with on things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,747 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>rhesp1212</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14678776"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I can't help much on the flour issue as we haven't trialed many flours. I have used oat flour for things and it's pretty tastey and can be used in a lot of ways. I've heard sorghum flour is also a good option, but i haven't tried it yet. Rice flour is used in all gluten free foods and I think is pretty easy to work with on things.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
We get the highest fat coconut milk possible, and we can't have other ingredients in the So Delicious one so I didn't know it tasted different. Interesting.<br><br>
Oat flour wouldn't be gluten free, which is fine if you're just avoiding wheat. Not fine if you're avoiding gluten. Oh, millet flour is another one we use. We don't use a lot of rice flour here because DS can't have it. It can be gritty. And there's a bunch of different kinds: sweet rice flour, regular rice flour, glutinous rice flour (doesn't have gluten in it, it's just stickier).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,978 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>rhesp1212</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14678776"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You can buy canned coconut milk, or there is a company called So Delicious that makes a carton of coconut milk. I think it doesn't have as stron of a coconut taste actually. They have an original and a vanillla flavored one (that might help cover up some of the coconut flavor you don't like). I think the carton is a half gallon and it usually costs around $3-4 a carton. My local Kroger carries it in their refrigerated section right next to the refrigerated soy milks. I LOVE it!! in the long run, it's cheaper than buying the cans. The canned ones do tend to be higher in fat than the carton though.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
The So Delicious coconut milk is what I drink, too. I don't think it tastes like coconut. But it is not cheaper than coconut milk in the can because it is a coconut milk "beverage", meaning watered down, sweetened, & enriched coconut milk, really junk food, IMO. I use it in my coffee. If you don't like it, sub whatever else you want to use. Many recipes are fine with just water. Or juice. Or broth. There are many recipes that use coconut milk instead of cream/milk, where one wants the thick, rich fattiness of coconut milk. I'm thinking stuff like puddings, pie fillings, custards, ice cream, etc where an alternative milk just won't work. There is BPA in the lining of all but Native Forest brand, I believe.<br>
We are mostly paleo (meat, veggies, fruit, nuts, fat) with a small amount of rice and buckwheat, so I can't help much with flours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>deditus</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14680732"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">The So Delicious coconut milk is what I drink, too. I don't think it tastes like coconut. But it is not cheaper than coconut milk in the can because it is a coconut milk "beverage", meaning watered down, sweetened, & enriched coconut milk, really junk food, IMO. I use it in my coffee. If you don't like it, sub whatever else you want to use. Many recipes are fine with just water. Or juice. Or broth. There are many recipes that use coconut milk instead of cream/milk, where one wants the thick, rich fattiness of coconut milk. I'm thinking stuff like puddings, pie fillings, custards, ice cream, etc where an alternative milk just won't work. There is BPA in the lining of all but Native Forest brand, I believe.<br>
We are mostly paleo (meat, veggies, fruit, nuts, fat) with a small amount of rice and buckwheat, so I can't help much with flours.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
We love So Delicious coconut milk beverages at our house. And their coconut milk kefir and coffee creamer, too. (DS is especially fond of the vanilla coconut milk beverage in his cereal.) Since we don't consume dairy and try to limit our intake of soy, we find them to be a healthful, tasty alternative.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top