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How come coffee always taste better when you buy it out? I've tried different beans and brewing methods, but it never taste as good! What kind of coffee beans and maker/brewer do you use??
 

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I love good coffee. I don't drink more than 2 cups a day-usually one-but that one is so good.<br>
We just found a brand from Mexico called Zapatista (<a href="http:" target="_blank">www.caferebelion.com)</a>.<br>
As for the method, we used to use press, but realized that drip just tastes better. I don't use dh's coffee maker; I don't think it tastes clean and I don't want to use the commercial cleaners (vinegar didn't seem to do the trick-I've tried the commercail cleaners and they do work, but they are most likely something nasty). So I use a little funnel that sits on my cup with a paper filter (it one of the only disposable things I use-I swear! The reusable ones don't taste clean either.). I use a about 2-3 heaping tablespoons per coffee mug.<br>
This is a darn good cup of coffee.<br>
Enjoy that sunshine bean.<br><br>
Allie
 

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Maybe it is the coffee bean to water ratio.<br><br>
Let me know if you figure it out. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Could be your water. Do any of the places you drink it out sell their beans? What kind of machine are you using? What roast are you buying?<br><br>
I prefer the coffees we make at home for the best flavor, and like go out for the treat of having someone else make it and people watching. We use the equal exchange French roast, local water (we have to periodically clean our machine with vinegar), and a francis francis x1 espresso maker. You can get some real high end machines, but for years we had a krups with a water pump and it made beautiful shots, too. When we made brew coffee, we had a machine with a carrafe to keep the coffee in- air tight and not on a burner (makes coffee bitter and thick to sit on a burner). Good Luck.
 

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I had this problem too. Then I started having dh make me my coffee and it is great! He doesn't drink coffee, and I don't know what his secret is. My guess is love. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"><br><br>
Try it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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I totally know what you mean- I think it is psychological. When DH makes me coffee or tea for me it is just so much better than when I make it myself.
 

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I've actually stopped drinking coffee at home because I just really didn't like how my coffeemaker made it taste. I don't know what to do about it, I really love coffee, I mean LOVE IT. It makes me sad to think about it. I don't know if it's the coffeemaker or the ratio or what, but I just couldn't get it right, so now I drink tea. Which is fine, but it's not COFFEE!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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I have always found that until recently. I picked up a french press at a thrift shop for like $3, and I buy President's Choice (store brand) organic beans for less than $5/bag, and now suddenly I bypass Tim Horton's becoz it tastes better if I make it at home! So rich and sweet tasting. Yum. I'm drinking some right now, gawd I love coffee! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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You can make good coffee yourself! It's simple:<br><br>
1) Start with high-quality coffee (I like dark roasts near to the color of a French Roast). If possible, use a burr grinder at home to grind coffee. If not, grind at store, being sure to get grounds the proper size (i.e., large grounds for french press, fine grounds for filter). Store grounds in freezer in a tightly closed container.<br><br>
2) Method of brewing: the best-tasting is french press, the second is using a simple <a href="http://www.fantes.com/coffeemakers_manualdrip.htm" target="_blank">cone</a> with a paper filter. If you click on the link, it takes you to a page with several cone styles; I use the porcelain one that fits over a coffee cup.<br><br>
3) Use high-quality water.<br><br>
4) Make sure water is at proper temperature: boiling or near-boiling.<br><br>
5) Use right amount of grounds: at least 2 TABLESPOONS per cup of coffee.<br><br>
6) Health tip: don't use the "white death" powders or coffee creamers, as they often contain partially-hydrogenated oils (a.k.a. trans-fats).<br><br>
7) Enjoy!
 

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I like to use beans that are freshly roasted (within a week of use), and grind them just before using. I use filtered water and brew it into a thermal carafe.
 

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Using freshly ground quality beans makes a huge difference, having the appropriate size grind for your brewing method, and using the right amound of grounds (as others mentioned). I love using a Chemex drip cone style, or a moka pot (stovetop espresso maker). Vacuum pots make fabulous coffee, but are kind of a pain to use. My hubby roasts coffee at home, so I'm spoiled that way, can't tell you a good brand of beans to buy. Even if you're not interested in home roasting, check out <a href="http://www.sweetmarias.com/" target="_blank">http://www.sweetmarias.com/</a> for more than you ever wanted to know about coffee, including a great section on brewing in their coffee library.
 

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It doesn't taste the same at home because a home coffee maker can't get the water nearly as hot as the machines they use in the coffee shops. You can improve the flavor at home by cleaning your machine, using filtered water, and using good quality, fresh-ground beans, but it'll never be quite what it is when you buy it.<br><br>
If I'm ever rich, I'm buying a commercial coffee maker for my house! For now, I just never, ever buy that awesome coffee, so I enjoy the stuff I make at home a little more.
 

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i agree that freshly ground beans makes a world of a difference. we usually buy equal exchange, but my favorite is buying a good bean roasted locally, grinding it fresh every morning and we use a stove-top percalator. turns out great.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AJP</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7264767"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I love using a Chemex drip cone style, or a moka pot (stovetop espresso maker).</div>
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Chemix cones are the best! I used to have one, but broke it years ago. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/gloomy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Gloomy">:<br><br>
Thanks for the URL for that site—looks interesting.
 

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I just wanted to reiterate the main points that any coffee geek (myself included) would recommend.<br><br>
Water, Grind,Temperature.<br><br>
So would argue grind is first, which is a fair point given that over or under extracting can kill you brew, but for the most part I think water is more important. Bad water == bad coffee.<br><br>
In practical sense, pick a method that works for you. There a lot of ways to brew. Most have been mentioned, but the short list in order of grind size (large to small) is:
<ul><li>Press Pot</li>
<li>Percolator (bleech!)</li>
<li>Flat bottom drip</li>
<li>Cone Filter Drip</li>
<li>Melita (paper cone)</li>
<li>Italian Stovetop</li>
<li>Espresso</li>
</ul><br>
There's more inbetween and they all have their differences. Some are more obvious than others. The main ones being, for example, anything that involves paper or cloth will remove some of the oils from the brew. That causes a slightyl different flavor. Espresso is a quick extraction with a very small amount of water. Consequently the flavor is more intense. Most drip machines are flat or cone drip makers. So there's no diff there.<br><br>
So for example, at home I have Starbucks Barista Aroma Grande.(yes, it's Starbucks, but it's a decent machine.) It puts out a decent temp, has a good carafe for the coffee, and a removeable resovoir. At work I have a B&D Cup-at-a-time. I loooove this thing. It's so simple. It's a small metal cone filter and has a resovoir that can be filled with one mugs worth of water. Push a button and 2 minutes later I have a fresh brew cup of coffee. It doesn't hurt that Intelligensia is a couple blocks from the office so I get brews roasted that same week. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br><br>
And actually that's a good avenue is to get a brewer that goes directly into a carafe. Nothing kills a pot of coffee faster then baking it for an hour on an heating element.<br><br>
Sorry for the ramble there. I get all excited talking about coffee. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
[/B]
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Chicharronita</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7263860"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You can make good coffee yourself! It's simple:<br><br>
1) Start with high-quality coffee (I like dark roasts near to the color of a French Roast). If possible, use a burr grinder at home to grind coffee. If not, grind at store, being sure to get grounds the proper size (i.e., large grounds for french press, fine grounds for filter). Store grounds in freezer in a tightly closed container.<br><br>
2) Method of brewing: the best-tasting is french press, the second is using a simple <a href="http://www.fantes.com/coffeemakers_manualdrip.htm" target="_blank">cone</a> with a paper filter. If you click on the link, it takes you to a page with several cone styles; I use the porcelain one that fits over a coffee cup.<br><br>
3) Use high-quality water.<br><br>
4) Make sure water is at proper temperature: boiling or near-boiling.<br><br>
5) Use right amount of grounds: at least 2 TABLESPOONS per cup of coffee.<br><br>
6) Health tip: don't use the "white death" powders or coffee creamers, as they often contain partially-hydrogenated oils (a.k.a. trans-fats).<br><br>
7) Enjoy!</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for all the replies!<br><br>
We currently use a French press. I boil bottled water, let it sit for a minute or two before poring into the press. I grind the beans right before I make it. I am unsure about how fine to grind them, maybe that's the problem? I'll have to experiment! I usually grind them for 10-12 seconds, kind of coarse. The directions with the French press said not to grind them too small.<br><br>
We use to use a flat bottom drip, but it never tasted that great.<br><br>
I think the last beans I tried where organic med. roast Peruvian. I had some Kona that was a gift, it was good, but not as rich and flavorful as I like.<br><br>
I'd like to get an espresso maker I LOVE espresso (well, lattes!)<br><br>
I do think it may be somewhat mental. Salads always taste better if someone else made them too!<br><br>
I'll try some of the bean recommendations. We like it pretty dark, flavorful, and rich but not burnt or acidic.
 

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If you like fuller bodied, but not too acidic, I'd recommend you try Indonesian blends or a good Ethiopian Harrar. South American origin beans, I find, tend to be a little to bright for my taste. Which is not to say they're all that way. Find a local roaster and just ask. I was pleasently surprised with a blend that was of Indonesian and Central American beans. Really good. <a href="http://www.intelligentsiacoffee.com/store/coffee/blends/berkeleys" target="_blank">Berkley's Blend.</a><br><br>
hth<br><br>
e<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>*green*faery*</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7276479"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thanks for all the replies!<br><br>
We currently use a French press. I boil bottled water, let it sit for a minute or two before poring into the press. I grind the beans right before I make it. I am unsure about how fine to grind them, maybe that's the problem? I'll have to experiment! I usually grind them for 10-12 seconds, kind of coarse. The directions with the French press said not to grind them too small.<br><br>
We use to use a flat bottom drip, but it never tasted that great.<br><br>
I think the last beans I tried where organic med. roast Peruvian. I had some Kona that was a gift, it was good, but not as rich and flavorful as I like.<br><br>
I'd like to get an espresso maker I LOVE espresso (well, lattes!)<br><br>
I do think it may be somewhat mental. Salads always taste better if someone else made them too!<br><br>
I'll try some of the bean recommendations. We like it pretty dark, flavorful, and rich but not burnt or acidic.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>thismama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7263348"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have always found that until recently. I picked up a french press at a thrift shop for like $3, and I buy President's Choice (store brand) organic beans for less than $5/bag, and now suddenly I bypass Tim Horton's becoz it tastes better if I make it at home! So rich and sweet tasting. Yum. I'm drinking some right now, gawd I love coffee! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"></div>
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<br>
i love it more<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/loveeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Loveeyes">:
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Chicharronita</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7263860"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You can make good coffee yourself! It's simple:<br><br>
1) Start with high-quality coffee (I like dark roasts near to the color of a French Roast). If possible, use a burr grinder at home to grind coffee. If not, grind at store, being sure to get grounds the proper size (i.e., large grounds for french press, fine grounds for filter). Store grounds in freezer in a tightly closed container.<br><br>
2) Method of brewing: the best-tasting is french press, the second is using a simple <a href="http://www.fantes.com/coffeemakers_manualdrip.htm" target="_blank">cone</a> with a paper filter. If you click on the link, it takes you to a page with several cone styles; I use the porcelain one that fits over a coffee cup.<br><br>
3) Use high-quality water.<br><br>
4) Make sure water is at proper temperature: boiling or near-boiling.<br><br>
5) Use right amount of grounds: at least 2 TABLESPOONS per cup of coffee.<br><br>
6) Health tip: don't use the "white death" powders or coffee creamers, as they often contain partially-hydrogenated oils (a.k.a. trans-fats).<br><br>
7) Enjoy!</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
You beat me to it! I was just going to say, the flavor of the coffee is controlled by how long the water is in contact with the beans, and as it turns out the French Press or the simple cone drip method actually work the best.<br><br>
(Personally I don't like dark roast because the longer the bean is roasted the less caffine it has.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> )
 
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