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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've not made any decisions about putting my home schooled daughter in a gifted program or in school. I'm just in the process of determining our options. She has passed the first two hurdles to qualify for a full-time gifted program. The final step is an IQ test.<br><br>
Up to now we've just talked about "going in to have some fun with this really nice lady I met." And "helping us find things out about how you learn." (Thanks to moms from a previous thread!) But this last test is administered by a psychologist unknown to me or my daughter. My daughter is very sensitive and I'm a sahm and I've never been one to just leave her with someone unknown. So that alone could raise her anxiety.<br><br>
I'm not familiar with IQ testing. Can I say it will be like playing games? How can I describe it to her that doesn't put pressure on her but where she doesn't come out of it thinking, "No, mom. It wasn't anything like that and I don't think I can trust you anymore."<br><br>
As a home schooled bright only child, I feel like there's a lot going on here that complicates things for us. I hope you can understand my desire to keep it vague.
 

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You could explain that at school children get lots of puzzles, quizzes and tests, and that allows teachers to figure out ways to help them learn best. However, with homeschooling, there's very little of that sort of thing. In order to help you make the best decisions about how to educate her, you would like some help in figuring out how her brain learns best. It's important that you get an accurate picture so that over time, you can give her what she needs. So you've found a person who can work with her to really figure out how her mind works.<br><br>
You're not <i>exactly</i> sure how it will work, but this person is an expert at this sort of thing and they've had many years of experience at working with children like her. You know the person will be kind and good at their job. There will be word questions and puzzles and some things that are easy and some that seem tricky. Parts of it might be really fun, parts of it might just feel a bit like work. It's not important that she get everything correct -- it's not that kind of thing -- it's designed to figure out how her brain works when she's trying hard, that's all.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"><br><br>
Dunno. Is that the sort of thing you were thinking of?<br><br>
Miranda
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's exactly what I was looking for. If this thread gets lots of views it's because I'm looking it over again and again trying to get it to feel at home in my brain. Explanations have always been very tricky for me.<br><br>
Thank you!
 

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I told my DD that it would be "playing games and doing puzzles with a nice lady." I told her that we would find the best school for her based upon this. My DD loves being the center of any nice adult's attention and loves playing games/doing puzzles, so that explanation was fine for her. My DD also doesn't exhibit strong perfectionist tendencies or anxiety so I don't think she felt judged by the test person. If I were you, I'd confidently assert a simple message to her about it and as long as she agrees to it, assume she'll do fine.
 

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If the psychologist is unknown to you, then it may help to at least have a telephone conversation or brief consultation with her first, before the actual IQ session. That will help you identify anything that you may have to prepare your dd about. For example, the psychologist that assessed my dd had a fairly strong foreign accent. It threw dd a little, even though she hears a number of different accents every day. I've always been suspicious about some test results, because dd wasn't sure she understood all of the instructions and questions.<br><br>
I would also explain why you can't be present in fairly simple terms. It's important that she concentrate, so you don't want distractions like other people in the room (including mom). Let her know you will be close by though.<br><br>
There are different types of IQ assessment instruments, so it's hard to know exactly what she will be asked to do. Generally, they test a variety of cognitive abilities with vocabulary, comprehension skills, pattern recognition, memory skills, spatial reasoning puzzles etc.
 

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I explained to my DDs that the test would keep getting harder, and that she won't know how she did based on how hard it seems, because everybody keeps going until it gets hard for them.<br><br>
Both my DDs enjoy IQ testing.
 

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For what it is worth, we were in a similar situation - reserved homeschooled kid who had not been left a lot. I expected more questioning but really a chipper puzzles and questions to figure out how he learns so we could make plans was all it took. It turned out to be no biggie at all.
 
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