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I have given up all hope of having a garden in the ground here in the desert. but I desperatley would like to grow some of our own veggies (organic). is it possible for me to grow veggies (year round) in containers? we get hot rainy summers and mild winters. I am in zone 9 I think.


I would like to do a pizza & salsa garden and grow salad greens. what varieties are best for growing in containers? also can salad greens be grown in hanging baskets?

anyone have any useful links,tips or advice? TIA!
 

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I have grown tomatoes, cayenne, okra, melons (in a large container w/ vines on a chain link fence), little limes, garlic, and tomatillos very well in containers.
Get a great potting mix and water everyday. Containers dry out very quickly and with this heat, lots of water keeps them going.
I have grown cherry tomatoes in hanging baskets.
I saw Martha Stewart (haha) do a container lettuce garden before. I always grow lettuce in the ground, though.
Roma tomaotes did the best for me in containers.
 

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DH and I just bought our first house last year and are working on getting our garden going. But we always lived in apartments before this, so gardening in the ground was not an option. We had big container gardens, however, including tomatoes and onions and herbs and strawberries and peppers and eggplants and on and on. I am also in Zone 9, although not in the desert. I'm in Central Florida, and one of the biggest problems we had to figure out was where to put the containers so they got enough sun to keep of the mold without getting so much that the plants died from the heat.

The best book I ever read about container gardening was a book published in the 60s called The Apartment Farmer: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/087...e=UTF8&s=books It is out-of-print, but I was able to get it through interlibrary loan. The great thing about this book is that it tells you the volume of dirt that different plants need in order to survive. Tomatoes, for example, need 5 gallons. And he also gives some creative ideas for what can be used as a container.
 
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