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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.starjournalnow.com/2016/12/22/pertussis-forces-public-health-balancing-act/#_

OCHD nurse Rob Deede explained that pertussis, also known as whooping cough, begins with cold-like symptoms, with a cough that continues to get worse. Vaccinations are making identifying and diagnosing pertussis more difficult, because the symptoms are not as severe, but the patients are just as contagious. Additionally, there can be a long incubation period before symptoms begin.
“After you are exposed to someone contagious, there is up to a 21-day incubation period,” Deede said. “So, three weeks you could potentially be brewing pertussis before you become contagious. Seven days leading up to the cough you are contagious and once you start coughing you are contagious for [another two to three weeks] or after five days of antibiotics.”
Shutting down the schools is the solution being used for this particularly broad outbreak.

Struck me as an unusually realistic article.

Vaccine failure is causing real world problems. :eek:
 

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I find it very interesting the parents and coaches are resisting school closure due to sports. One would think safety comes first.

The comments are quite lame and show a lack of understanding regarding how ineffective the pertussis portion of the vaccine actually is in preventing disease transmission. Real education on the subject is lacking (perhaps sacrificed on the altar of vaccines are magical pixie dust?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I find it very interesting the parents and coaches are resisting school closure due to sports. One would think safety comes first.

The comments are quite lame and show a lack of understanding regarding how ineffective the pertussis portion of the vaccine actually is in preventing disease transmission. Real education on the subject is lacking (perhaps sacrificed on the altar of vaccines are magical pixie dust?)
Yes, I was struck by the silly tone of the comments in contrast with a fairly thoughtful article. People just can't believe that vaccines FAIL to protect. Overdosed on propaganda I suppose.
 

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I find it very interesting the parents and coaches are resisting school closure due to sports. One would think safety comes first.

The comments are quite lame and show a lack of understanding regarding how ineffective the pertussis portion of the vaccine actually is in preventing disease transmission. Real education on the subject is lacking (perhaps sacrificed on the altar of vaccines are magical pixie dust?)
Sigh. The comments. I think part of the problem is that any media story or post that highlights reported cases or an outbreak is immediately swamped with comments to "Vaccinate your kids!" even if the reported cases are adult. Or previously vaccinated.

There's a measles outbreak in Sydney right now. All adults, 20+. One is a NSW resident and presumably likely previously vaccinated (given the consistently high compliance rate touted by the gov't). The other two are overseas travellers, so status uncertain. What is not debatable is that all are adults and responsible for their own health care decisions, yet when the story is on social media, it generates an avalanche of "you anti-vaxxers are killing us all with your disease magnet kids" type of posts.

BTW a couple of responses I read over the past couple of days to this story were way too sensible. A few people mentioned having been fully vaccinated with the MMR, having gone for their rubella titre (prenatal check), and surprise, no detectable measles immunity either. Yet there is no official policy as far as I can see in the Immunisation Handbook that advises physicians to check the measles immunity of adults (both male and female). There's just an underlying assumption that protection is lifelong and so, no reason to ascertain anything, and there's no MMR boosters on the schedule for adults. It's just an example of how the so-called "anti-vaxxer" problem may sometimes be a product issue and a policy flaw, but no one wants to put the effort in to address those particular issues.
 

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Don't give them any ideas!:nerd:
:laugh:LOL. I'm surprised they haven't recommended it as a result of the outbreaks that keep happening in adult populations here. They haven't acted because 1) they probably feel these cases are some kind of unusual anomaly and that there is no problem with waning immunity and the MMR and 2) for effective uptake, it would need to be government funded. Like the men B vaccine is available now and if parents are willing, they are free to purchase it privately, but most of the parents in the news refuse to, stating that the government should be the ones to cover the costs. It would be the same with any MMR booster for adults. Very few would do it routinely in the absence of overseas travel or prospective pregnancy unless the government was picking up the tab.
 

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I remain surprised that no 3rd MMR has been suggested - perhaps in late teens, and primarily for mumps (but we do see some issues with the measles portion as well).
 

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:laugh:LOL. I'm surprised they haven't recommended it as a result of the outbreaks that keep happening in adult populations here. They haven't acted because 1) they probably feel these cases are some kind of unusual anomaly and that there is no problem with waning immunity and the MMR and 2) for effective uptake, it would need to be government funded. Like the men B vaccine is available now and if parents are willing, they are free to purchase it privately, but most of the parents in the news refuse to, stating that the government should be the ones to cover the costs. It would be the same with any MMR booster for adults. Very few would do it routinely in the absence of overseas travel or prospective pregnancy unless the government was picking up the tab.
I wonder how many "pro vax" parents would suddenly become selective parents if the vaccines they chose for themselves and their children were no longer "free (paid for by the gov't or health insurance)?"

Sus
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I wonder how many "pro vax" parents would suddenly become selective parents if the vaccines they chose for themselves and their children were no longer "free (paid for by the gov't or health insurance)?"

Sus
The recommended schedule from birth to age 18 costs well over $3,000 by now. We should do the research and post a thread.
 

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I wonder how many "pro vax" parents would suddenly become selective parents if the vaccines they chose for themselves and their children were no longer "free (paid for by the gov't or health insurance)?"

Sus
Exactly.

The Men B one is what intrigues me. There are parents over here just incensed and livid that the government does not fund it. They are free to purchase it themselves. Sure, it's about $450 AUD for a whole series, but if it's that important to parents, you find a way to pay for it.

Kids are expensive, that's just a fact of life. DS had a severe stutter (blocks, repeats, prolongation, the whole nine yards) when he started primary school. I could have waited for public services, but the waiting list was over two years long. Two years is a long time for a little kid who was starting school and could not manage one fluent sentence. So, we went private. It was definitely not cheap at $90 per 30 min session with the top specialist in the state, but his stutter was completely gone in two years. But it meant no holidays for us for those two years. If it's important, you find the money somehow.
 
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