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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My MIL was here this last weekend and was very interested in purchasing for us a cord blood bank for our first born (due this July). I had the intention of letting the cord complete pulsating fully before it is clamped and cut and if we go the route of banking we wouldn't be able to do that.<br><br>
What are your thoughts re: the cord blood banking idea? It is still new enough and unknown enough to me that I find myself really hesitant for some reason. I appreciate any and all insights.<br><br>
Thanks,<br>
Susan
 

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I really liked my doctors stance on cord blood banking.. I will quote from one of his newsletters.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Our practice has always considered cord blood to be extremely important. This is why we have always done “late cord clamping” to allow the blood that is present in the placenta and in the umbilical cord during the first ten to fifteen minutes following the birth, to transfuse spontaneously into the baby. Nature in her wisdom has provided a dual oxygen supply for babies during the transitional period following birth. The placenta continues delivering oxygenated blood to the baby until his lungs are fully expanded and functioning. Swedish researchers have shown that the increased blood volume resulting from the post-delivery placental transfusion helps the newborn’s lungs to expand by increasing the pulmonary blood flow. Furthermore this iron rich blood which often measures 50 ml. (1-1/2 ounces) provides iron stores for the baby during the initial six months following birth, because breast milk is relatively low in iron.</td>
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I had a nice chuckle about this:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">So if anyone asks you whether you want to bank your baby’s cord blood, the answer is: “If his blood is that valuable, I want it to remain in his body where it belongs!”</td>
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Here's a <a href="http://www.elvovemd.com/a/newsletters/1202.htm" target="_blank">link to the full article</a>, it's the second one on the page. It gives a bit of a history on early cord clamping and other interesting things like that. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much for that excerpt - it's exactly where my thinking was - if it's that great, shouldn't we want the baby to have it all?!?<br><br>
Any other thoughts?
 

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As you explore this, if you end up interested in banking, you should really look at private verses public banking. I just googled, so I"m not sure about the specific site I pulled up... it was just one that came up with a comparison on public vs. private.<br><br>
I had collected a bunch of info when I was pg in 2004, but I can't remember the name of the company that I thought was pretty good (we didn't do anything).<br><br>
I seem to remember that it is possible to let the cord pulsate for awhile and still get a small cord blood dontation. I'm not sure exactly how that worked, but I do know that it was something interesting to consider. At the time, you had to have a hospital that was linked to a public bank, but I have since noticed that some of the public cord companies willl send the kit out and your doctor, midwife, or nurse (or even someone at a home birth) can collect the blood- so ANYONE can do it.<br><br>
I would have been happy to consider public cord banking, if I was able to let the cord pulsate and collect a small amount of blood- of course, the consideration would be how much blood is needed to assure a successful donation.<br><br>
Public Donation vs. Private/Speculative Storage<br><a href="http://www.nationalcordbloodprogram.org/donation/public_vs_private_donation.html" target="_blank">http://www.nationalcordbloodprogram...._donation.html</a><br><br><br>
My understanding is that many public banking do allow family 'storage' for families that have a known genetic disposition, but the majority of blood is available to anyone who needs it.<br><br>
The main issue that I'm aware of is that often times you CANNOT use the child's own blood if a need comes up (here's a blurb I found to explaine it<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">However, parents should know that a child's own cord blood (stored at birth), would rarely be suitable for a transplant. It could not be used at present to treat genetic diseases, for example, because the cord blood stem cells and their descendents would be affected by the same condition.</td>
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Of course, I see the point that if the blood is so great, you would want the baby to have all of it, but I would also think that public banking of a small amount of blood might have some merit too.<br><br>
Jessica
 

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I too am torn on this issue-<br>
I understand that she can use the blood at birth before clamping. Our midwives collect later than the hospital, which means a smaller sample. My older child was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (an autoimmune disease) and my sister has an autoimmune condition as well . The strides being made in research and development with stem cells are exciting to us, and we view banking this baby's blood as a sort of insurance (although we may never/be able to use it.) diabetes is one of the areas that looks promising for cord blood stem cells. I'm still not certain what to do. My husband believes that banking the blood is the obvious choice.
 

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We get our children's cord blood saved through a private company called ViaCord. We paid up front (about $1500), but they have a ton of different payment plans if you want to pay over as many as 10 years, I think. It's been a while since we did it, so I may be off with the #s, but we'll be doing it again for this new little girl. It's another one of those 'personal choice' issues that requires you to read up a lot before you make the decision that's best for your family.
 
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