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I will not be banking our cord blood. I just don't see the possible benefits being solidifed enough or proven to the extent that the cost becomes reasonable:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">'Families may be vulnerable to emotional marketing at the time of birth of a child and may look to their physicians for advice. No accurate estimates exist of the likelihood of children to need their own stored cells. The range of available estimates is from 1:1000 to 1:200,000. Empirical evidence that children will need their own cord blood for future use is lacking. There also is no evidence of the safety or effectiveness of autologous cord blood transplantation for the treatment of malignant neoplasms. For these reasons, it is difficult to recommend that parents store their children's cord blood for future use.'</td>
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AAP<br><br>
I donated my son and daughter's because I gave birth in hospital and its not like I needed it for anything. I won;t this time because of homebirth.<br><br>
But there are a lot of resources available for the blood, not banking your own child's is not a death sentence if they get one of the problems the blood is suppose to help treat...there will still be treatments available and banked blood.
 

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I've heard that you can't donate or bank with delayed cord cutting. As my ds had low iron problems we will be waiting until the cord stops pulsing before cutting it this time around to make sure the baby gets every last bit of blood. I don't know how much it will help, but getting a little one poked every couple months to check iron levels is not any fun.
 

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Yes, that's also true. I am now a believer in delayed cord cutting and we will be doing that with this birth. Had I know the benefits, I might have chosen not to donate with our other two.<br><br>
I know believe babies need all that cord blood goodness.
 

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We'll be waiting at least until the placenta is born to cut the cord- definitely until it is completely stopped pulsing at the very earliest, so no cord blood banking for us. I have not seen any research that convinces me that it's better to save the blood and immediately deprive the baby during third stage than to just let nature take its course and have as uninterrupted a third stage as possible. I also have ethical concerns with the cost of cord blood banking, and the fact that it's really only something that well-off people can afford to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
where are you finding good information on the third stage, and not cutting the cord till it stops beating?
 

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<a href="http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/117/4/1235" target="_blank">http://pediatrics.aappublications.or...act/117/4/1235</a><br><br><a href="http://www.nature.com/jp/journal/v23/n6/abs/7210970a.html" target="_blank">http://www.nature.com/jp/journal/v23.../7210970a.html</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analyses revealed that the DCC group were more likely to have higher initial mean blood pressures (adjusted OR 3.4) and less likely to be discharged on oxygen (adjusted OR 8.6). DCC group infants had higher initial glucose levels (ICC=36 mg/dl, DCC=73.1 mg/dl; p=0.02).</td>
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(DCC= delayed cord clamping)<br><br><a href="http://www.springerlink.com/content/1e3rxxpbfn4e2va7/" target="_blank">http://www.springerlink.com/content/1e3rxxpbfn4e2va7/</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">It reduces the need for packed red cell transfusions during the first 6 weeks of life.</td>
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<a href="http://indianpediatrics.net/feb2002/feb-130-135.htm" target="_blank">http://indianpediatrics.net/feb2002/feb-130-135.htm</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Conclusions: Iron stores and Hb in infancy can be improved in neonates born to anemic mothers by delaying cord clamping at birth.</td>
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<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed&uid=11783688&cmd=showdetailview&indexed=google" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/en...indexed=google</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Immediate clamping of the umbilical cord can reduce the red blood cells an infant receives at birth by more than 50%, resulting in potential short-term and long-term neonatal problems. Cord clamping studies from 1980 to 2001 were reviewed. Five hundred thirty-one term infants in the nine identified randomized and nonrandomized studies experienced late clamping, ranging from 3 minutes to cessation of pulsations, without symptoms of polycythemia or significant hyperbilirubinemia. Higher red blood cell flow to vital organs in the first week was noted, and term infants had less anemia at 2 months and increased duration of early breastfeeding. In seven randomized trials of preterm infants, benefits associated with delayed clamping in these infants included higher hematocrit and hemoglobin levels, blood pressure, and blood volume, with better cardiopulmonary adaptation and fewer days of oxygen and ventilation and fewer transfusions needed.</td>
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You can google scholar for more!<br><br><a href="http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/maney/atp/2004/00000024/00000001/art00001" target="_blank">http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conten...00001/art00001</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">We conclude that delayed cord-clamping in term infants, especially those with anaemic mothers, increases haemoglobin concentration in infants at 2-3 months of age and reduces the risk of anaemia, without an associated increased risk of perinatal complications.</td>
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Great links above! Here are 2 more articles by Sarah Buckley:<br><br><a href="http://www.sarahjbuckley.com/articles/leaving-well-alone.htm" target="_blank">http://www.sarahjbuckley.com/article...well-alone.htm</a><br><br><a href="http://www.sarahjbuckley.com/articles/lotus-birth.htm" target="_blank">http://www.sarahjbuckley.com/articles/lotus-birth.htm</a>
 

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We banked DD's cord blood (with CBR) but DIDN'T cut the cord. That said, we didn't get a very good volume. So while I know it's possible, it doesn't necessarily get you an ideal result.
 

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Not the popular choice on this site but I did nor blindly make my decision either...I weighed both sides before making my choice.<br><br>
I did it last December with my son Jack and will do it again with my April baby. My reasoning is this...we did IVF to get pg with my son and after reading all about IVF and how it got started and where it is today I was amazed at the progress. 20-something years ago in order to do IVF doctors had to wiat for one single egg to be ovulated and hope to extract it, fertilize it and then transfer an embryo back...it was a rare procedure and very obscure and uncommon for most people to ever need...just those with tubal issues like myself. Fast forward to today and IVF is very very commonplace...it is used to treat all sorts of infertility problems. I used that comparison to make my decision. Does CBB cure a lot of diseases...today maybe not, but medical science progresses so quickly, who knows what can be cured within the next few years.<br><br>
It really is a very personal decision. You have to do what works for you and makes you feel most comfortable.<br><br>
BTW, We used CBR.<br><br>
Also, we are not "well-off"...I'm a teacher and my DH's salary is on par with mine.
 

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It's true that cord blood banking will probably do a lot in the future, but, to moms who can't afford it, don;t worry because there is TONS of blood in public banks and donations. Even on the major cord blood web sites, they usually use stories of babies who have been saved by cord blood that was NOT their own!! There is even a public cord blood network (read more in article below). In addition, one of the major reasons use of cord blood is so rare is because of alternative and preferable treatments that are available.<br><br>
This is not to knock down anyone who wants to bank their own, all the power to you! But for those who can't afford it or want to delay clamping, don't get all worried or uptight!<br><br>
Good article on this:<br><br><a href="http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/news/2006/01/70091" target="_blank">http://www.wired.com/science/discove.../2006/01/70091</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Doctors rarely use a child's own cord blood to treat disease, according to Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg, director of the pediatric blood and marrow transplant program at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. In fact, doing so could be dangerous because self-transplantation would reintroduce a genetic defect that first caused a given disease, she says. Moreover, cord blood from public banks is usually preferable because standards "for collection, testing, processing and storage are higher."</td>
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">That may be true, but those parents who choose not store their children's cord blood in a private bank need not worry. Scientists will be able to get all the cord-blood stem cells they need from the new public cord-blood network. And scientists are also identifying stem cells in a variety of new sources -- hair follicles, fat and, remarkably, even in children's baby teeth.</td>
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And "well off" to many is diffferent. Having 1800-2000 in liquid cash for the initial fee is, even to many in the USA right now, a lot of money. And the 100-300$ yearly fee is also a lot after bills and necessary savings for many people. And that doesn't even take into account companies that charge for the collection kits, shipping and doctors that charge extra fees for collection.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sarahmck</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9888597"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We banked DD's cord blood (with CBR) but DIDN'T cut the cord. That said, we didn't get a very good volume. So while I know it's possible, it doesn't necessarily get you an ideal result.</div>
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This is true and sample size is another big issue in the debate. one of the major problems with private banks is that they often do not have a large enough sample; in addition, often a full sample is not large enough to accomodate a pre-teen and older because of their body size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
such great dialog, thank you, I am determined to start reading all the pro's and con's during the next month. Some times I feel overwhelmed, but then remind myself that everything will be ok no matter what.
 

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Sabai...we are due the same day!
 

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We chose to let Bear get all his blood from the onset. It was a homebirth and I'm not even sure they do banking here. It just seems like a good idea to let them have it when nature intended. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Datura</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9892236"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We chose to let Bear get all his blood from the onset. It was a homebirth and I'm not even sure they do banking here. It just seems like a good idea to let them have it when nature intended. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"></div>
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It is true that private/commercial banks are illegal in some countries (France and Italy, for example), and, in others esp in the EU, it is strongly discouraged as unethical. In addition, there are far more regulations in many other countries (the EU especially) than there are in the USA.<br><br><br><br>
Another thought about adult cures- the sample taken from an infant is almost always too small for an adult. Studies have shown that most adults looking to benefit from cord blood would be able to use their own/ a relatives but would also rely on donated blood through public banks. Which is yet another reason to cut down on private banks and encourage national ones.
 

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After lots of thought and discussion we decided to bank our son's cord blood with CBR. We look at it as an insurance policy for his future and don't forget that the cord blood cells could also possibly be used to cure blood relatives as well. If somehow my son's cord blood help my Grandmother with Alzheimer's or my Father-in-Law with Parkinson's what a great gift that would be!<br><br>
I do agree that it should not be a source of guilt if a new Mom cannot afford it because it is certainly expensive. We opted for it as a gift from the Grandparents rather than tons of clothes and baby gifts.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>carriebft</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9888763"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">And "well off" to many is diffferent. Having 1800-2000 in liquid cash for the initial fee is, even to many in the USA right now, a lot of money. And the 100-300$ yearly fee is also a lot after bills and necessary savings for many people. And that doesn't even take into account companies that charge for the collection kits, shipping and doctors that charge extra fees for collection.</div>
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Even by that definition, I'm still not well off. I'm your average middle class mom. We took the payment plan where CBR gives you a credit card and when our tax check comes in March, we will use that to pay it off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
blue irises that is so cool, and even cooler that you are waiting to find out. My DH didn't want to wait and he can't keep secrets.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sabai</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9894139"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">blue irises that is so cool, and even cooler that you are waiting to find out. My DH didn't want to wait and he can't keep secrets.</div>
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DH was desperate to know last time...he needed to know if he was having a male heir...so ridiculous, as I was always like well what if it is a girl anyway, I didn't want to know but caved...this time I'm sticking to my guns. I'm excited about the surprise...DH still wants to know but now b/c he just wants to prepare stuff...we have everything we need for the most part...just need some seasonally appropriate clothing since this is a spring baby this time...
 
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