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Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody done this? It sounds like an amazing thing to do.<br><br>
My only concern is that it would require immediate cord clamping which would deprive my baby of the cord blood supply. Is this a selfish reason not to do the donation?<br><br>
I have to ask if my birth center will even do it at my next appointment but wanted to research it further first.
 

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I do not see how allowing a newborn to keep his normal blood supply, rather than depriving him of a substantial amount of blood at a very vulnerable time in his life, could be considered "selfish."
 

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I don't see protecting my babies' health as selfish. It's kind of my job, isn't it? If they could wait til the cord stopped pulsating, they could have whatever was left. I wouldn't deprive my own baby of cord blood for the sake of science, personally.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It isn't for science. Its as a donation for someone who needs a stem cell transplant. The cord blood could potentially save someones life.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>3daughters</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10252594"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It isn't for science. Its as a donation for someone who needs a stem cell transplant. The cord blood could potentially save someones life.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">: Donating cord blood is an incredible gift--I would recommend it to anyone. I know that not clamping immediately is a big thing among moms on here, and I completely understand it, but if you do decide to donate the blood, thank you so much--you may have saved someone's life.
 

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We did not clamp immediately and we were still able to donate.
 

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There was no blood left when we cut the cord, so there is no way we would be able to donate.
 

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We donated cord blood when my son was born. I felt really good about the decision and know that it may have really helped someone. I have a wonderful certificate from the Cord Blood Bank that is in his baby book that says "I helped save someone's life today by donating my cord blood". I think that pretty much says it all.<br><br>
But, I also agree that delayed clamping is good (my gut tells me this, though the statistics on infant outcomes don't back it up - apparently term babies do just fine WITHOUT their cord blood too).<br><br>
I think it's a personal decision and you shouldn't feel "selfish" for "keeping" your baby's cord blood. That said, I'll likely do it again with my upcoming birth.
 

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There was actually a study recently at the university hospital in my city that showed the benefits of delayed cord clamping.
 

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I did! I wouldn't have clamped early to donate, because I think it's important for my baby to get his blood, but we had enough even after the cord stopped pulsing.<br><br>
We used a company that also took the placenta - sadly I no longer remember the company's name, but it was the only one at the time (2 years ago) that would use the placenta too. There's a lot of blood in there, even long after the cord stops pulsing. Now, this company wasn't donation-only, they also did research. (But I figure the research can save lives eventually as well, so that was okay with me. We would have just thrown the placenta and cord away otherwise, since at the time I'd never heard of eating it or planting it or any of the things people do.) So that might not be exactly what you're looking for, if you want to be certain that the donated blood is used for transplant, but I figured it was worth mentioning. The company even sent a courier out to the Farm the next day to pick up the kit (and he got lost, but eventually found the place). <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>the_lissa</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10253371"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">There was actually a study recently at the university hospital in my city that showed the benefits of delayed cord clamping.</div>
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Cool can you post the reference? I keep looking for one on pubmed and all I come up with are studies showing benefits for pre-term babies. Nothing conclusive for full-term babies that I've seen, though I'd love to see one.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>hapersmion</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Now, this company wasn't donation-only, they also did research. (But I figure the research can save lives eventually as well, so that was okay with me.</div>
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Right - I think most of the companies who do this ask permission to both donate the cord blood and to use it for research. The company that I gave through - LifeSource I think - specified that their research was specifically on the topic of cord blood banking (I suppose they must need cord blood to figure out the best ways to store, transport, test etc. cord blood for donation, so this makes sense to me). Either way, I'm a medical researcher and I think it almost always benefits society either directly or indirectly.
 

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<a href="http://dailynews.mcmaster.ca/story.cfm?id=4586" target="_blank">http://dailynews.mcmaster.ca/story.cfm?id=4586</a>
 

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Great reference - thanks!
 

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You're welcome. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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I think donating cord blood is easy to accept because premature cord clamping is so standard in hospital obstetrics. Would parents agree to have 100 ml of blood drawn directly from their newborn, and donated for research? Probably not, but it is essentially the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I see it this way. My first 2 kids had their cords clamped immediately and only because I was uneducated and it was hospital procedure. They were both fine. In this case the early cord clamping is for a higher purpose and the baby will also be fine.<br><br>
I will ask if there is a middle ground. Maybe they can delay the cord clamping for a while but not until the cord is completely limp so they can still get blood out of it. That way the baby still gets the majority of the blood.
 

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We donated AFTER the cord stopped pulsing to a PUBLIC bank. Personally, I think if you have that option and dont mind a tiny bit of paperwork, why not!<br><br>
There is the company we used (maybe others)... our sent the kit to us, for free, so you can donate even if your hospital does not do a collection, as long as your doctor or midwife will do it. ((Seems like it has to be in a hospital though, but as long as a midwife signs it you might be able to leave the 'hospital' blank. I never did call and ask aobut home birth specifically))<br><br>
Our midwife suggested that we take a look at their policy for what they do if the sample is not okay for donation as many times the sample is not viable for donation, but is suitable for research.<br>
She was fairly confident she could get a viable sample AND wait till the cord stopped and she was able to get the right amount.<br><br><a href="http://www.cryo-intl.com/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.cryo-intl.com/index.html</a><br>
The also do private/for fee storage for those that want that option.<br><br>
The work: Not much paperwork, a couple short forms. I was required to send a blood sample with the donation- they run an hiv screening on that, and that was fine by me, I don't mind having my blood drawn. I did not even notice that my midwife was taking the sample. She drew the blood later on when I asked her to (we had 24 hours to do that in). We had our doula call the 800 number as required to tell them we had a baby, and then call back when the paper work is ready (they then call a courier to pick it up at the hospital). It was really very little 'work'.<br>
The biggest work was because the midwife missed a signature and we had to track her down, which meant Fedex couldn't be called yet -- and since we left the 1st day we ended up mailing it ourself since it was a Saturday.<br>
So the one thing I wish we had done was talk to the hospital about it ahead of time so they would have been willing for us to just leave the package at the nurses station.<br><br>
Good luck!<br><br>
Jessica
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>3daughters</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10265705"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I will ask if there is a middle ground. Maybe they can delay the cord clamping for a while but not until the cord is completely limp so they can still get blood out of it. That way the baby still gets the majority of the blood.</div>
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It doesn't work like that (I thought it might too, but when I researched it further, I found it didn't).<br><br>
The blood moves between the placenta and the baby, pumping in and out, and eventually stops when the baby's blood pressure is optimal.<br><br>
You can delay it "a little" and leave too little blood in the baby, or too much blood in the baby.<br><br>
I've also observed anecdotally that the correct amount of blood in the baby results in varying amounts of leftover blood. It seems like the most common amount of leftover blood is "zero" or close to it, but other babies left to set their blood pressure naturally leave some leftover blood.<br><br>
IMHO the best way to approach it is to let the baby take all the blood they need, then attempt to collect any leftover blood AFTER the cord stops pulsating.<br><br>
Chances are, you won't get any or enough . . . but you might. Some parents have been able to successfully donate with this method.<br><br>
I personally tried it and there was NO blood left (3 women tried - midwife, her assistant, and my mother who is a nurse). This makes me all the more glad that I did not force my newborn to donate a significant amount of blood during the first minute of her life.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>laohaire</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10270772"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Chances are, you won't get any or enough . . . but you might. Some parents have been able to successfully donate with this method.</div>
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When I researched this before my dd's birth, most of what I found indicated the opposite, usually there would be enough left. In fact, it stated that the cord blood could be collected after the placenta was delivered- and not to change the protocol to collect it... but that was the company I found, some do require early clamping.<br><br>
Here was one site that was helpful (scroll, it is toward the end) and a few selection of quotes from birth professionals commenting on the issue:<br><a href="http://www.gentlebirth.org/archives/cordIssues.html" target="_blank">http://www.gentlebirth.org/archives/cordIssues.html</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The presenter stressed that they need 60 to 150 cc of blood, although any sample should be sent because they were able to save 30cc once</td>
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.<br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">We've gotten several requests from clients to donate when they show up at the hospital, and we didn't know anything about it. But it has to be set up months in advance between the client and the company. It's a good thing to talk about during prenatal visits so they can decide and have time to arrange it.</td>
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">we definitely did NOT cut the cord early! Not at all. You can still do it after cord stops pulsing!</td>
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">From a Cord Blood Educator:<br>
They usually do clamp and cut the cord early BUT it depends on the family's preference and the doctor doing the collection. If the family is doing the collection out of need for stem cells (for the baby's sibling or mother), they almost always clamp and cut early to guarantee an adequate collection, for families collecting it "just in case" many delay.</td>
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I just don't see any disadvantages to <span style="text-decoration:underline;">donating</span> cord blood AFTER the cord has stopped pulsing, as long as one is okay with how the cord blood may be used by the organization the cord blood is donated to.<br><br>
Jessica
 
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