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When dd was born, our midwife left the cord intact until it stopped throbbing. This is what we wanted, so that for whatever reason, if she needed oxygen, it would be from the cord first. Well, shortly after her birth, she was jaundiced really bad. Billi levels went to 28. She was a few points away from a blood transfusion.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> The explaination we were given was that my blood type and hers did not match, so when she was born, the blood from the cord started attacking her blood. Or something like that. (Details are a bit fuzzy...it was a really rough time) Anyway, the doctor said it could and most likely would happen for subequent births, because of the blood types of dh and I (can't recall what they are at the moment)<br>
My question is-if I want to do a homebirth for the next babe, should we clamp the cord immediately? Or wait again? When I had dd, my milk took FOREVER to come in (5 days!) so we supplemented with formula to get her bowels going (she didn't poo for the first 3 days) I know that I'll most likely still be bfing dd when #2 is born, so the milk should be in. Plus I'll have some pumped just in case. I'm worried because to me, she didn't look yellow. At all. But to the doctors and LC's she was very yellow. I'm worried I wont even know if the next baby is jaundiced. I'm going to assume that it is the case and do the filtered light for the first few days, but I wont know if the levels are getting way up there. Help!
 

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I'm sorry, I don't have an answer for you...but I wanted to add a question.<br><br>
That cord supplied your baby with nutrients/oxygen/blood in the womb. Why would the last few minutes of the oxygen/blood cause a problem for your baby? There's nothing *new* coming from the cord to the baby that wasn't there in the womb...so why would the last few minutes cause problems? (Right?)<br><br>
Sorry, just really confused and hadn't heard of that before. Hope a wise one here can shed light for you.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:
 

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Even before your milk comes in, sucking should help with blood sugar levels.<br><br>
Other than color and the bili levels did your baby have any indications of illness? Did she act sick? Since waiting for the cord to stop pulsing is the physiologically normal thing to do (think about it, it can't have been intended that all baby primates bleed out their bellybuttons) there's a school of thought which says that being somewhat jaudiced is a normal state for newborns. That perhaps there's a purpose for the extra redblood cells that we don't know about yet.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MayBaby2007</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7917570"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm sorry, I don't have an answer for you...but I wanted to add a question.<br><br>
That cord supplied your baby with nutrients/oxygen/blood in the womb. Why would the last few minutes of the oxygen/blood cause a problem for your baby? There's nothing *new* coming from the cord to the baby that wasn't there in the womb...so why would the last few minutes cause problems? (Right?)<br><br>
Sorry, just really confused and hadn't heard of that before. Hope a wise one here can shed light for you.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:</div>
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Yea, this makes no sense to me either since mama's blood and baby's blood never mix.
 

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I agree that it doesn't make any sense. The blood doesn't mix unless there's an injury of some kind. The cord blood is the baby's blood, not yours.<br><br>
Your milk will probably dry up during pregnancy, and just like with your first baby, you'll have colostrum in the beginning and your milk will come in after some time. My milk took 6 days to come in with my 1st (though she was fine just on colostrum for that time and even regained her birth weight which, IMO, most homebirth babies don't even lose but that's another story). WIth my 2nd it only took a day and a half.
 

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DD was jaundiced, and i didn't see it at all. i went for a weight check and nursing consult at the local bfing center and they wouldn't see me until i went to the ped. so don't feel like you are the only one who doesn't notice! i just thought it was her daddy's skin color showing thru. she was feeding fine, i think milk came in around day 3. as for the whole blood types not matching, i have no idea, but am curious about the answer!
 

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It sounds like ABO incompatibility. YOUR body made antibodies against her blood type (because you are o and she was A or B, I'm guessing) and those antibodies got into her blood and started breaking down her red blood cells.<br>
If the cord is clamped immediately, she'd have slightly less blood volume than she would if it were allowed to stop pulsing on its own. Also, fewer of the antibodies from you would be present. The theory is, therefore, she'd produce less bilirubin (a byproduct of the blood cells being broken down.)<br>
I was skeptical that this would work but my last daughter's cord was cut <i>immediately</i> (against my wishes) when she was born because they "needed" to scope and deep suction her on a table four feet away from me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br>
Her bili levels tested high end of normal after 24 hours and then immediately dropped. Before her, my second, third, and fourth children all had noticably high levels of bilirubin. I'm type O and all five of my children are type B. Now I don't know what I'll do with the next child's cord. I want him/her to stay connected as long as needed but I hate to risk days and days of jaundice treatment if clamping the cord can potentially prevent it.<br>
Maybe these links can explain it better:<br><br><a href="http://www.drhull.com/EncyMaster/A/ABO_incompatibility.html" target="_blank">http://www.drhull.com/EncyMaster/A/A...atibility.html</a><br><a href="http://pediatrics.about.com/od/weeklyquestion/a/04_abo_incmplty.htm" target="_blank">http://pediatrics.about.com/od/weekl...o_incmplty.htm</a>
 

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I agree that leaving the cord intact until the placenta is born allows the baby not only to get what he/she needs, but also to RETURN the blood that she doesnt'.<br><br>
The issue with the jaundice sounds like an ABO incompatibility, but also impacted further because your milk didn't come in for quite a while. A jaundiced baby is fine, but a baby that isn't able to get milk to process out the red blood cells is not.
 

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I don't know much about the blood part of your question. I think you might have more success with your question in the "birth professionals" forum.<br><br>
But I just wanted to add that I have read that colostrum helps baby pass the meconium and helps prevent or take care of jaundice. So definitely let your next newborn keep breastfeeding as much as he/she wants to. So you don't add to both potential problems. I guess supplementing only if you need to.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mommy2abigail</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7916990"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm worried because to me, she didn't look yellow. At all. But to the doctors and LC's she was very yellow.</div>
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I just wanted to pipe in on this. My DD was jaundiced - bili at 21, not as bad as yours, but still over the critical limit and requiring hospitalization.<br><br>
I had a home birth. I read about jaundice as well as other items, because I was taking on the responsibility of our health and for looking out for potential issues. Everything I read said that jaundice was common but rarely a big deal. However, I realize after the fact that these books assumed the baby was born into a hospital with medical care that would have spotted and managed the jaundice long before I did. Nothing I read mentioned the problems breastfeeding and the relationship with jaundice, either. We had a poor start due to a bad latch, I guess - I told my midwife I didn't think she was getting anything and the midwife pooh-poohed me and said she was fine. (Another lesson learned).<br><br>
Anyway, I read about the yellowing and my baby didn't look yellow to me either. I was thinking, you know, YELLOW. Like the Cheerio box color. Instead, she was DARK. Sort of like olive skin tone. Since I didn't know my baby yet, I assumed she had darker skin than me or DH. It wasn't unreasonable, since my mother has olive-toned skin (still very light). It never occured to me that she was jaundiced.<br><br>
So, I just wanted you to know you weren't the only one. I wish I had known more - and gotten better information - on identifying jaundice before it was such a large issue. Perhaps we could have avoided a hospitalization, which was traumatic for both me and DD.
 

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Do not cut the cord! The baby looses 40% of their blood supply when you do so. Hospitals give the Vitmin K shots to your newborn to avoid clotting in the brain. However, if the baby recieved all the blood it needed the risk of clotting is so slim that the shot is not needed which is good becuase it is linked to leukemia!
 

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Okay, wow. I've never heard that early cord clamping can prevent jaundice that's caused by ABO incompatibility. In fact, I've never heard of <span style="text-decoration:underline;">any</span> scientifically proven benefits to cutting the cord while it's still pulsing, short of when it's tightly wrapped around the baby's neck.<br><br>
Jaundice is most frequently caused by ABO issues. Type O moms are the most likely to have babies with the disorder. I'm type O and my husband is type A, so I'm going to be on the lookout for any jaundice in my baby from the get-go.<br><br>
Mom's blood and baby's blood don't mix, this is true, but the antibodies from mom's blood do get to baby, because they're small enough to pass the membrane. In fact, they're <i>designed</i> to pass the membrane. That's how the baby has immunity to some things at birth, and it's also why Rh- moms are encouraged to get Rhogam, because if their baby is Rh+ then they create anti-Rh antibodies that attack the baby in utero.<br><br>
Ask your provider how to check for jaundice. True jaundice goes below the nipple line. The best way to check is to get the baby mostly naked, in full-spectrum light, and press on the skin above and below the nipple line to observe the color change. It's been years since I've actually done the test, and that's all I remember, so someone else will have to fill in the details or correct me if I'm wrong.<br><br>
But whatever the cause, jaundice is NO reason for fear-mongering and chastising you for your decisions, whatever they are (vit. k included!).
 
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