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My 7 yr old son woke up on Friday morning with hives on his upper chest/neck and upper back and then later they progressed down one arm. He was allergy tested when he was 2.5 and has several allergies show up. Up till now he has had bumpy skin (on his legs/arms) which is allergy related but no hives. I was so concerned when he woke up like this. When I talked with his teacher he had no problem foods the day before -- but on Wed. afternoon he was given a peanutbutter/jelly sandwhich at school. We were told he was "mildly" allergic to peanuts way back when he was 2 and we've just avoided peanuts since then -- he's never had it as far as I can remember (if he did it was right at age 2 before he was tested and only 1x) no one in our home eats peanut butter, either. Is it even possible that 1.5 days later to react? (The rash could have happened anytime overnight though).<br><br>
UPDATE: I took him the allergist today and sure enough he came back a 4 to peanuts (and some other stuff: soy/pea/legumes/tomatoes/corn) and 2s and 3s to a few others. It was most likely the peanuts that caused the rash the dr. said.
 

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Yes- that is completely possible. Peanut allergies are one of the few foods that people usually DON'T grow out of, so I would be really careful. I would have him retested, and get an epipen ASAP if you don't already have one. Each exposure could cause a worse reaction.
 

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Did you get an epi pen (or two, you need two if possible)?
 

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Was the school not aware of the allergy? It seems an odd food to give to a child these days, with peanut allergies cropping up everywhere. I'm glad you got some answers from the allergist. I second the epipen idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kjbrown92</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15419440"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Was the school not aware of the allergy? It seems an odd food to give to a child these days, with peanut allergies cropping up everywhere. I'm glad you got some answers from the allergist. I second the epipen idea.</div>
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He wasn't officially "allergic" to them ... the last time I got him tested (at 2yrs old) it came back as mildly allergic to peanuts with other worse allergies (like rice and fish). So, I did verbally tell his teacher that we don't give peanuts/peanut butter (for my own peace of mind) but without a dr. putting it in writing, apparently, they will still give them. This was the first time all year because the power had gone out and they couldn't serve a hot lunch. Had I been called and told about that, I would have brought a lunch. From now on I will pack lunch because he is also level 4 to soy, corn and tomatoes which is in just about everything prepackaged, it seems.<br><br>
I will be homeschooling next year, anyway, so hopefully this will never be a problem again. The dr. sent in a prescription for an epi-pen for him.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Adamsmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15419465"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">He wasn't officially "allergic" to them ... the last time I got him tested (at 2yrs old) it came back as mildly allergic to peanuts with other worse allergies (like rice and fish). So, I did verbally tell his teacher that we don't give peanuts/peanut butter (for my own peace of mind) but without a dr. putting it in writing, apparently, they will still give them. This was the first time all year because the power had gone out and they couldn't serve a hot lunch. Had I been called and told about that, I would have brought a lunch. From now on I will pack lunch because he is also level 4 to soy, corn and tomatoes which is in just about everything prepackaged, it seems.<br><br>
I will be homeschooling next year, anyway, so hopefully this will never be a problem again. The dr. sent in a prescription for an epi-pen for him.</div>
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It's just with peanuts, I'm surprised that a school would be that cavalier about something like that. Peanuts can progress to worse, and one of the ones that you're not likely to outgrow. I should never be surprised at schools though!<br><br>
Corn is definitely a hard one to avoid. Soy is a little easier only because it's spelled out on packaging because it's a top-8 allergen (is it called out on Canadian labeling?). Though between the two (and gluten and dairy) we can't do much of anything prepackaged either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kjbrown92</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15419487"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It's just with peanuts, I'm surprised that a school would be that cavalier about something like that. Peanuts can progress to worse, and one of the ones that you're not likely to outgrow. I should never be surprised at schools though!<br><br>
Corn is definitely a hard one to avoid. Soy is a little easier only because it's spelled out on packaging because it's a top-8 allergen (is it called out on Canadian labeling?). Though between the two (and gluten and dairy) we can't do much of anything prepackaged either.</div>
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I know what you mean about the peanut butter. I couldn't believe it, either. This same school gave DS (after I told them and put in writing that he gets diarrhea from milk) gave him a milk several days in a week. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Adamsmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15419505"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I know what you mean about the peanut butter. I couldn't believe it, either. This same school gave DS (after I told them and put in writing that he gets diarrhea from milk) gave him a milk several days in a week. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"></div>
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I guess it's not that surprising at all then. Yikes. You'll need an epipen at the school then, and one for home.
 
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