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<p>We are technically omni and probably always will be (so I am not looking for a discussion on that), but I'm trying to be "semi-vegan" ( I know, not such a thing haha). I say that instead of semi-vegetarian as many vegetarians I know are happy to eat tons of cheese from fast food sources (I know that isn't MDCers, I'm talking about other people I know hehe). I'm trying to use very minimal dairy and eggs from humane sources.</p>
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<p>The positives with this transition is my digestion is much improved, and I feel it is the right decision for us for our health, the environment and our budget.</p>
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<p>Couple things I am running into: 1. getting enough protein/staying full after breakfast and 2. our grocery budget has just been slashed to $250/month (for 2 people in Southern California). </p>
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<p>For #1 DH is mostly on board, except would rather eat the cheapest eggs every day to be full after breakfast. We can't afford farm-fresh eggs in that quantity (maybe a few times per week). Things like whole grain/seed hot cereals (oatmeal, amaranth, etc) though they have a decent amount of plant protein simply do not maintain our blood sugar in the AM. Even when we plan a snack 2-3 hours later. I prefer not to eat a lot of soy (though a couple times a week is fine). I also prefer not to eat a lot of denatured food like protein powders. </p>
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<p>The only vegan thing that really seems to work for breakfast is LOTS of nut butter on whole grain English muffins or peanut butter in oatmeal. Even a couple tablespoons of nuts/seeds in hot cereal isn't working. </p>
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<p>We feel fine with high carb dinners, even just brown rice and veggies is fine. It's breakfast that we need to figure out.</p>
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<p>As for our super tight budget, all in all it doesn't seem that eating predominately vegan is any cheaper than being omni...if you are doing it right. Correct me if I'm wrong. I want to get my omega-3's from plant sources..so stocking up on walnuts and hemp seeds is just as costly as meat/fish.</p>
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<p>Anyone else have a similar budget and eating decently? I have accepted that our budget only allows for mostly frozen veggies, non-organic (except any animal products, soy and corn I am prioritizing to get organic), and I'd like to stay stocked up on at least 1 super food like hemp seeds. </p>
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<p>Sorry this is all over the place, just needing some ideas =). Thanks!</p>
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<p>Pretty much the cheapest, highest quality food source there is out there is sprouts. I would start sprouting! :) You may have to eat a lot to fill you up but if you are growing them on your own sooooo cheap! And a lot is just good for you.</p>
 

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<p>I make tofu scrambles and egg fried tofu a lot. I also love a big scoop of crock pot cooked mixed beans on a slice of toast spread with Earth Balance. I also find that adding vegetables, especially spinach, cabbage and kale to my breakfast adds staying power. Baked sweet potatoes topped with almond butter are also an awesome breakfast. And tempeh marinated in soy sauce, liquid smoke and then baked or fried is great, too.</p>
 
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