Mothering Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just another example of how bad a disease can be if there's a vaccine for it.<br>
CP- kills 100 people a year, 11,000 hospitalized (about half of the deaths are adults, and adults are way more likely to have to be hospitalized for it than kids) those numbers are from BEFORE the vaccine was introduced.<br>
"About 1 child out of 500 who get chickenpox must be hospitalized." (that's .2%, right?)<br><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nip/diseases/varicella/faqs-gen-disease.htm" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/nip/diseases/vari...en-disease.htm</a><br><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/Parents-Guide/pg-varicella.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/...-varicella.pdf</a><br><br>
RSV- Kills between 1250 and 2500 kids a year, hospitalizes 125,000<br>
"During their first RSV infection, between 25% and 40% of infants and young children have signs or symptoms of bronchiolitis or pneumonia, and 0.5% to 2% require hospitalization." (between 1 and 4 out of 200, or between 2.5 and 10 out of 500)<br><a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001564.htm" target="_blank">http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/e...cle/001564.htm</a><br><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/revb/respiratory/rsvfeat.htm" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/revb/...ry/rsvfeat.htm</a><br><br>
So why is it that the CDC makes cp sound so scary... And rsv sounds not-so scary?<br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Still, serious problems do occur. The blisters can become infected, and some children get encephalitis (<b>infection of the brain</b>). Of every 100,000 infants under one year old who get chickenpox, about 4 <b>die</b>. For older children, 1 to 14 years old, about 1 in 100,000 <b>dies</b>. If a woman gets chickenpox just before or after giving birth, her baby can get very sick, and about 1 in 3 of these children <b>die</b> if they are not treated quickly.</td>
</tr></table></div>
my bold<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia among infants and children under 1 year of age. Illness begins most frequently with fever, runny nose, cough, and sometimes wheezing. During their first RSV infection, between 25% and 40% of infants and young children have signs or symptoms of bronchiolitis or pneumonia, and 0.5% to 2% require hospitalization. Most children recover from illness in 8 to 15 days. The majority of children hospitalized for RSV infection are under 6 months of age. RSV also causes repeated infections throughout life, usually associated with moderate-to-severe cold-like symptoms; however, severe lower respiratory tract disease may occur at any age, especially among the elderly or among those with compromised cardiac, pulmonary, or immune systems.</td>
</tr></table></div>
no mention in the whole doc about death.<br><br>
Oh yeah, it's because they have a vax to sell for cp. Just another reason to distrust everything that comes from the cdc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,476 Posts
Well, that will be interesting Long Island, because anyone who knows their history wil know about the old RSV vaccine, which actually resulted in the 'reverse' happening, with kids who had the vaccine, when coming into contact with it, getting even sicker and dying. So it was hidden real fast.<br><br>
And then there is this from the CDC link above.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The majority of children hospitalized for RSV infection are under 6 months of age. RSV also causes repeated infections throughout life, usually associated with moderate-to-severe cold-like symptoms; however, severe lower respiratory tract disease may occur at any age, especially among the elderly or among those with compromised cardiac, pulmonary, or immune systems.</td>
</tr></table></div>
So if you canna get immunity from the disease, of what use will a vaccine be? Apart form Wall street that is...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,835 Posts
RSV in fact, DOES have a vaccine, so I'm not sure what the OP's point was??? it sounds like you were trying to say that they make CP sound scary because they have a vaccine to push and they make RSV, which is actually a much deadlier disease, sound not-so-scary, because it doesn't have a vaccine? That might be an interesting point...except, of course for the fact that they DO have a RSV vaccine?? (however, it is not a part of the general immunization schedule, it is only recommended for preemies and babies with respiratory problems.) OR, have i totally misunderstood here???<br><br>
On to my next point of confusion...... RSV, or Respiratory syncytial virus, is NOT the same thing as "Rotavirus". So why are the two being used interchangeably in this thread? RSV is a respiratory virus, Rotavirus is an intestinal virus ....The rotavirus is the one that was taken off the market a while back because it was causing deaths....(well, WE all know all vaccines cause deaths, but this one was directly and immediately causing so many they couldn't hide it...lol).....i think maybe Long Island got confused about the difference between RSV and rotavirus...and started off on a different topic??......<br><br>
Perhaps I am just in crazy land today?<br><br>
adios,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,813 Posts
No, it's me in crazyland! Thank you! For some reason I thought they used those initals for rotavirus! I deleted the text to avoid confusion so the thread can go in the right direction! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blush"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Yes, the soon-to-be licensed Rotateq vaccine is for rotavirus, <b>not</b> RSV!<br>
Sorry for any confusion!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,074 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bobandjess99</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">RSV in fact, DOES have a vaccine, so I'm not sure what the OP's point was??? it sounds like you were trying to say that they make CP sound scary because they have a vaccine to push and they make RSV, which is actually a much deadlier disease, sound not-so-scary, because it doesn't have a vaccine? That might be an interesting point...except, of course for the fact that they DO have a RSV vaccine?? (however, it is not a part of the general immunization schedule, it is only recommended for preemies and babies with respiratory problems.) OR, have i totally misunderstood here???<br></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Synagis is not a vaccine, but an immunoglobulin. And yes, it is only given to "at risk" preemies during the winter season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,074 Posts
And doesn't it cost like $1000 bucks a shot? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yikes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!"><br>
Which you have to get each month?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,835 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>annalily</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Synagis is not a vaccine, but an immunoglobulin. And yes, it is only given to "at risk" preemies during the winter season.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<br>
Okay, thanks! I misunderstood, i thought it was a vaccine...but it does make sense that it is an immunoglobulin...not being the mom of a preemie, I never researched it like I have most of the vaccines.....I have just heard it always lumped in with the vaccines, so I thought it was a vaccine...my mistake <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,733 Posts
RSV for most other age groups is a very self limiting virus.<br>
My third child was hosptialized with it last winter at four months of age, the scariest few days of my life. He was premature but 'only' a month so it was never offered (*I'd have probably said no, my oldest two have never had an infection, chickenpox they have immune systems like teflon!)<br><br>
By the time we got him to hospital he low on his oxygen sats but happy and smiling, even the nurses didn't think he was sick they got another machine thinking it was broken went from finger to finger to toe to last toe and went holy crap...<br><br>
but my middle one has athmsa so i could see the chest 'pull' when he breathed...I wish there was more education about rsv as it wouldn't surprise me if it is a major cause of sids...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,476 Posts
The RSV injections:
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The product, palivizumab, is a genetically engineered antibody against the RSV virus. This antibody is manufactured using human and mouse antibody genes and can be produced consistently on a large scale.<br><br>
Palivizumab is the second product licensed for RSV disease. The first one, RSV Immune Globulin Intravenous (Human) (RSVIGIV) is made from human plasma and is marketed as RespiGam by MedImmune Inc, Gaithersburg, Md, the same company marketing palivizumab.<br><br>
Both palivizumab and RSVIGIV are approved for use in high risk infants under two years old with lung problems related to chronic bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or prematurity. Both products were found effective in reducing the number of hospitalizations due to RSV.<br><br>
Although both products must be given in five monthly doses, the new product, palivizumab, is given intramuscularly, rather than by intravenous infusion over a period of hours. In addition, palivizumab is more concentrated than RSVIGIV, an advantage since infants with certain pulmonary diseases may retain excess fluids.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Antibodies like this, have a half life of 28 days, and do not induce antibody production from within the body.<br><br>
That is why they want a vaccine.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Momtezuma Tuatara</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">The RSV injections: Antibodies like this, have a half life of 28 days, and do not induce antibody production from within the body.<br><br>
That is why they want a vaccine.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
And as soon as they have one, RSV will suddenly become a disease that we all need to panic about.<br>
Sorry- I guess my boyfriend's foul mood about all this is rubbing off on me. lol<br>
I'm just really irritated at how carefully they choose their words, and present their figures, to get their way. kwim?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,343 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Deva33mommy</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">And as soon as they have one, RSV will suddenly become a disease that we all need to panic about.<br>
Sorry- I guess my boyfriend's foul mood about all this is rubbing off on me. lol<br>
I'm just really irritated at how carefully they choose their words, and present their figures, to get their way. kwim?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
What gets me is how many people just fall for it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,968 Posts
One of the foster moms I work with just told me last night that the 5 mo she has in her home just started the 6 month round of the RSV vaccination. I had no idea that there was one. She told me that the ped gave her a list of risk factors and that if your child had 2 or more that they then applied to the insurance co to see if they would pay--she told me it was 1500 an injection and the baby would get an injection once a month for six months! The disturbing part to me was that the risk factors included being in daycare, bottlefeeding, living in confined quarters ( more than 3 people in the home) and I thought to myself that described most of the low income families that I work with and they are all on state insurance funded by my tax dollars.<br>
This ped is crazy anyway imo, he also got the family to start putting cereal in the baby's bottle at 5 weeks to help with reflux.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Sounds just like my son's pediatrician.<br>
My son was born August 11, 2005 prematurely (3 weeks) but weighing in at 8lb 2 oz. I had placenta prevea and it was an emergency c-section. His lungs weren't fully mature and he was in NICU for the first 5 days. By the 7th day, they told me he was completely fine and ddin't need any oxygen or special medicine. We went home and 3 days later, I took him to the ped for his first check-up. He weighed in at 8lb 8oz and the doc said he was fine. Next appointment was a month later and my son weighed 12lbs 10 oz and the doctor said he was doing great but this time the doc mentioned something about the rsv shot and all he really said was that he would advise for my son to get it since he was premature and in NICU after he was born. He said he was going to talk to Margaret about whether it could be approved for my son. I have no idea who Margaret is and I never questioned anything more about it because I figured we'd discuss it more at my son's next appointment. The doc wanted my son to get vaccinated that day with the 2 month shots, but I said I'd bring my baby back at a later time for that. He also told me I could use a teaspoon of cereal in the bottle for every ounce of breastmilk or formula because I said that my son spits up often from formula and the doc mentioned reflux. My point was that he doesn't when I breastfeed. Anyway, I planned on doing research about rsv and the synigris shot, but before I even got a chance to, the office called and told me they had the shot and for me to bring my son in. I've been putting it off for the last couple weeks now, but we're supposed to go in Monday at 1 pm. I'm still not sure about this shot. My son has been doing great since we got out of the hospital. He is not in day care and in fact, I pretty much shelter him from everyone else except his own family. I have germ-x bottles in every room and I encourage my other sons wash their hands as often as possible. Their ages are 17, 14, and 12 so they understand how important it is to keep germs away. The 17 year old is home all the time with us at the moment and the other two do go to middle school. So besides more than 3 people living under one roof, I don't think my son has the other risk factors for the rsv shot. I need some advice please! I haven't found many negative things about the rsv shot, but if my son really doesn't need the shot, I don't want to have to put him through it.<br>
He hasn't even sniffled yet and I'd hate to have to take him to the doctor's office every month and risk getting germs from there.<br>
Any advice would be appreciated!<br>
Thank-you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,959 Posts
My son had RSV at 8 weeks. We all had it - and I got a lovely case of bronchitis seeing as I was so totally depleted at that time. It was certainly very scary to see my little kiddo sick. He was getting EBM and formula, but had recently started getting 100% BM b/c I started taking herbs to kick up the pumping...<br><br>
Point is that the stats, treatment protocols, etc. for RSV are devised based on solely formula fed infants. BF babies handle RSV completely differently, and have very different outcomes than FF. Even though DS had gotten formula, he actually sailed through a serious illness (I'm sure he was sicker b/c of the formula he did get), with the only complication being that we were needlessly dragged through the hydrolic machine that is the ER. (Too lengthy a story to explain here...) He suffered so many useless risks to his health by being sent there, and by the time I tore the staff new ones over the rediculous lack of thought they showed in their testing protocols, they sent us home within the first day, without explanation, and not having done one damn thing to treat the RSV. Just breastmilk pumped from a livid and exhausted mother.<br><br>
Not that I wanted their treatments - he did just fine. It was just such a farce.<br><br>
The FF babies I saw in the RSV wing were pathetic. My heart still aches when I think about all the infants who had been lying alone in their cribs for 2 weeks. They were too weak and hoarse to even cry. There was scarcely a parent in sight. Nurses came and went with the bottles. Very sick babies were just alone.<br><br>
This was the expectation we were explained when DS was admitted. Didn't happen that way for us. My lactation doc told me that most solely BF babies get RSV too, but it's "just a cold" and the parents don't bring them in, or give the slightest thought to it being RSV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Thanks for your reply.<br>
I didn't get to breastfeed while we were in the hospital and when we got home, my baby wouldn't/couldn't latch on because he was so used to the nipples from the bottles the nurses gave him at the hospital. I also had inverted nipples. I pumped and pumped for a month or so and about had just given up when my son finally latched on. I now try to breastfeed whenever he is hungry, but my supply is so low. What herbs did you find to increase your milk supply? I have been substituting with formula after I breastfeed because my son is just so hungry and no more breast milk is coming out.<br>
Will this affect the rsv if my son does get it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,959 Posts
I just wrote and edited a good reply that took 45 minutes (b/c of lots of distraction), and lost it! Arggg!<br><br>
The jist was that I hope I understand correctly that your DC is not sick with RSV?? You are spectulating about the chances of getting it and having poor outcome?<br><br>
If you're asking if I would personally get the immunoglobin b/c DC got formula - no way. I trust my DC's body, even when it's vulnerable. I do my best to provide the natural environment his body expected to live in... Not really possible, but I don't add to the toxin load. I manage illness naturally when it does happen. (And I have LOTS of years of practice at finding what works though my own journey of unplugging from the allopathic "Matrix".) Lots of things improve outcome, like constant holding and touching too. Having DC sleep upright on your chest... These things count for a lot.<br><br>
I simply don't spend a moment worrying about the illnesses "out there" that DS might get. I put my effort toward keeping him healthy - clean eating, laughing, touching, playing, etc... and let him handle the particulars.<br><br>
Well, sorry I didn't post the well-thought-out reply... Hope this quickie one touched on all the points...<br><br>
ETA: I took fenugreek and later More Milk Plus from <a href="http://www.motherlove.com" target="_blank">www.motherlove.com</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,457 Posts
Hi,<br>
Aira - not sure where you are getting your info on bfed vs ffed babies and RSV...it sounds like it makes sense, but my full-term, previously healthy, solely bfed DD just got out of the hospital for RSV complications (she was on oxygen, nebulizer treatments, chest PT and suctioning). We were there for 5 days and while it was hell, I am thankful she is on the upswing.<br><br>
Maybe she is just an anomaly....I am now hoping she doesn't get anything else this winter, but with an older sister I suppose that's wishful thinking....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,476 Posts
Nancy, I would get hold of a copy of your hospital files, and have a look at the immunological profiles. And if they didn't do them, I'd be asking why.<br><br>
Do you have immunodeficiencies in your family? Be aware that if they only do serum protein, that will show nothing. It doesn't for me, and my immunodeficiency will only show when they do Ig tests. I have no IgA and excess IgM, which means when they "average" them all in serum protein, they can make the hugely erroneous assumption that I'm fine, when I'm not. The lack of IgA means that I'm a sitting duck for anything respiratory.<br><br>
Thank goodness I've been allergic to all antibiotics for the last 26 years, otherwise I'd not have had to find better methods to work around this issue.<br><br>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~<br><br>
Soon to be mother of 4. People around here know that sometimes I sound gruff, but I'm not really. Much of what follows is my growly mother bear, which is biffing you around the ears. Know in advance that if I think someone's an airhead I say nothing. If I think someone's on the wrong track and its worth it, I will say something. Sometimes I say something which is wrongly interpretted. Please know that I'm not smacking you around the head. I'm so furious at a medical system that has been able to derail your head like this, and a lot of my anger is directed at them. But you happen to be the one in the way, between me and your paed. But if you took me with you at the next visit, I would have very little mercy on him. He would get a tongue lashing, and so would the hospital.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>soon2bemotherof4</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Sounds just like my son's pediatrician.<br>
My son was born August 11, 2005 prematurely (3 weeks) but weighing in at 8lb 2 oz. I had placenta prevea and it was an emergency c-section.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
My first son was three weeks premature at 8 lbs 1 oz. as most here know, and I had inverted nipples and was told I'd NEVER be able to feed <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/angry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="angry"><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">His lungs weren't fully mature and he was in NICU for the first 5 days.</td>
</tr></table></div>
On what basis did they say that? They tried to shove other garbage into my brain, but in those days no baby was considered to have immature lungs unless they were 6 weeks premature.... so I escaped that line.....
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">By the 7th day, they told me he was completely fine and ddin't need any oxygen or special medicine.</td>
</tr></table></div>
So..... if that's the case, what's the problem... says she reading on....
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">We went home and 3 days later, I took him to the ped for his first check-up. He weighed in at 8lb 8oz and the doc said he was fine. Next appointment was a month later and my son weighed 12lbs 10 oz and the doctor said he was doing great but this time the doc mentioned something about the rsv shot and all he really said was that he would advise for my son to get it since he was premature and in NICU after he was born.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Oh garbage. You know what? People who have short period cycles aka 25 days between period usually deliver 3 weeks early. That's normal for them. People who have 31 days cycles, often deliver at 42 weeks. So? I supposed they'll invent some "treatment protocol" for overcooked babies next.
He said he was going to talk to Margaret about whether it could be approved for my son. I have no idea who Margaret is and I never questioned anything more about it because I figured we'd discuss it more at my son's next appointment. The doc wanted my son to get vaccinated that day with the 2 month shots, but I said I'd bring my baby back at a later time for that. [/qute]IMO... you need to not only cancel that appointment but fire your paed. He sounds like an airhead.
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">He also told me I could use a teaspoon of cereal in the bottle for every ounce of breastmilk or formula because I said that my son spits up often from formula and the doc mentioned reflux.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Okay, you need to see a lactation expert fast....
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">My point was that he doesn't when I breastfeed.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Simple. Quit the formula as fast as you can... , throw away all bottles, deal to your diet and eliminate crap food, eat organics, drink only water and plenty of it, and add in omega 3's and EFA, and tell everyone who wants to give you advice, including me, <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"> to get knotted.<br><br>
Best thing you can do is sort out the breastfeeding. I'm in a rush and won't be able to check this post, but there's lots of people here who can help.<br><br>
By the way I ended up feeding my first for near on 2 years, and the second 4 and a half, inverted nipples and all.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Anyway, I planned on doing research about rsv and the synigris shot, but before I even got a chance to, the office called and told me they had the shot and for me to bring my son in. I've been putting it off for the last couple weeks now, but we're supposed to go in Monday at 1 pm. I'm still not sure about this shot.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Forget it, forget it forget it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/angry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="angry"> -> at your paediatrician. The guy is an ..........
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">My son has been doing great since we got out of the hospital. He is not in day care and in fact, I pretty much shelter him from everyone else except his own family.</td>
</tr></table></div>
So why fix what ain't broke????<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I have germ-x bottles in every room and I encourage my other sons wash their hands as often as possible.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Okay, I agree about handwashing, but I'd chuck out the germ-x bottles. Exactly why do you have them? Your baby's immune system needs to be used. He was fine when he left the hsopital so what's the problem? That's how his immune system learns what to do. If you shelter them too much, that is precisely why they go on to get asthma, allergies and other problems. Stick him in the front pack and start going for long walks in fresh air if there's any of that around. Don't bring him up in a sterile environment, though actually, there's a lot of germs in the air, and its not possible to do that. Handwashing is great, but all the rest of the skin on the body is also teeming as well. Usually we have a balance of the bacteria that we need on our skin. If our skin and our insides weren't full of bacteria we'd be dead.
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Their ages are 17, 14, and 12 so they understand how important it is to keep germs away.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Oh come now. Your home will never be germ free. That's impossible. And you wouldn't wan thta, because if you bring up kids germ free they end up getting very sick, becuase their immune systems don't know what to do, and when they meet something it goes "gahhhhhhhhhh"........ Everytime you touch your baby with a finger-tip, even if you've washed your hands, there will be 10 to the power 2 bacteria. The problem is, if you use antibacterials and all that other garbage, the bacteria that grows will gradually become the antibacterial resistent ones which will swamp out the good ones, and then you will really have problems on your hands.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The 17 year old is home all the time with us at the moment and the other two do go to middle school. So besides more than 3 people living under one roof, I don't think my son has the other risk factors for the rsv shot.</td>
</tr></table></div>
I think the only thing your son has a risk factor for, is that his mother is worried and listening to people wanting to capitalise unnecessarily on that worry.
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I need some advice please!</td>
</tr></table></div>
Right. Do yo have bach flowers handy?<br><br>
I'd get a bottle of rescue remedy, and have it by you at all times, and every time you start to think like this, put 6 drops under your tongue. If that doesn't settle you down after a few days, then a hefty whack on the frontal lobotomy of <b>your paediatrician</b> with a rolling pin might work. And don't stop until he doesn't get back up again.
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I haven't found many negative things about the rsv shot, but if my son really doesn't need the shot, I don't want to have to put him through it.</td>
</tr></table></div>
You've brought up the other children okay, and I bet you didn't have germ-x and all that other stuff for them...
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">He hasn't even sniffled yet and I'd hate to have to take him to the doctor's office every month and risk getting germs from there.<br>
Any advice would be appreciated!<br>
Thank-you!</td>
</tr></table></div>
What does your instinct say?????<br><br>
If it doesn't feel right, a mother should never do it.<br><br>
If it doesn't feel right, a mother should never do it.<br><br>
If it doesn't feel right, a mother should never do it.<br><br>
If it doesn't feel right, a mother should never do it.<br><br>
Did I just say this?<br><br>
If it doesn't feel right, a mother should never do it.<br><br>
Shall I say it again?<br><br>
If it doesn't feel right, a mother should never do it.<br><br>
The only person she is betraying is her baby. I know. I was stupid enough to do that, and I still regret the day.<br><br>
Frankly, if I was in your shoes, I'd run like hell.<br><br>
Your baby is fine right now. Quit the formula as gradually, but as quickly as possible, step up the breast milk, sort out your diet, and stay away from the person who could throw a total monkey wrench into all the good work you have done so far.<br><br>
There are all sorts of herbs for breastmilk, like milk thistle, but don't for get inositol. Your EFA's and omega 3's are crucial for good breast milk production... and drink lots of decent water. Not stuff with flouride, aluminium and other rubbish in it.<br><br>
Re inositol...<br><br>
This is a copy and paste of a post for me from an old thread no longer here.<br><br><br>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Most of the modern lactation textbooks don't mention it at all, which is disappointing, especailly as I thought Ruth Lawrences new one would have done. But she skips it out as well....but then IME most medical people these days, don't really understand the nutritional underpinning to lactation.<br><br>
I suppose its hard for them, when most of them can't get their head around day to day nutrition in a really meaningful way. So its no surprise that they don't know about inositol in lactation. Partly that may be because its part of the b-vitamin "life-cycle" and goes hand in hand with it.<br><br>
So maybe, to be nice to them, they just take it for granted.<br><br>
Inositol is an immune stimulant; is crucial to the formation of cellular membranes, and mediates cellular responses to external stimuli.<br><br>
Inositol has wide distribution in the body which indicates an important role, contrary to the contradictory statement you found saying it wasn't necessary. It is in its highest level in the heart and the brain.<br><br>
food sources are eggs,wheat germ, barley, whole wheat, cantaloupe, rock melon, grapefruit, molasses, roasted peanuts, Yeast (Torulopsis utilis) Brewer's years, beef, beef liver, beef heart (huge high levels...) Oranges Oats quite high... cabbage, carrots, peas (green) lettuce, spinach (monor source), baked beans, broccoli, tomatoes, brussel sprouts, kumara...<br><br>
Yes, its useful in depression, panic attacks, becaseu its a calmative vitamin and diabetes... because it goes hand in hand with the B's in the whole blood sugar deal.<br><br>
Oh, and its involved in the mobilisation of calcium as well, so that's important for both mum and baby...<br><br>
But the main roles in the body are not just, as you have said, to promote calmness in the brain and a sense of well being. It also helps us absorb nutrients from food, assists body to digest and move fat by manufacturing lecithin (and helping to prevent fat laying down in the liver, which causes gall stones), helps maintain good bone marrow, healthy hair eyes, and intestinal gut flora action. It helps maintain the health of the arteries liver kidneys and heart.<br><br>
Too little inositol will result in anxiety, insomnia, mental disorders, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, hair loss and constipation...<br><br>
So too little inositol won't produce the calmness and laid back mentality which is useful for breastfeeding...too little in the mother will also mean that the production of fat in the hind milk is inadequate, therefore even if you have enough "quantity" there will be insufficient fat there to help the baby grow at an optimum rate.<br><br>
So sometimes the issue isn't necessarily "quantity" of supply, but fat content of the hind milk. Or it could be that the mother's second let-down isn't working, because of tension, stress, psychodynamics etc. But in that case, the mother may also be inositol and B vitamin deficient, and therefore fat mobilisation may not be as good as it could be...<br><br>
IMO the main niological functions of inositol for the mother are as a nutrient and immunological stimulant, fat mobiliser into the milk, so that the hind milk is rich, but just as important, the emotional and mood "calming" nutrients, and particularly for a first time mother who may feel she has parent or IL stresses, and is fingers and thumbs, who needs all the calming nutrients she can get....<br><br>
The calming nutrients, particularly useful in postpartum depression are niacin (B-3) pyridoxine (B-6). cyanocobalamin (B-12) folic acid, inositol and choline. (Methionine and Betaine will come in here too...) Inositol as a mobilizer of lipids, reduces cholesterol levels and total lipids in the mum as well.... It also stimulates synthesis of biotin in the intestine of both mother and baby, which is why you need it as fibre, to keep up good gut flora...and the baby needs it as part of the package....<br><br>
The list above are all also crucial for good DNA mitosis (particularly folic acid), and cellular metabolism and good energy levels (ironically).<br><br>
All B's should be taken in the morning, and not after 11 a.m....<br><br>
But you should make sure that you take calcium and zinc in the evening, because inositol interferes with, and reduces absorption of these two...<br><br>
Put Vitamin C with Inositol, and you have what are referred to as the "sleep vitamins" because of their actions in promoting "restorative slumber" (pg 425 in Dr Pfeiffer's "mental and elemental nutrients") This is vital, not only to the mother, but to the baby.<br><br>
Oh, and its not necessary in the diet????<br><br>
Sometimes (but not always, obviously), scratchy babies are scratchy, because they don't get enough of the B's, inositol etc, and vitamin C. Like I say, that's not always a reason, but IME its one of the most common. I find that mothers who are up-tight do benefit from the above combination, along with help to get to the bottom of what it is that is upsetting them. And often that is the subtle behaviour of others leaving them feeling out of control, or feeling that others are doubting their ability. So B's and self-confidence go a long way to relaxing mothers, then the let-down works properly, and the hind-milk is got by the baby in full amounts.<br><br>
I wittered on earlier about how up-tight mothers sometimes don't have that second let down, that mobilises the hind milk, and they don't make good solid hind-milk either.....<br><br>
If you want to get technical about it, here is how I used to test the hind milk myself by using a spinner, and a butyrometer.<br><br>
I put in 10 mls of sulphuric acid into the butyrometer, added 10 mls of hind milk, 1 ml of amyl alcohol. Using a special rubber cork, which has a ball bearing in the bottom, and you stretch it down the neck of the butyrometer, with a special inserter, and when you take it out, the ball bearing locks the stopper on. Then you shake it up and down holding it in a tube thing that keeps it secure (Not in your hand, because it goes burning hot, ...and in your hand, you can break the butyrometer, as it has a thin stem and bulb at the bottom...) then spin it out using a centrifugal gerber-type spinner keeping the bulb end of the spinner toward the centre, as the fat will spin inwards. The milk solids are heavier so they spin to the outside of the "swing" (does this make any sense?) You need a revolution speed of 60 per minute..... for four minutes...<br><br>
A spinner is easily made as a single rotator with a handle. You just need a secure container for the butyrometer to fit in....Any lab buff could do this.... then you stand it, bulb up, cork down, in hot water for minimum of 60 seconds, before you hold it up to the light left hand on the body of the butyrometer, pushing up inside the stopper inserter with a metal tool that fits onto the ball bearing. This pushes the fat up the stem which has markings on it, and you read off the percentage on the long tail of the butyrometer. There should be with hind milk, about 30%+ fat in it (in fore and hind milk mixed, it usually tests out at about 5.6% but can vary depending on the quantity split between fore and hind)<br><br>
Oh, and human milk fat is transparent clear fat, not yellow....<br><br>
Fore milk on its own, is roughly about 1 - 2 % which explains why in hot weather when babies only want "water" they me de-latch once the hind milk comes through. If they are just thirst, they don't want the fat...<br><br>
But I haven't done this in a long time now. I don't have the equipment any more.<br><br>
If you know anyone who is a butter fat dairy herd tester, they could do it for you (That's how I figured out how to do it, as in my crazy single days, I was a dairy herd tester for two years, so I understood the principles of bovine lactation.<br><br>
And you know what?<br><br>
Human lactation isn't so very much different to cow's. Cows also have a double let down, and if you piss them off in the milking shed, they only give you foremilk, and hold back the hind milk. ....and make sure they lift their tails and give your hair a green grass conditioner as they leave...<br><br>
IMO mothers are just the same if they are interrupted or hassled when they are feeding a baby. There is IMO good reason to establish lactation in a first mother in quiet surroundings, and away from ne'er do gooders....<br><br>
Breastmilk in a mother with adequate nutrition has 0.3mgm inositol per ml (Pfeiffer), and has the same action on the baby, as it has on the mother, and is vital in the assisting of the baby to fully utilise the fats from the hind milk in its own body... and I think I said that before... :sigh...<br><br>
Interestingly Vitamin C and inositol are two of the main vitamin contents of semen......</td>
</tr></table></div>
someone asked what inositol was, and I replied
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">It's not a classified B vitamin, but works hand in hand with that group. A bit like folic acid isn't a numbered be, but also must go hand in hand with B6 and B 12..... It's sold as "inositol". Bronsons is one that sells it separately (500 mg), so I'd imagine others do too....<br><br>
You can buy it by itself, but I think it goes better with other supplements. I think anyone that is stressed and has supply problems should assume that they are "short". Whole foods theoretically should be enough. If you have plenty of them, but are still worried, I'd add in 500 mgs of inositol.<br><br>
If your access to good organic wholefood is limited, then I'd be looking at 1,000 mgs .<br><br>
this is a site that has a reasonable supplement profile for lactation, but I would be taking the higher limits, not the lower limits....:<br><br>
But I would not take the Flouride<br><br><a href="http://www.healthy.net/asp/templates/article.asp?PageType=article&ID=1256" target="_blank">http://www.healthy.net/asp/templates...rticle&ID=1256</a><br><br>
Nutrient Program for Lactation<br>
(Range — RDAs to Optimum)<br><br>
Calories* 2,600–3,500<br>
Fiber 15–30 g.<br>
Protein* 65–90 g.<br><br>
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br><br>
Vitamin A* 7,000–10,000 IUs<br>
Calcium* 1,200–1,600 mg.<br>
Beta-carotene 5,000–15,000 IUs<br>
Chloride+ 2–4 g.<br>
Vitamin D 400–600 IUs<br>
Chromium 200–400 mcg.<br>
Vitamin E* 60–400 IUs<br>
Copper 2–3 mg.<br>
Vitamin K 100–400 mcg.<br>
Fluoride+ 1.5–3.5 mg. = NO!<br>
Thiamine (B1) 1.6–25.0 mg.<br>
Iodine* 200–400 mcg. NO, take as kelp...<br>
Riboflavin (B2) 1.7–25.0 mg.<br>
Iron* 50–100 mg.<br>
Niacin (B3) 18–100 mg.<br>
Magnesium* 450–1,000 mg.<br>
Pantothenic acid (B5) 7–250 mg.<br>
Manganese 2.5–15 mg.<br>
Pyridoxine (B6) 2.5–100 mg.<br>
Molybdenum 150–500 mcg.<br>
Cobalamin (B12) 4–200 mcg.<br>
Phosphorus*+ 1,200–1,600 mg.<br>
Folic acid* 600–1,000 mcg.<br>
Potassium+ 2–5 g.<br>
Biotin 200–500 mcg.<br>
Selenium 150–300 mcg.<br>
Choline 100–250 mg.<br>
Sodium+ 2.5–4.0 g. = unnecessary...<br>
Inositol 100–250 mg. too low???<br>
Zinc* 25–40 mg.<br>
PABA 25–100 mg.<br>
Vitamin C* 100–2,000 mg. (too low for me....)<br>
Bioflavonoids 125–250 mg.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Get rid of that paediatrician, and find one that has some brains..
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top