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Does anyone know about cradleboards? My mom gave me a full size, hand-made Navajo cradleboard for christmas. (More as a collectable than anything else) I have seen several pics online of babies in them, but not with them actually being worn or carried. Do any of you have a link to a site that would have some info - or know of a good book on them. I have to say I am not really looking to wear it, but I would like to know more about it - how they are worn.
 

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I actually did a post on my blog about Anishnaabe babywearing w/ the help of a mama of that tribe.<br><br>
She mentioned to me that no one actually uses them INRL anymore because of how heavy they are, originally cradleboards werent used for constant babywearing back then either, but were used for LONG treks (family moving camp) or like if the women went berry picking (as 1 example), they would lean their cradleboards (w/ baby inside) up against a tree while they would go picking.<br>
For everyday babywearing they prefered a knotted shawl of some variety.<br><br>
But thats sooo nice you got a cradleboard! Some families still have ones they pass on through the generations..<br><br>
pictures! pictures!
 

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I had a friend who SWORE by hers. Said her son slept for 5 hours straight in it as a newborn.<br><br>
Her ex is Native American and it was a gift from his mother (the child's grandmother).<br><br>
I, too would love to see some pix.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>jul511riv</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10301880"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I had a friend who SWORE by hers. Said her son slept for 5 hours straight in it as a newborn.<br>
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I can see that. Similar to the swaddling effect. Right?<br>
Pics please!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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that's what she said.
 

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do a google search for "navajo cradleboard" you will come up with alot of info and pics. they are fascinating.
 

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double post
 

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the symbolism is beautiful (as most navajo crafts,etc).<br><br><a href="http://museum.utep.edu/educate/learninglinks/navajocradle.htm" target="_blank">http://museum.utep.edu/educate/learn...vajocradle.htm</a><br><br><a href="http://dmla.clan.lib.nv.us/DOCS/nsla/lpd/literacy/summer-reading/people/chap4b.htm" target="_blank">http://dmla.clan.lib.nv.us/DOCS/nsla...ple/chap4b.htm</a><br><br>
(from the last link)<br><br>
THE CRADLEBOARD<br>
Each tribe has their own cradleboard or baby carrier. Although some are very similar in construction and design, it is still possible to recognize those made by individual tribes.<br><br>
The Navajo name for the cradleboard is "Aweetsal". Many mothers still use this practical convenience, basically because it protects the baby from falls and keeps it secure, warm and comfortable.<br><br>
A cradleboard was made by using a piece of oak shaved thin so it could be bent into a bow attached to the top to protect the baby's head, and loops were attached along the sides of the carrier. The baby was laid in the carrier with a blanket wrapped around him and his hands at his side.<br><br>
A lacing strip of buckskin was then drawn through the side loops, fastening the infant securely. A buckskin or cloth was thrown over the top to shield the baby from the sun and to protect it from insects while it slept.<br><br>
The board could be stood against a wall or tree, carried in the arms or across the saddle when the mother rode horseback or in an improvised sling.<br><br>
The curved headboard is known as the rainbow, and when a child is laced into the cradleboard, it is said to be "under the rainbow".<br><br>
Today we see mothers everywhere carrying their infants in commercialized carriers that basically serve the same purpose as the Navajo cradleboard.<br><br><br><br>
also this link is an actual lesson about cradleboards from NAU (Northern AZ Univ)<br><a href="http://www4.nau.edu/ifwfd/ts_lessons/Cradleboards/cradleboard_geri/upload/lesson/index.pdf" target="_blank">http://www4.nau.edu/ifwfd/ts_lessons...sson/index.pdf</a>
 

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<a href="http://navajo-arts.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=64" target="_blank">http://navajo-arts.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=64</a><br><br><br><a href="http://navajo-arts.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=58" target="_blank">http://navajo-arts.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=58</a><br><br>
A few years back my ds went to the dentist and they had one that they actually used for kids who couldn't sit in the chair.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
here is a link to a couple pics. <a href="http://mystiles.blogspot.com/" target="_blank">http://mystiles.blogspot.com/</a><br><br>
Thanks for all the info!
 
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