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Okay, I've been craving Indian foods. I've never made any (that I know of) and don't have a clue as to where to start. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/nut.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="nut"><br><br>
Would love any easy/beginner recipes or links to recipes. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Thank you!!!
 

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I don't really have recipes, but we love namaste.com. They enable us to eat Indian food here in rural kansas. If you focus on the spices, you can get stuff really cheap. If you're willing to pay the shipping, they also have cans of baigan bartha, mung dahl, etc. mmmmm . . . . .
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/notes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="notes">:<br><br>
A few months ago I went to the local Indian grocery and got a whole bunch of spices, packaged sauce mixes, some ghee, etc. But every attempt I've made to make Indian food has been a bit of a flop nonetheless. So I'd love some TNT recipes, too!<br><br>
~Nick
 

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This book <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fexec%2Fobidos%2Ftg%2Fdetail%2F-%2F1862044805%2Fqid%3D1129135499%2Fsr%3D1-2%2Fref%3Dsr_1_2%2F104-0054788-3542356%3Fv%3Dglance%26s%3Dbooks" target="_blank">Indian Vegetarian Cooking</a> is my favorite for easy simple recipes. Has clear explanatins and beatuiful pictures.
 

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I love Indian food and I made it for dinner just a few nights ago. I don't really use any recipes just make them up as I go. I go to the Indian grocery store pretty regularly to make sure I have certain tings on hand. I have also learned a lot from MIL.<br><a href="http://www.food-india.com/" target="_blank">http://www.food-india.com/</a><br><a href="http://www.tarladalal.com/" target="_blank">http://www.tarladalal.com/</a><br><a href="http://www.samachar.com/food/index.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.samachar.com/food/index.shtml</a><br><br>
Good Luck!
 

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if you're near a trader joe's at all, they have some yummy indian stuff!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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Well, this is not really a recipe, but it is good for cravings when you can't go to the restaurant or don't have time to cook.<br><br>
Sometimes I just buy a jar of prepared Indian Korma sauce, and heat it up and throw it on some cooked frozen veggies like peas, green beans, cauliflower. Not particularly gourmet but it does the trick.<br><br>
Plain yogurt with mild curry powder and salt, with some chopped onions, tomatoes and cucumber if you like is good as a dip for fresh veggies.
 

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I'm not sure this is totally authentic, but it has a good Indian flavor, and satisfies the urge when we can't get to the local Indian restaurant:<br><br>
Dal:<br><br>
Cook lentils (red, brown, or mix)<br><br>
While lentils are cooking, saute some onions in a skillet with some olive oil. Add garlic and black mustard seeds.<br><br>
Add various Indian spices. I usually add curry powder, cumin, cinnamon, and sometimes ginger, as well as salt and pepper. Add one can or equivalent of tomato sauce, and stir.<br><br>
Add drained lentils.<br><br>
Serve with a dollop of yogurt, or hot sauce, or whatever. Dh likes it best with bread. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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This is a great beginner's recipe since it uses fairly easy-to-get spices. It is adapted from Madhur Jaffrey's World of the East Vegetarian Cooking (which is a good beginner's book on Asian cookery). Once you get more advanced, then I highly recommend Julie Sahni's cookbooks on the subject.<br><br><b>Potato/Tomato/Coconut Curry</b><br><br>
Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method<br>
-------- ------------ --------------------------------<br>
2 tablespoons oil<br>
8 cloves garlic -- crushed<br>
1/2 teaspoon hot pepper flakes<br>
2 teaspoons cumin seeds -- roasted<br><br>
1 cup coconut (unsweetened) -- grated<br><br>
3 medium russet potatoes -- 3/8" Cubes<br>
20 ounces tomatoes -- 1/2" Diced<br>
3/4 teaspoon turmeric<br>
2 teaspoons cumin -- freshly ground<br>
1/2 teaspoon coriander -- freshly ground<br>
1/2 teaspoon fennel -- freshly ground<br>
1/8 teaspoon asafoetida -- optional<br>
1 1/2 cups water or veggie broth<br><br>
2 teaspoons sugar -- unrefined<br>
1 1/2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar<br>
1 teaspoon salt<br><br>
Cut the potatoes into 3/8" cubes and set aside.<br><br>
Heat the oil in a pot over a medium flame. When hot, put in the minced garlic, red pepper and the cumin seeds. Stir for 10-15 seconds. The garlic should brown lightly, the red pepper should darken, and the cumin seeds should sizzle. Put in the grated coconut and stir for approximately 20 seconds.<br><br>
Add in the potatoes, tomatoes (including any juice), and the remaining ingredients except the sugar, salt, and vinegar and bring to a boil.<br><br>
Cover and simmer for about 30 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. Stir gently every 10 minutes or so to prevent sticking. Once cooked add in the salt, sugar and vinegar. Stir again and cook for 1 minute more.<br><br>
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -<br><br>
Per serving (excluding unknown items): 274 Calories; 8g Fat (24% calories from fat); 6g Protein; 49g Carbohydrate; 0mg Cholesterol; 560mg Sodium
 

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In general, I think if you have trouble making food that tastes right, it's likely because you are not using enough spices. Also, dh and I have noticed that in restaurants Indian food is usually heavy on salt. Mmm . . .
 

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One recipe I love is the recipe for aloo gobi that is a special feature on the Bend It Like Beckam DVD (also a very good movie!).<br><br>
DH and I took an Indian cooking class through a local community college a few years back. Here are a few of the recipes they gave us:<br><br>
Bharta (my favorite)<br>
Serves 6<br>
Prep time: 1 hour<br><br>
2 eggplants<br>
4 tablespoons oil<br>
2 C chopped onions<br>
2 C chopped tomatoes<br>
2t chopped jalapeno<br>
1 1/2 t salt<br>
1 1/2 t tumeric<br>
1/2 t cayenne<br>
1/2 t garam masala<br>
Cilantro, to garnish<br><br>
Pierce eggplant with a fork in a few places. Put eggplant in an oven preheated to 500 degrees F for 30 minutes. Remove and let cool. Heat oil in a skillet on medium-high heat, add the onions and cook until browned. Add the tomatoes and the jalapeno and cook until water from tomatoes is dried. While this is cooking, peel the eggplant and separate into small pieces. Add eggplant to the onion and tomato masala along with tumeric and cayenne and cook for 15 minutes, uncovered. Add the garam masala. Garlish with cilantro.<br><br>
Paneer Masala<br>
Prep time: 30 minutes<br>
Serves 6-8<br><br>
2 C chopped onion<br>
4 T oil<br>
1 C Tomato sauce<br>
1 t salt<br>
1 t tumeric<br>
1/2 t cayenne<br>
Approx. 3 C paneer (you can make your own, but it never turns out for me. I buy it at an Indian grocer)<br><br>
Blend onions in a blender with 1/2 c water. Heat skillet on medium to medium-high heat and add oil. Then, add the blended onions. Cook until ight brown. Add the tomato sauce and 1 cup of water. Add the salt, tumeric, and cayenne as wel. Continue to cook on medium heat for about 5 minutes, then add the paneer. Cook covered for another 5 mintes on medium-low heat.<br><br>
Paneer (if you want to try it)<br>
Makes 3 cups<br>
Prep time: approximately 40 minutes<br><br>
1 gallon 2% milk<br>
2 oz vinegar or lemon juice<br><br>
Heat milk on medium-high heat until it comes to a boil. Pour vinegar slowly and gently, stir a few times. Curd should have separated from the clear liquid. Pour into a collander lined with a fine cheesecloth. Drain and hang until the water comes to a drop. Then prss the curd still in the cheesecloth between two flat surfaces with a weight on top for 15 to 20 mintes. Cut into pieces.<br><br>
Mung Bean Dal<br>
Serves 6<br>
Prep time: 1 hour<br><br>
1 C mung bean dal<br>
1 T crushed garlic<br>
1T crushed ginger<br>
1 T oil<br>
1 C chopped onion<br>
1 1/2 t salt<br>
1 1/2 t tumeric<br>
1/2 t cayenne<br>
1 t garam masala<br>
cilantro to garnish<br><br>
Sorth through dal for any stones or debris and wash thoroughly. In a 2 quart pan add 9 cups water and the dal. Bring to a boil on medium high heat. WHen teh dal splits add the garlic, ginger, salt, tumeric, and cayenne. Heat th eoil in a small saute pan and add the chopped onions. Cook until brown. Add this to dal when the dal is cooked all the way through. Add garam masala and garlish with chopped cilantro.<br><br>
Garam Masala<br>
Yields: 12 oz<br>
Prep time: 20 minutes<br><br>
1/2 C coriander seed<br>
1/2 C cumin seed<br>
1 T cloves<br>
1 T whole black pepper<br>
1T cinnamon sticks<br><br>
Heat oven to 200 degrees F. Mix the spices and place in oven for approximately 15 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. Grind spices in clean coffee grinder and store in a jar and use as needed.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>richella</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">In general, I think if you have trouble making food that tastes right, it's likely because you are not using enough spices. Also, dh and I have noticed that in restaurants Indian food is usually heavy on salt. Mmm . . .</div>
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Nope, I'm using plenty of spices, trust me. And even the mixes that I got at the Indian grocery -- which ought to be foolproof, right? Just follow the instructions -- are turning out yucky. Only having this prob with Indian food, too -- the Thai and Chinese and Tex-Mex and Italian and everything else I make turns out scrumptious. Could just be that I'm having a weird pregnancy-induced aversion, maybe... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"><br><br>
Toraji and Dahlia, thanks for posting your recipes! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br><br>
~nick
 

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VikingKvinna, one thing my mil taught me was to cook the spices in the oil before adding ingredients. For instance, when the mustard seed will pop, then I know the spices have been heated enough to bring out the flavors. Otherwise, the spices should become brown, but not burnt. Usually, then add the onion to the spices before any other ingredients. It should be soft before adding more. This was on thing that really change how the food tasted for the better. I do not know if you already do this, but it is one thought.<br>
I had problems eating some of the cuuries dh made while I was preg with dd. Garam Masala flavoring appealed to me, but I could not stand some of his variation on your basic yellow curry. After dd was born, everything tasted sooo good, and I am back to loving it.<br><br>
Just a funny note about the Bend it like Beckham, my fil makes taught us to make chapatis because that is one of his cooking specialties. He was so much like the mother in the movie because he would not allow us to cook our chapitis if they were not round. He would roll it back into a ball and complete it for us. I never got to cook a chapati with him. I did watch though and I have to say my wonky, wiggly chapatis still taste good.
 

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I seriously doubt this is really authentic, but it works for me when I'm dying for curry. Excuse the crazy directions. It's one of those things I make from memory.<br><br>
Chicken Lentil Curry<br>
bag of lentils slightly undercooked according to package instructions<br>
can of diced tomatoes or fresh if it's summer<br>
cubed chicken breast (can be made without)<br>
a bunch of your favorite curry powder<br><br>
Heat olive oil in a pan on the stove. Add curry. Add chicken breast cubes and cook through. Add lentils and tomatoes (and more curry if necessary). Yummy!
 

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This is not authentic at all!!! But it is the closest I have ever come to anything that tastes decent! Trader Joe's has a short little jar of Indian Relish. I take 2 cups of brown basmati rice and cook it in the rice cooker. Then I add a large can of chickpeas, a can of diced tomatoes, garlic and onions and the jar of relish. WOW, it is so easy and actually tastes great! (Pretty healthy too!!) You can also buy the premade garlic naan (bread) in the Trader Joe's frozen section. You could do this in a slow cooker or stovetop if you don't have a rice cooker.
 

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Our first Indian cookbook was Indian Cooking by Madhur Jaffrey. She explains all the methods, spices, etc. and it's filled with lots of yummy recipes. We use recipes from it at least once a week. I definitely recommend it.<br><br>
And I agree with a pp who said to visit an Indian/Pakistani market for really inexpensive bulk spices and lentils.<br><br>
ETA to add a link: <a href="http://www.recipezaar.com/r/110/80" target="_blank">http://www.recipezaar.com/r/110/80</a><br><br>
There a bunch of Indian recipes here.
 
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