Mothering Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,499 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<p>For the elementary teachers/classrooms that use workplans, how are the work plans developed?  Do teachers "group" kids, giving several the same or similar plan, or are they individualized for each of the students in the classroom? </p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,487 Posts
My 7 yo makes his work plans each week with his teacher's help. So, it's definitely individual; his isn't the same as any other student's, yk? Basically, the teacher guides him, and makes sure several areas are represented, and checks in during the week to see what he's accomplished. Some things he does work on with others, so they would have the same item on their work plan - say, researching the seasons in the southern hemisphere.<br>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,499 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
<p>Thanks for that information.  That's pretty much what I thought.  Yet another disappointment in my ds's "Montessori" school.  One of the teachers was saying that they group kids by ability (but the "groups" are fluid, they like to point out) and in terms of what the curriculum (it's public school, so they "know what kids are supposed to learn by the end of each year") dictates they be working on through the year, in order to create the work plans.  "Otherwise, I'd be making 24 individual workplans every week!" she defended.  Isn't that part of what Montessori is about - individuality?  Somehow, I was feeling like if it's done "right" then that shouldn't be as big of an ordeal as she made it sound.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
<p>At the school I attended the teacher filled out our work plans and left them on our desks.  She then would meet briefly with each of us and clarify or make any changes needed.   The plans varied a lot between children.  More independent students would have very general items (practice dynamic addition).  Less independent students would have more specific items (10 dynamic addition problems using the large bead frame).  </p>
<p> </p>
<p>On a very practical basis its hard to give several children the same plan because there is only one (maybe two) of each material.  If she has "addition stamp game" on several work plans aren't the kids spending a lot of time waiting for the materials?</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
<p>My kids are still in primary, but there is still a specific sequence to items.  DD has to master X before she can start on Y, and she understands this...it actually keeps her motivated more, since she has goals.  She so wants to work on the "fetch" (dynamic 4-digit addition), but she knows that she has to master the 45 layout first, which she dislikes.  But, because she wants to work on what the other kindy are working on, she is more diligent to strive to learn the layout well.  Similar to other subjects...if she is neglecting writing, the teacher will offer work in those areas to balance her academic development.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I just wonder if she will lose this when she is in kindy and the oldest in the class...what will she strive for.  Its still a TON better than the alternative public kindy, so we will deal with it when we are there.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>As for the E1 class, the children develop a workplan at the beginning of the week and they know that they need to do X amount of work (eg finish 3 math assignments, finish 3 reading assignments, 2 writing assignments and so forth).  However they accomplish this throughout the week is up to them.  The teacher merely keeps an eye on them to see if they are managing their time.  For those that do well at this, there is little management, and for those that do not manage well, there is more teacher assistance in guiding them on the creation of the plan, as well as watching them throughout the week to ensure all will be accomplished.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,706 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>nanette0269</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1282448/creating-work-plans#post_16092710"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>My kids are still in primary, but there is still a specific sequence to items.  DD has to master X before she can start on Y, and she understands this...it actually keeps her motivated more, since she has goals.  She so wants to work on the "fetch" (dynamic 4-digit addition), but she knows that she has to master the 45 layout first, which she dislikes.  But, because she wants to work on what the other kindy are working on, she is more diligent to strive to learn the layout well.  Similar to other subjects...if she is neglecting writing, the teacher will offer work in those areas to balance her academic development.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I just wonder if she will lose this when she is in kindy and the oldest in the class...what will she strive for.  Its still a TON better than the alternative public kindy, so we will deal with it when we are there.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>As for the E1 class, the children develop a workplan at the beginning of the week and they know that they need to do X amount of work (eg finish 3 math assignments, finish 3 reading assignments, 2 writing assignments and so forth).  However they accomplish this throughout the week is up to them.  The teacher merely keeps an eye on them to see if they are managing their time.  For those that do well at this, there is little management, and for those that do not manage well, there is more teacher assistance in guiding them on the creation of the plan, as well as watching them throughout the week to ensure all will be accomplished.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p>This sounds exactly like our school. They get a new <strong>blank</strong> workplan every Monday that simply says:  Math, Practical Life, Language, Sensorial, Reading, etc.  Each child knows where they are in the sequence of materials and work accordingly.  I have seen the teacher giving both individual and group lessons since I'm sure she is aware of where each child is (there are some that are at the same level, so it makes sense to group them together to save some time).  For the most part, all the children work independently at their own level.  When a job has been completed, one of the teachers in the classroom will write down what job the child did and initial it.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>So, even though they all start with the same blank workplan, they go about their day picking jobs according to their own ability.  Some kids get two jobs done (like my 1st grader).  Some kids get every job done (like my kindergartener).<br>
 </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
<p>Our children do a daily agenda first thing when they arrive at school. They select four or five different items to put on their list (math, puzzle map, language etc.) and the teacher looks at it and might accept it as is, might make some suggestions (eg. You haven't done Math in a few days so let's add that in) or might ask for some specifics about what kind of language or math work the child is choosing. The children will also have other group activities interspersed through the day (music or French). I believe French and Art are done in small groups but some other areas (Music or gym) is done with the whole class together.</p>
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top