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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm reading Making Peace With Autism, and she talks time to time about crisis storybooks as a way to help your ASD child cope with upcoming events like vacations, big family get togethers, doctor's visits, and the like. I think they're called "social stories" by some folks.

Anyway, I'm going to attempt to make one for our upcoming beach trip (5 weeks and counting), hoping that it will help ds with sleeping and eating and fewer meltdowns, etc..

Have any of y'all ever done this? If so, did it help?

BTW, I am loving Susan Senator, she is wonderful and honest. Link to her blog, if anyone is interested:

http://susansenator.com/artautism.html
 

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Man I wish I would have seen this a few weeks ago... We are in the middle of a lot of changes and Ryan is not hadling them so well but I think this may have helped him...
We are moving in with my parents while my husband is away on training with the military and he is not liking all the changes... I think I might try tonight to sit down and make a book about daddy being gone... I need to get a copy of this book...
 

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That sounds like a great idea for kids who don't cope with transition well..any kid, yk? Eli seems to cope OK with transition for an asd kid, so far. But we are coming up on a possible move, and my mother is dying (we have very little relationship so Eli doesn't even know her0 and we'll have to visit her shortly..I may try this, as well. Thanks!
 

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Hey Finch

I thought about doing something like this. My son is really into Clifford- I thought about making a book that shows Clifford going to school--I anticipate that will be an extremely stressful situation- as it is daycare drop off is a nightmare- I practically have to peel him off the sidewalk. My thought was to take some digital pictures of his new school (starts 9/8!) and put them in this book with Clifford narrating--very similar to what Senator describes as a crisis story. I've had this idea for a little while, but wasn't quite sure how/where to start- the link you gave is perfect- I think I'll try it and let you all know how it goes!

K
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by eandasmom
Hey Finch

I thought about doing something like this. My son is really into Clifford- I thought about making a book that shows Clifford going to school--I anticipate that will be an extremely stressful situation- as it is daycare drop off is a nightmare- I practically have to peel him off the sidewalk. My thought was to take some digital pictures of his new school (starts 9/8!) and put them in this book with Clifford narrating--very similar to what Senator describes as a crisis story. I've had this idea for a little while, but wasn't quite sure how/where to start- the link you gave is perfect- I think I'll try it and let you all know how it goes!

K
Good idea as long as you have a kid who can look at clifford and then relate all that info. to themselves -- that wouldn't have been my kid when she was younger and not always now either.

The best social stories need real pictures of real people and places. I cannot begin to tell you the amount of social stories dd has from over the years.

You take several pictures of dc and then you either find some actual photographs online of beaches and such or if they have a website you get them from there. You cut your kid out and laminate it and velcro or glue him in the pictures. It is ideal for you to take pictures of where he'll sleep and where he'll eat, etc. , but if it's far away you'll have to do the best you can. The important part is to get them into the pictures and yourself and other family members too. Take a picture of your car with your dc in it and have that be the start of the story---stuff like that. Make it simple in the way that there are not way too many pages, but at the same time detailed to where they can be reassured about you all being together and where you will sleep, eat, etc. Also, show the car coming home too.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Oh, I forgot--- DD also has a social story book (but the pages can also come out and be put on the fridge for a reminder) about emotions and it shows dd making a sad face (she liked acting things out for the pics) then it shows her doing something she can do when she's mad, etc. You can also just make this out of regular faces from clip art if your kid isn't able to act it out for you to take pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by judejude
The best social stories need real pictures of real people and places....... but at the same time detailed to where they can be reassured about you all being together and where you will sleep, eat, etc. Also, show the car coming home too.

Just my 2 cents.
This is what I was planning to do. I think the point of the crisis storybook is for the child to actually see themselves and the people and places where they will be going. I plan on using pictures of all the relatives who will be at the beach, and actual pictures of the beach house and inside the beach house as well. I also plan on taking pictures of the bed where he will be sleeping (aerobed twin size on the floor) and stuff like that. Good idea about the car coming home, hadn't thought of that.
 

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Hey Finch,

we did something similar I think, under the advice of a therapist we were seeing when my daughter had HORRIBLE bathtub phobia (shaking, turning blue, HYSTERICAL). We wrote a story about a little girl with a name very similar to hers. We told the story of how she used to enjoy baths and then about the scarey thing that happened that led to the phobia, then how she tried it again, little by little and had fun with it again. It worked for us, (along with gradually desensitizing her). I used it successfully since then as well. its fun!

julie
 

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UGH, we just got back from vacation and I did TONS AND TONS to prepare Mr. ASD and nothing short of changing his neurology would have worked this time.

We went to disney and thank goodness we took 2 days there and got the special needs pass because it took the first 1/2 day just for him to get the routine and start to be somewhat pleasant as long as we had the "fast pass". I still spent much time outside rides he hadn't been on because they were new and scary and he wouldn't go on.

I am just plain ole pooped afterward. Fun family vacations just aren't as fun.

It would have been great if there was some sort of pictures or animated things that could show what the rides were like but there was very little info like that. I looked everywhere for something like that. If he didn't know what it was like and he thought it was scary at all, he wasn't getting on. I was queen of the hold everything by the exit mom with anxiety boy, while everyone else rode.

Renee
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by rbear4
UGH, we just got back from vacation and I did TONS AND TONS to prepare Mr. ASD and nothing short of changing his neurology would have worked this time.

We went to disney and thank goodness we took 2 days there and got the special needs pass because it took the first 1/2 day just for him to get the routine and start to be somewhat pleasant as long as we had the "fast pass". I still spent much time outside rides he hadn't been on because they were new and scary and he wouldn't go on.

I am just plain ole pooped afterward. Fun family vacations just aren't as fun.

It would have been great if there was some sort of pictures or animated things that could show what the rides were like but there was very little info like that. I looked everywhere for something like that. If he didn't know what it was like and he thought it was scary at all, he wasn't getting on. I was queen of the hold everything by the exit mom with anxiety boy, while everyone else rode.

Renee
Hey, are you sure you didn't have my kid?
DD wants to go to Disney Land/World and she also wants to go to a nearby amusement park. If we go we will go with the expectation she will not do anything but walk around and then she will be happy to say that she went.
She has never been on a ride in her life (she's 10).

I'm waiting for the day when she will go on the carousel. She might have gone already if they didn't have that blasted loud music. Oh well.

The key for me is to keep low expectations
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Jewelie
Hey Finch,

we did something similar I think, under the advice of a therapist we were seeing when my daughter had HORRIBLE bathtub phobia (shaking, turning blue, HYSTERICAL). We wrote a story about a little girl with a name very similar to hers. We told the story of how she used to enjoy baths and then about the scarey thing that happened that led to the phobia, then how she tried it again, little by little and had fun with it again. It worked for us, (along with gradually desensitizing her). I used it successfully since then as well. its fun!

julie
Geez, I wish that would have worked for us, but dd wouldn't get near water even as a baby. Her hands were dirty once when my mom was over and my mom went to stick her hands under the kitchen sink (dd was about 1) and I had to run like a maniac and try not to yell too loud and intercept her from doing it. The water was already on but I got there just in time. DD would have been screaming like a crazy baby.

DD didn't take a bath until she was 3 and that only lasted a short time and then she regressed and then she went without a bath for almost a year after that. Thank goodness she is finally better about it. Just in time for puberty and the stinky arm pits
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
We went through the bath horror phase too, after ds accidentally fell off his bath seat and into the water and 1/2 his face got wet.
It took months of him standing up in the tub screaming, refusing to sit down, refusing to get in the tub unless I got in with him, and 30 second wash-downs before he finally would sit down. Guess how we got him to sit in the tub again....we put little toy bath cars in the tub, filled it with water about 2 inches so he'd HAVE to sit down to reach the cars, and put him in. He was super pissed about us not handing the cars to him (cars are a favorite stim/perseveration for him), but it worked...he sat in the water to play with the cars and we breathed a sigh of relief.
:

I wish I'd done that trick sooner....lol.

I don't DARE venture somewhere like disney...omg, it would be a total waste of money and time.
 
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