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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. I need the advice of all you smart frugal mamas.

DH and I have the average suburban lifestyle with 2 LO, a small (yet frighteningly expensive) 2-bed house, a car and a high-pressure career. It sounds nice from the outside but it's killing us.

We desperately want a MUCH more relaxed lifestyle in a rural setting where we can grow our own food, have LOTS more kids and, more importantly, DH can work part-time so he can be a more active part of the children's lives. But in order to do that I need to bring in the difference between DH's current wage and his new part-time wage, all whilst being a SAHM!

So here's the question. What would be a good idea for a home business?
I thought about making and selling quilts but I'm not sure that people would buy such luxuries in the current economic climate.

All suggestions gratefully recieved...
 

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I don't know about specifically crunchy careers, but in general, I think it's good to look at what you do or did professionally, and try to think if there is a need or a void in your field that you could fill.

You might find that there is a job that no one in an office WANTS to do, but you don't mind doing it from home if it allows you the freedom to stay home/work less hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was in the Air Force from when I left school til I got pregnant with DS so I'm not sure how to translate that to home working.

But the office work from home is a great idea I hadn't thought of before... perhaps I could even do a job-share with DH.

Thanks
 

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THere isn't a reason you can't do multiple side jobs other than the uneven income. You could make quilts and teach quilting classes. You could do alterations, teach sewing, sell your own quilt (or other) patterns.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by geiamama View Post
I was in the Air Force from when I left school til I got pregnant with DS so I'm not sure how to translate that to home working.

But the office work from home is a great idea I hadn't thought of before... perhaps I could even do a job-share with DH.

Thanks
If you don't mind me asking, what did you do in the Air Force? Sometimes those jobs can can trasnfer in unexpected ways if you are creative.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by SeekingJoy View Post
THere isn't a reason you can't do multiple side jobs other than the uneven income. You could make quilts and teach quilting classes. You could do alterations, teach sewing, sell your own quilt (or other) patterns.
ITA w/this. While selling quilts might work, I think there are a lot of folks like myself who would love to learn how to do this. Heck, just today I was wishing there was a person who could teach me how to garden. In the past, I have hired folks for my lawn needs but I can't afford that anymore. Yet despite reading a ton of books on gardening, I was thinking how great it would be if there was someone who could come to my house and actually get in the dirt with me and give me tips and advice. Maybe you could do something like that...
 

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Just adding that I, too, agree about teaching instead of doing. I have some co-workers that actually said they would pay me to give a soap-making class. Of course I won't charge them because they are friends, but if you can do a few different homemaking skills that people have not learned from their parents, then that would be a good possibility. You could become the new home skills maven in your area.
 

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I just wanted to counter the idea that home-grown food is relaxing. I enjoy growing food, but it's hard work. I can afford to buy my own food if something were to go wrong in my garden, so it's not stressful, it's a choice. Growing would become stressful if you were relying heavily on your own garden for food.

Start planning long-term. First step: grow a small vegetable garden - even if it's tomatoes in containers - this year to make sure you enjoy that sort of work. There's often a 'grass is always greener' between urban and rural lifestyles. It can be fulfilling work, but it is work.

Crafts don't often sell well. Anyone who really loves crafts would rather make their own than pay someone else to do it. Again, teaching would be better.

Aven
 

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Could you make smalled quilt inspired items. A whole quilt can be a significant amount of money and decorating space but pillow covers, toys or bags would be more affordable and versitile for the customer and still allow them to show off their local artisian crunchy green appreciation.

My sister makes jewelry and is doing pretty good in this economy. Her look is very contemporary and she uses a lot of recycled materials. She's also willing to spend a couple of weekends a month at craft fairs. There is a whole new generation of crafters that are a whole lot edgier that your momma's craft fair.
 

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What about using your quilting skills to make small multiples, assembly line style? Finger puppets and stuffed animals come to mind at the moment...
Check out etsy.com and market yourself like crazy.
Create your own "brand," maybe test the waters in niche markets like vegan, organic, etc.
In addition to craft fairs, you might do well at a farmer's market. Or a boutique?
It's easier to make money teaching classes in a highly populated area. If you do move to the country, try to schedule classes in the closest city.
You can also offer to do home crafting parties- think Tupperware meets Martha Stewart!
Let us know how it goes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by avendesora View Post
I just wanted to counter the idea that home-grown food is relaxing.
:

Thank you for the concern and I completely agree. I'm lucky in that I grew up growing food with my parents and helping my grandfather on his farm so whilst it's incredibly hard work, it just feels like home to me. I'm not sure DH really gets it though. He's a real city boy and I'm half convinced he thinks the food will grow with the celophane attached!


Quote:

Originally Posted by AngeliqueW View Post
Create your own "brand," maybe test the waters in niche markets like vegan, organic, etc.
I hadn't thought of that. I wanted to create an ethical business with organic products because it lived up to my moral views. It didn't dawn on me that it might be a selling point. Duh!


Quote:

Originally Posted by AngeliqueW View Post
You can also offer to do home crafting parties- think Tupperware meets Martha Stewart!
Ooh I shall get my fifties floral apron ready...
:

I think DH may have got the wrong end of the stick when I told him this idea and he now has a mental image of me as Martha Stewert at an Ann Summers party!!!
 
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