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Discussion Starter #1
hi mamas,<br><br>
I dabble in sewing but I'm totally a beginner. I've done a waldorf doll, a ton of eye spy pillows, and a few capes. that's about the extent of things.<br><br>
I'm trying to find a quilt for our bed and can't find ANYTHING that I like. It has to be affordable and thin (must fit in washer) as DH has severe allergies to dust mites. I prefer 100% cotton.<br><br>
Our walls are olive green and the curtains are a dark green as well. I think more green would just be ludicrous. That said, a random solid color doesn't seem to "tie in" with the rest of the room.<br><br>
I found this quilt on Etsy which I totally love, but I don't have $500 to spend on something like that.<br><a href="http://www.etsy.com/listing/38298445/organic-king-size-quilt-tree-branch" target="_blank">http://www.etsy.com/listing/38298445...lt-tree-branch</a><br><br>
Has anyone done a project like this? Could I get a chocolate brown quilt, and then add my own tree? If so, how would you do it? Is it beyond my skill level?<br><br>
I'm assuming you would satin stitch around each applique piece?? Is that correct? Does it need some sort of backing? Would it hold up to repeat washing?<br><br>
Everything else with this sort of design that I've found commerically available is a duvet cover. I want a quilt.<br><br>
Any ideas?<br>
XOXO<br>
B
 

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you could do that. i wouldn't "get a brown quilt" and applique on it; i would get the brown fabric, do the applique, then make a quilt sandwich (top/batting/backing) and quilt or tie.<br>
you could use wonder under fusible web to fuse the applique in place before sewing; this would make things much easier, imo.<br><br>
actually, now that i am thinking about it, i guess you could use the wonder under to do the applique on an already finished blanket, but you would have to do the stitching by hand. i just don't think it would be a great idea to attatch the applique OVER quilting, iykwim.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ms. shell,<br><br>
thanks for the feedback. exactly the kind of thoughts I need since I'm inexperienced in this area.<br><br>
Is the reason I can't applique onto a quilt because I won't be able to fit the quilt through the machine?<br><br>
How does the etsy artist sew the swirls on after the applique is done? Does she have a special sewing machine that can take big pieces of fabric?<br><br>
I like the idea of having a thin quilt that's heavy feeling (like the ones they sell at target etc). They are solid color but have a lot of texture to them (like a small pattern that looks like little squares, or one that even had a chrysanthemum stitch). Is it problematic to put an applique on a textured surface like that? Sounds like it might be from your post.<br><br>
I think my concern is that if I try to make a quilt myself, it will feel kind of slippy/double layers that shift. I want a tight together one (not something that feels like a sack thats been tacked in a few places in the middle).<br><br>
Also, how strong is the fusible web. Does it hold pretty well on its own and the hand stitching is just a safeguard, or is it a necessity or it will peel off?<br><br>
XOXO<br>
B
 

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If you've found a duvet cover that you like could you turn it into a quilt. Post the batting inside, sew up the bottom and then do the quilting.<br><br>
I've never tried it but it seems to me it might be easier than such a big appliqué. Though that may well be a reflection of my experiences with appliqué, which are never as neat as I want them to be.
 

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Hi, Beth- i just happened to see this: <a href="http://www.homesew.com/r245.html" target="_blank">http://www.homesew.com/r245.html</a><br>
and thought of you and this project; it might be perfect for what you are wanting to do....
 

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I recommend using fusible web and then stitching around. You don't get wrinkled appliques and stuff that way. You can either do satin stitch or zig-zag, which would allow the edges to fray, which sometimes makes a nice effect. Make sure your machine can handle satin stitch, though. My machine rebels whenever I try it.<br><br>
Yes, the swirls, for a quilt that large, would have to be done on a special sewing machine that you can either buy for a few thousand dollars, or rent for like $100 and hour LOL. You can either do it by hand and not make it as intricate (unless you have several years to finish the quilt <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">) or tie it as a PP suggested. If I remember correctly, a lap quilt is about as big as you can do with a standard sewing machine, and even then it's a pain.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
hey guys,<br><br>
thanks for the advice. my mom is more experienced with sewing and is staying with me for a few weeks to help watch my son while I work. so she's also helping me figure this out.<br><br>
I found a quilt I like thats fairly thin (as far as quilts go). its got a nice swirly pattern on it. We are going to try laying the pieces out and attaching with fusible web and then sewing around the edges (either by hand or by machine if its possible....).<br><br>
Its probably not the ideal way, but the quilt was a bargain at Marshall's for $50 and the more I looked at sewing my own, I'd have a lot more just in fabric/materials, renting a machine or hiring out the work, etc.<br><br>
XOXO<br>
B
 
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